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Discussion Starter #1
As much as I hate to admit it, riding isn't as comfortable these days as it was back when the bike was new. In fact, in less than 20 miles now, my wrists and hands start to bother me, big-time. No doubt that more time in the saddle would help in staying more used to the position and pressure, but being in my early 50s now, and in otherwise good, trim shape, I'm thinking that raising the bars a bit has got to help, regardless.
I recently read a suggestion here of flipping the bar clamps from right to left, which is certainly a cheap enough way of testing the theory, but moving forward on the assumption that higher bars have got to help, has anyone used the items from Heli-bars or Apex? What was your impression - any pluses and/or minuses? Was there any interference with fairings, etc. from the change of position, or effects on the handling of the bike?
Inquiring (aging) minds want to know...
TIA,
Doc
 

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I had a similar experience when I first got my bike (she being the first real sport bike I'd ridden). These are the things that helped me.
Use your back/abs/legs to support your weight. Basically you want to take your weight off of your hands.
Keep your speed above 80mph. The wind resistance of your torso will help hold it up.

Hope this helps.

PS- I'm also in my early 50s, but don't tell anybody.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
LOL...OK, duly noted...
 

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These are the things that helped me.
Use your back/abs/legs to support your weight. Basically you want to take your weight off of your hands.
Ed is right on the mark do sit-ups or leg raises, and it may sound stupid but don't hang on to the grips so tight (I find it really helps).
 

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Along the same lines, I have found that wearing leather pants, instead of jeans, gives me a much better 'grip' on the seat facilitating the use of my legs and core to support my upper body taking most of the preasure off my arms.
 

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+1 on the ass-less chaps----I mean leather pants. Really helps the core if you can grip with your legs.
 

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Along the same lines, I have found that wearing leather pants, instead of jeans, gives me a much better 'grip' on the seat facilitating the use of my legs and core to support my upper body taking most of the preasure off my arms.
+1 I've found that this works for me too.
 

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Apex bars are very good. I had to flip my bars upward but both my hands had carpal with surgery this helps me a lot and can ride all day with no problems.

Sleeping at night I try not to bend my arms and try to keep them straight this helps me a lot!

The Apex bars give you much more adjustment then any other bar on the market!!! You may want to give them a upward lift.

If your hands hurt in the morning try to wrap a towel around your elbow to keep from bending your arms at night. Bending pinches the nerve which gives us pain in the hands(carpal)..
 

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ergos

to reverse a bit of the "ass up/hands down" ergos, i've found that every bit helps. here's what i've done:

-- got a corbin seat, it's 1 1/4inches lower than stock
-- raised the triples to the max
-- found a L/P tank bra, and i move forward until there's, ah, interference. being a bit closer to the bars helps.
-- needed a new front tire this season, and went with the SP-sized front. 120/70 is 12mm (1/2inch) higher than the 120/60 series (stock for ss/cr).
-- get a modern jacket, with precurved arms. reduces binding in the armpits.
-- alleve
-- go very fast, all the time

good luck!
bobp

ps turning 60 this may :cool:
 

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some is the low-ness of the bars and some is the forward reach. depends on your height. try to figure which it is as the solutions are different. if its the reach a bar that is higher won't help as much.
I recently put cyclecats on my 999 and they have a lot of adjustment and it helped a ton. very well made and lots of range of motion to adjust.
A throttle lock of somekind allows you to sit up and take your right hand off the bars for a minute, not just the left.
Be sure the brake and clutch levers are adjusted so they are neutral - not bend in your wrist when in riding position - anything causing you to extend your wrists will aggravate the numbness.
-Core exercises like the others said a big help.
good luck
 

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When I first got my Duc, if I spent the day riding, the next day put me on ice. I already had Ferracci risers. I began to exercise my midsection. I would clamp my bike a little at the thighs (very little) and use my abs to alleviate pressure from my hands-whenever it hurt. After a while, it became second nature. Eventually, I just got used to it.
 

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Core, Core, Core!

I'm 62 and have 2 compressed lumbar discs. After being treated by my Chiropractor with some really good core exercises, I have no back/hand/wrist issues anymore. I do several track days a year and can ride for a couple of hours with no hand/wrist/back problems. Sit on the bike (on a rear stand) and see if you can hold on tight enough with your butt/legs/feet to allow you to only rest your hands lightly on the bars. Can you hold this for a while? If not, start the core exercises! You only need to hold the handlebars very lightly. Higher bars and a better seating position won't help as much as core strength.
P.S. I do not do sit-ups. A strong lower back, not abs, is what you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks a lot, guys - lots of good advice here. Also glad to see that I'm not alone in this situation!
Some of this I've already done, really more having figured it out while in the saddle than having any real knowledge about what to do or not to do, but obviously my core is not as strong as it needs to be. I can clamp with my legs, and hold myself up off the bars with my abs - but not for long enough to make much of a difference overall. At 6', my height's not much of a problem in this matter, although I do find my legs bent more than I'd like these days, and a bit cramped feeling! :crazy:
I think I'll try the Apex risers, and I've been contemplating the whole Corbin/Sargent aftermarket seat the last few weeks anyway - those along with the throttle lock I just got from DesmoTimes, and some core-building exercises may just be the hot ticket to Comfort Land.
If anybody else has any other input or personal experience about any aspect of this, please keep it coming -
 

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Be sure the brake and clutch levers are adjusted so they are neutral - not bend in your wrist when in riding position - anything causing you to extend your wrists will aggravate the numbness.
This for me was a big help, in addition to a 1.5" clipon rise.
 

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I had HELI-Bars on my SSie, made it much more all-day-comfortable (though i had to bend the resevoirmounts to stop them clipping the fairing).

As mentioned, core-training and lever alignment are key too!

Chris
 

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I installed helibars on my Haybusa which raised the bars 1 5/8" and a 1/2" back. I didn't notice a radical improvement but it does help some. As already mentioned core strength helps a lot.
 

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Use your back/abs/legs to support your weight. Basically you want to take your weight off of your hands.
Keep your speed above 80mph. The wind resistance of your torso will help hold it up.
Sound advice, I also am carrying much damage at my age and found the second tip (at legal speed) does help to bring a weightlessness to the upper body. I also found that most of the problems stemmed from me being too tense around the shoulders/neck/wrists and hands and learning to relax yet use the right muscles solved most of it. Glad to see i'm not alone here!
 

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I hope you do not mind all going on about the correct posture on the bike. for me its a bug bear. if i hear some one going on about wrist ache it brings back memories about my early issues.....and i had to change. i listened to a friend and started to grip the tank. my son gave me lots of core exercises like the plank which in turn now. i can ride for a hour or two to work with no issues. no aches and no wrist pain. for me i have no weight on the front bars. in town this is hard but when you ride the bike on open roads you should be able to see and feel the difference.
regards Vincenzo
 

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I have heli bars on my 95 900SS. They are clip-ons that are just higher. They were on the bike when I bought it so I can't talk about the normal position because I've never experienced it. I do fine with these, no complaints really.

LSL has a bar conversion for some Ducati bikes. It uses standard bars and they mount on top of the triple clamp. Looks like this:

LSL Bar Conversion Kit - Ducati 750 SS & 900 SS ie 98-on

This kind of thing. I know it is out there as I've seen them on early 900 SS bikes, like 91 to 95 era. Just have to do some searching for it.

900ss lsl bars image by ohioriver on Photobucket

There are SWAT Clip-ons that have risers and Woodcraft risers and Convertibars and I believe Cycle Cat has clip-ons with risers.
 
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