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Discussion Starter #23
This one does not have a piggy back reservoir?
You’re correct. Piggy back and remote reservoir shocks are much better for racing or spirited riding as they carry more volume and dissipate heat better and don’t fade.
I would have preferred a piggy back style but it was not offered for my model. I looked at a Biturbo rear shock which was too dear for me but interestingly also didn’t have a seperate reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Another update.
I got a moment and set my sag, (30mm geared up) and went for a ride. First impressions are the steering feels razor sharp now, it’s like I think about turning in and it’s happening. My fork legs have always been as low as possible in my triples which would have made the front too high and resulted in lazy steering. The rear of the bike is now 25mm higher with the YSS shock installed so it’s up a lot and feels great. I got the efi YSS rear shock so it starts off 10mm longer and I can lengthen from there if required.
I went for a common loop I ride and noted one particular corner where the road surface is not great and the choppy acceleration is no more.
I’m playing with fork settings next to get a nice balance hopefully.
I realise there will be some placebo effect but right now my tier two shock feels worlds away from my 25 year old Showa I replaced
986409
 

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Good to hear it is working for you, a couple of notes:

This shows a lower spec suspension component CAN be better than a higher one if simply set closer to what the user needs/wants. Simply replacing a terrible spring and replacing with a spring with a better rate is a excellent improvement 90% of the time. Loosing oil capacity is not great but with the ability to change the oil more often not that big a deal. Losing a compression adjuster is only a issue if low speed compression needs changing. Ride height adjustability is great on these bikes allowing you to find that sweet spot in chassis set up for each owner.

Now we simply need to see how it holds up long term. keep us informed and best of luck.
 

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I have used YSS shock's for some of the older BMW airheads for customers & have had really good luck with them, some customers have had these on their bikes for 10-12 years and no issues. I used to use Koni's on all of these bikes but Koni no longer makes motorcycle shocks, but they sold the rights of their shocks to Ikon. Ikon shocks are the exact same shock as a Koni--same part numbers and the Ikon rebuild kits will rebuild the older Koni's, So for the older BMW airheads Ikon is my goto shock. I have not looked to see if they offer one for the 900SS yet, But I will
 

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I have a leaky rear shock on my SS right now, and was looking through bunch of options. YSS is a really tempting option, so really appreciate the review.
 

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I've actually replaced my OEM Showa with a later model SSie Sachs. My Showa was in piss poor shape and had been run for who knows how long with no oil in it. I kept it to possibly rebuild it later on.

The Sachs I have is no good. It has some pitting on the rod so will tear the seal up eventually. I'm contemplating ordering another, newer one from an 800SS and see if that will work for now.

Maybe then I can get the current Sachs torn down and rebuild it. I dunno. I'd rather just buy a new shock. That way, I start with a known new condition and progress from there.

The YSS has been on my radar but I kinda have my heart set on a Bitubo. They're not far apart in terms of money. At least here in the US.

I could easily wind up wasting nearly as much money, and as importantly, more time trying to rebuild a lost cause.

I'll wait to see how things pan out, and thanks for keeping us informed...sean
 

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I've actually replaced my OEM Showa with a later model SSie Sachs. My Showa was in piss poor shape and had been run for who knows how long with no oil in it. I kept it to possibly rebuild it later on.

The Sachs I have is no good. It has some pitting on the rod so will tear the seal up eventually. I'm contemplating ordering another, newer one from an 800SS and see if that will work for now.

Maybe then I can get the current Sachs torn down and rebuild it. I dunno. I'd rather just buy a new shock. That way, I start with a known new condition and progress from there.

The YSS has been on my radar but I kinda have my heart set on a Bitubo. They're not far apart in terms of money. At least here in the US.

I could easily wind up wasting nearly as much money, and as importantly, more time trying to rebuild a lost cause.

I'll wait to see how things pan out, and thanks for keeping us informed...sean
How well does the ie shock works on the carby? I read that it's a bit longer, and generally an improvement over the Showa rear shock. That's another option that I'm thinking about - I have a (fairly) local suspension specialist who rebuilds OEM shock for about $250. If I can find an SSie shock cheap enough, I can either have that one rebuilt, or Showa rebuilt, without downtime. Or YSS. Bitubo is a bit dear for me...
 

