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Discussion Starter #1
I spend more time than makes good sense on different motorcycle forums, being of the firmly held opinion that two wheels (even without a motor) is the right number. By way of confession, I am also a fan of riding most anything. At the moment, my "go to" bike is a BMW R1200GS (pre WC). Before I bought the GS, the other bike that was under consideration was the MTS. At the time, the main issue I read about was swelling fuel tanks. Worry about various problems and the purchase cost swayed me to the BMW (which is where I "come from" anyway).

I really did like the Multistrada, and had the original PP been closer (to the GS) in price, who knows?

In my forum haunting, I largely avoid "should I buy a (fill in the blank)" threads, because other folks are often way more eager to chime in than me, with both positive and negative opinions. But here I find myself wanting to seek some opinions from owners of DVT Multis, especially from any expatriate or current BMW owners. You see, I'm planning to go re-test ride one of the newer bikes, and sort of wonder what I should look for, look at, think about, etc. Not really asking "should I buy one," since I suppose most of the owners here would say "yes!"

My use would likely be weekend all-around thrashes, day rides into the mountains, and hopefully some longer trips with the buds. Most of those are still BMW guys, with a couple Super Tens in there. Do I need to replace the BMW? Well, no. It's a gorgeous bike, with really nothing left for me to do to make it suit me or perform any better. But if I can find it a new home, I might be able to move to the MTS without huge additional expense.

So there ya go. Asking a question that hopefully isn't too big a pain in the collective backside. Feel free to answer via PM if you'd rather.
 

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I'm not qualified to answer your Q; I've neither owned a BMW GS or a DVT Multi.

But I can tell you a story of a time I went to test ride the new GS. The dealer outlined a nice 30-45 min ride for me, gave me directions etc. I really wanted to like that bike. I was putting about 25k miles/yr on my multi and wanted something w/o expensive valve checks, chain/sprockets, wind protection etc... I wanted something more sensible.

I set off from the dealer ship and not even 3miles into my ride I knew THIS BIKE AINT FOR ME. It was sooooooooooooooo boring. I actually felt sorry for ppl who've only ridden Beemers and nothing else. The Multi is the opposite.

Moral of the story; sell the BMW, buy the Duc.

Bang for buck, the 1st gen WC 2010-12 are dirt cheap and arguably the best of the bunch. flame on! :grin2:
 

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I came from a BMW K1600 and wanted a lighter bike. Getting older and wanted to be able to pick up what I rode. I was sure I wanted a R1000XR, one local dealer carried BMW and Ducati. So I decided to try both and the rode them back to back. I was sure the BMW would be going home with me. Have been riding the 2016 Multistrada for 2 years and still put a smile on my face when I ride it. Ride one and you will know.
 

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If you decide on a Duc, make sure it's new. You will need the warranty, purchasing an extended warranty would be a wise decision as well. Great deals on leftover 17 models, $4-5000 off MSRP & 0% financing was their latest specials.
 

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I have had a few R BMW’s. My favorite being a 2005 R1100S. I test rode Multi’s several times over the years and never left the BMW fold. I needed a more sport touring rig for two up riding though. My main bike is my track bike, 1199.

After a short test ride on the 2015 DVT, I was sold. Such a great bike that does so much so well. I bought a leftover 2015 when the 16’s came out. Has been a great bike, no regrets at all. Would buy a new 1260 tomorrow if something happened to mine.
 
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I came from a BMW K1600 and wanted a lighter bike. Getting older and wanted to be able to pick up what I rode. I was sure I wanted a R1000XR, one local dealer carried BMW and Ducati. So I decided to try both and the rode them back to back. I was sure the BMW would be going home with me. Have been riding the 2016 Multistrada for 2 years and still put a smile on my face when I ride it. Ride one and you will know.

This is exactly the same situation for me , came from a K1600 now on a 2017 1200S DVT, tried the S1000XR didnt like the buzz.
 