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I bought a YSS for my 95 Speed Triple as choices are slim, I was impressed with the quality for the price paid. Its not Ohlins and for that particular bike I wasn't concerned about serious performance otherwise I would have gone the Ohlins route
 

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How well does the ie shock works on the carby? I read that it's a bit longer, and generally an improvement over the Showa rear shock.
Well, that is true but it only holds true from what I’ve read, for the Sachs shock. The Showa is the same length across the board. Apparently anyway.

The Sachs is supposedly better. As in, it has a better damping circuit. The downside is, it is also supposedly not rebuildable.

I use the words apparently and supposedly with good reason. I called the local Sachs Service center ( at Sonoma Raceway) and was told the Sachs shock is not rebuildable and they won’t touch it.

There are videos on the interwebz showing them being rebuilt though. Supposedly, Öhlins internals drop right in.

As I’ve not personally accomplished a rebuild, much less with Öhlins replacement parts, supposedly is apt description based on that.

I know for a fact the Sachs shock is longer by 12mm or so because I measured my OEM Showa side by side with the Sachs. This is based on both being unloaded (off the bike) and at the minimum spring preload adjustment. Measurement taken from center of eyelet to center of eyelet.

I use apparently with regard to the Showa vs the Sachs because it has been in prior discussions on this very forum.

In those discussions, members who’ve bought a Showa presumed to be from the later SSie wrote that it was not longer than their OEM Showa taken off their bike.

This could be because theirs was already upgraded but when some are the original owners I discount that theory. I can only be 100% confident in what I have personally measured, or experienced.

Not that distrust other highly experienced forum members. Just that previous discussions reveal some inconsistencies with accepted facts.

A YSS listed on eBay right now lists for $357 USD. A Bitubo lists for a bit over $500 USD. So for roughly $155 USD more I can get a higher end shock. Then there is the Hagon shock which falls roughly halfway in between.

I have experience with Hagon and they make an excellent product. I’d not hesitate to buy from them again.

Prices I’ve listed are for new and unused shocks.
 

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Well, that is true but it only holds true from what I’ve read, for the Sachs shock. The Showa is the same length across the board. Apparently anyway.

The Sachs is supposedly better. As in, it has a better damping circuit. The downside is, it is also supposedly not rebuildable.

I use the words apparently and supposedly with good reason. I called the local Sachs Service center ( at Sonoma Raceway) and was told the Sachs shock is not rebuildable and they won’t touch it.

There are videos on the interwebz showing them being rebuilt though. Supposedly, Öhlins internals drop right in.

As I’ve not personally accomplished a rebuild, much less with Öhlins replacement parts, supposedly is apt description based on that.

I know for a fact the Sachs shock is longer by 12mm or so because I measured my OEM Showa side by side with the Sachs. This is based on both being unloaded (off the bike) and at the minimum spring preload adjustment. Measurement taken from center of eyelet to center of eyelet.

I use apparently with regard to the Showa vs the Sachs because it has been in prior discussions on this very forum.

In those discussions, members who’ve bought a Showa presumed to be from the later SSie wrote that it was not longer than their OEM Showa taken off their bike.

This could be because theirs was already upgraded but when some are the original owners I discount that theory. I can only be 100% confident in what I have personally measured, or experienced.

Not that distrust other highly experienced forum members. Just that previous discussions reveal some inconsistencies with accepted facts.

A YSS listed on eBay right now lists for $357 USD. A Bitubo lists for a bit over $500 USD. So for roughly $155 USD more I can get a higher end shock. Then there is the Hagon shock which falls roughly halfway in between.

I have experience with Hagon and they make an excellent product. I’d not hesitate to buy from them again.

Prices I’ve listed are for new and unused shocks.
Well if this is of any help the Showa on my SSie measured out at 335 mm center to center.Replaced mine with a Cogent as I wanted 3 way with ride hieght adjustability
 

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The sachs IS rebuildable in that it can be freshened (oil and nitrogen) but Sachs will not sell parts so if you need hard parts you are on your own. There are some sachs shocks that are not easily done so I do not recommend it but the SS shock is as easy as any other. Good valve and internals it truly is a shame they do not offer parts.
 

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I just bought a rear shock from SSie. I found it way cheaper than I anticipated, and the condition looks to be pretty good. Will see how it works out, but it must be way better than my leaky unit.
 
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