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I'm not qualified to answer your Q; I've neither owned a BMW GS or a DVT Multi.

But I can tell you a story of a time I went to test ride the new GS. The dealer outlined a nice 30-45 min ride for me, gave me directions etc. I really wanted to like that bike. I was putting about 25k miles/yr on my multi and wanted something w/o expensive valve checks, chain/sprockets, wind protection etc... I wanted something more sensible.

I set off from the dealer ship and not even 3miles into my ride I knew THIS BIKE AINT FOR ME. It was sooooooooooooooo boring. I actually felt sorry for ppl who've only ridden Beemers and nothing else. The Multi is the opposite.

Moral of the story; sell the BMW, buy the Duc.

Bang for buck, the 1st gen WC 2010-12 are dirt cheap and arguably the best of the bunch. flame on! <img src="http://www.ducati.ms/forums/images/Ducati_ms_2015/smilies/tango_face_grin.png" border="0" alt="" title="Big Grin" class="inlineimg" />
I just went through this with a BMW GSA. I wanted to really like that bike but the Multi is better for me even though I absolutely hate cleaning a chain on a regular basis.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah, the chain is a small negative, but this wouldn't be my first or only chain-drive bike. Haven't ridden the S1000XR, but thought I wanted an S1000R; insurance cost killed that, and I'm an OF. My current insurance company has the Multi classified as "high performance," (duh) but it should probably be more in line with the GS/GSA/S10. Foremost quoted it out fairly reasonably.
 

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My current insurance company has the Multi classified as "high performance," (duh) but it should probably be more in line with the GS/GSA/S10. Foremost quoted it out fairly reasonably.
I'd tend to agree with your insurance company... the Multi is MUCH closer to the S1000 line than the GS/GSA, you'll likely realize that pretty quickly when you test ride the bike.

I've not owned a GS but I've rented one a couple times in Germany (couple thousand miles on the LC version, there's a trip report from my first GS Tour a couple years ago on here somewhere). It will remain my "go to" bike for renting in the EU (even though they had Multi's and XR's at a some of the dealers). The reason why is the same reason as the insurance classification... the GS is a very nice, non-extreme, very comfortable, decent handling, decent performing bike. There's nothing bad there, and for some folks those things are exactly what they're looking for. When I'm renting something I want it to be those things to avoid leading me into temptation.

Performance wise, the reality is that the stock Multi 1200 and GS have very similar power curves... up to around 7500 or so. The GS will definitely get up and go... the difference is at the hooligan end of the power curve. Over 8000 the Multi takes off like it's getting chased by the cops (which occasionally may be true) and the GS starts wheezing and asking for more gear. Now if you're a rider who's always casual then you'll likely never feel a difference and wonder what everyone is talking about... IMO those folks are better off with the GS or the Super Tenere (which is another great bike, in fact I'd recommend the ST over the GS for folks who don't plan to get into more hardcore dirt/offroad - where IMO the GS is A BIT better - not that any of the heavyweight adv bikes are really good there).

Handling wise, the GS is competent as with everything else but it definitely is more sedate - the first time I had one in Germany I hit a twisty road about half an hour outside of Frankfurt and while I was still taking it VERY easy (learning the bike) I still surprised myself by scraping a peg on the second or third corner. It scared the hell out of me because I was really behaving myself compared to what I'd have been doing on the Multi so completely surprised. For the rest of the trip I was doing a lot more body position management in the corners which of course resolved the problem completely, but while the Multi scrapes when you're pushing it... the GS scrapes at substantially less aggressive cornering.

Trip to Maine 2 weeks ago is a good example... rode with my Cousin Greg (13 Multi S) and Brother Steve (Super Tenere which to me feels very similar to the GS). 99% of the trip you'd never notice any difference between the three bikes... Greg usually takes point and he's very conservative... no more than 5 over, everyone stuck together. But a couple times I got point... and things get a bit more interesting. I still behave when cruising (limit to 5 over which is hard for me)... but leaving lights, after turns and especially when passing I have a tendency to get on it. When we did that Steve would drop way back. When the revs are low there's not much difference, at the top of the tach there's a big difference.
 

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Yeah, the chain is a small negative, but this wouldn't be my first or only chain-drive bike. Haven't ridden the S1000XR, but thought I wanted an S1000R; insurance cost killed that, and I'm an OF. My current insurance company has the Multi classified as "high performance," (duh) but it should probably be more in line with the GS/GSA/S10. Foremost quoted it out fairly reasonably.
Check insurance price on the touring model. Factory installed saddle bags lower may insurance companies price. My Multistrada S Touring was $500 less per year than the BMW XR.
 

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Depends on what you enjoy most about riding. The Multistrada is a rider's ride; it will probably suit you best if you derive most of your enjoyment from operating the motorcycle, vs. all the other things that come with being a motorcyclist. GS is the way to go if you want the bike customized and farkled to your exact specifications, or if the appearance of being an ADV rider is important; the casual observer thinks the MTS is a sport bike, and comes with a different set of stereotypes which you may or may not like, or even care about.
 

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I have an 09 GS (hexhead, air cooled) and a 16 MTS and love them both. When dirt roads or really long distances are involved the GS gets the nod. For the pure joy and ecstatic pleasure of flying over the earth I ride the MTS. The gs wetheads close the gap a bit but are not anything like the big v twin on the MTS.

The BMW is one of the most iconic and popular bikes of all time for good reason. As Dave pointed out, it does everything well. I especially like the ergonomics and the low center of gravity which is delightful in the turns. I have been able to customize the tires, seat, screen and bar reach better on the GS than the Multi to suit me.

The MTS is a rush and makes me do bad things. The acceleration, ability to carve turns and instant hit of power from almost anywhere is addictive.

Many ride the GS off road (jeep trails, single track) but I do not - but I will ride 100's of miles on dirt forest service/county roads with it. The MTS has too much tech for all the vibration on washboards, although it rides fine, so mine stays mostly on asphalt.

If you are fit - I think about double your body weight is a good rule for the max weight of your bike for serious off road. I am 160lbs and my wr450f with 4 gallons is about 290lbs - that is about perfect for me and I will pass much better and younger riders off road on their big 500lb adv bikes.

If I had to pick one, the GS would probably be the one, although I KNOW I would be dreaming about the Ducati. Kinda of like Mary Ann vs Ginger.
 

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The previous post sums it up for me. I have a ‘12 R1200GS. And a ‘15 DVT 1200 S Multi. The GS is a great bike. Either would serve as an “only 1” bike. I tend to take the GS touring when the wife comes, as there is just more room, and the GS seems to handle the extra weight better. (I’m 6-1, 240, the wife is normal sized, not overweight) Plus, I have Touratech luggage, in 3 sizes, and when I have the 38 and 45 liter combination the space is cavernous.

By myself, I almost always take the Duc, it’s just my preferred ride, most times. I’ve ridden both in the alps, and the GS holds its own. One year, when my Duc was down needing service, I took my GS to the European Multistrada Meeting. The GS did just fine in some “very spririted” riding.

I have talked up the GS more, because we all know what the Multi is like. If you don’t plan on much off-road riding, and the bike fits you ergonomically, the Multi a great choice. It tours well, and almost always brings a smile to my face. I recommend an extended warranty.
 

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I rode my Super Tenere on a variety of tires for 24k miles during the 3 season that I owned it. I believe that the 19 inch front wheel causes the bike to handle much differently than the MTS. I was never really happy in tight twisties. It always felt like I was going to low side or run wide. For the riding that I do I much prefer the Ducati 17 inch front.
 

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Man, I love throwing my Multistrada into a corner at speed. Click down into the right gear, scrub off enough speed with the brake, lean in and start accelerating hard mid-corner. There is no better feeling. It just does this so well that I find myself hoping I hit left turns with a green light so I can carry as much speed into the corner as I can. The MTS definitely brings out my inner hooligan. The chassis is excellent and that 1200 4 valve motor just sings above 8000rpms. The new DVT is even better. I probably would avoid the 2015-2016 DVT bikes though as there were issues with the early models. Ducati has them fairly well sorted now though.

I’ve had very few problems with my 2014 Multistrada, again this was the last year of the 2nd generation MTS. It is the S model and I’ve owned it since new. I do a fair bit of commuting on it and I’ve put almost 15,000 miles on it and other than fuel sensor errors, Ducati has replaced two of them under warranty, I’ve had very little trouble with it.
 

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Having ridden both - own the Multi, borrowed the GS - I'd say they are totally different bikes. The BMW riding position requires a reach out to the bars - feels like you have a lot of bike out front whereas the Duc you feel over top of the bike - more compact. By design the telelever BMW front end removes any feedback - I found it disconcerting where the Multi encourages you to go faster into a turn the BMW I found myself slowing down because I had relatively no feeling from the front end - more like you had to 'point' it and wait. Like a 1972 Chrysler Newport. And that was my overall impression of the 1200 - numb. Dull, utilitarian and numb. I have also ridden the 800GS which I prefer over the 1200 - it is utilitarian for sure but capable and smooth. It's not a pretty bike - it's not trying to be - it says let's go just sitting there and keeps $10k in your wallet.
Here's where I come down - if you want a bike to go off the paved roads - GS800. If you stick to pavement get the Multi.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I probably would avoid the 2015-2016 DVT bikes though as there were issues with the early models. Ducati has them fairly well sorted now though.
Other than the rear brake and the fuel level sensor, what issues would be specific to the '15-16? The one I'm looking at is a NOS '16 S Touring. Are there any recalls or TSBs for fixes that would be done "on the fly," meaning before or at the time of purchase?

I've got no plans for off-roading; what I like about the GS and the Multi is the seating position: Upright, great visibility of the road and traffic. Oddly enough, I'm too short for the F800GS; it's taller than the MTS Enduro.
 

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Other than the rear brake and the fuel level sensor, what issues would be specific to the '15-16? The one I'm looking at is a NOS '16 S Touring. Are there any recalls or TSBs for fixes that would be done "on the fly," meaning before or at the time of purchase?
I have had a 2015 for almost 3 years, no problems at all other than a few recals done while the yearly service was being completed.

There are two other DVT’s in our group (1-2015, 2-2016’s) and neither have been troublesome. One has over 40k miles and has been less trouble for him than his last two BMW’s.
 

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Having never ridden a GS I don't have the exact experience needed to make a qualified call here. That said, I owned a S1000R for a couple years and felt it lacked character. It did everything flawlessly and left me wanted a bit more... idk... interaction with the bike. One day I took a trip to the Duc dealer. I rode a DVT and instantly fell in love with it. That day I put the S1K up for sale. I'm a review/research nut, so over the following few weeks I dug in on the DVT. It seemed like a lot of guys were having quality issues with them. I read a lot of comments on build quality, cheap materials being using, stuff just plain falling off. It wasn't good. I literally had deposit money on a brand new white one at the local dealer and I was very, very torn. I found a pristine '11 single spark at another local dealer. Came with every accessory and had a stack of service records because the PO was AR about the thing. I bought that '11. Still have it currently, and it's one of the funnest bikes I've ever owned.

All that aside, the DVT is an absolutely gorgeous machine. It's really going to come down to how much you want to interact with your motorcycle.
 

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I bought a used '15 last year with 700 miles. i now have a little over 7k. The only things that came up were a couple of recalls, ecu update, and one issue with a rattling muffler replaced under warranty. Get the Multistrada over the BMW if you are want more sportiness.
 
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