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Discussion Starter #1
Might be a stupid noob question but I really don't know much about electronics so...

Which wires should I use to lengthen the wires coming from an Ignitech ignition?
I forgot to ask for a longer wire harnass when I ordered the Ignitech and now the wires are just a few centimeters to short to mount the unit under the seat.
So I have to replace or lenghten the wires but I'm not sure which diameter to use...

0,5mm², 0,75mm² or 1mm² ? :unsure:

I found some info on a Laverda forum saying that 18 gauge (1mm²) will do the trick but I don't know if I can trust these Laverda guys...
;)

Thanks!!
 

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Just strip back some of the existing wire on the ignition and then get some new wire the exact same copper diameter is the safest way, Then you need to join it,

Crimps are better than solder and heatshrink as solder creates a stiff point and eventually the wire will break either side of the solder.

If you stagger the crimps and use the ones that heatshrink down after you get a good joint, a little bulky but can look acceptable if you are careful
N
 

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once you find out the exact size of the wire --For Gods sake replace the plug wires--splicing bits in is nothing but stupid--will it work probably is it the correct way to do the job -NO. If the job is worth doing it's worth doing correctly---& If you dont have time to do the job correcty the first time -what makes you think you have time to do it correctly the 2nd or 3rd time. Freeking plug wire is inexpensive
 

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I thought he was talking about the input side. Assuming that, If you don’t use wire pretty close to what you’re connecting to it’s hard to use crimp connectors.
 

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It's hard to tell what he is talking about to me --Is it the ing. system or the ignitech coils, It would be nice to have a bit more detail
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's hard to tell what he is talking about to me --Is it the ing. system or the ignitech coils, It would be nice to have a bit more detail
I thought that was pretty obvious...
Which wires should I use to lengthen the wires coming from an Ignitech ignition?
I forgot to ask for a longer wire harnass when I ordered the Ignitech and now the wires are just a few centimeters to short to mount the unit under the seat.
So I have to replace or lenghten the wires but I'm not sure which diameter to use...

0,5mm², 0,75mm² or 1mm² ? :unsure:

I found some info on a Laverda forum saying that 18 gauge (1mm²) will do the trick but I don't know if I can trust these Laverda guys...
Ever heard anyone talk about 0,5mm², 0,75mm² or 1mm² plug leads? About an Ignitech ignition when he was talking about coils? A wire harnass coming out of some coils?

So yes, I was talking about the ignition module. As most people do when they mention an 'ignitech ignition'...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
once you find out the exact size of the wire --For Gods sake replace the plug wires--splicing bits in is nothing but stupid--will it work probably is it the correct way to do the job -NO. If the job is worth doing it's worth doing correctly---& If you dont have time to do the job correcty the first time -what makes you think you have time to do it correctly the 2nd or 3rd time. Freeking plug wire is inexpensive
As told before; I was not talking about 'freeking' plug wires.

And please; relax!! If you have read my question you have probably seen that I was talking about...

So I have to replace or lenghten the wires but I'm not sure which diameter to use...
So, all together; I just asked if someone could tell me what gauge to use when I replace the wires. I know that replacing is a better option then lenghten them.
And yes; I can cut a wire and see but I don't know how to determine the exact diameter of the copper core.
And yes again; I can cut a piece and take that to the auto-shop and compare but I work from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. so I was thinking ordering the wires online. Hard to compare a piece of wire against a photo on a website.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I thought he was talking about the input side. Assuming that, If you don’t use wire pretty close to what you’re connecting to it’s hard to use crimp connectors.
I was indeed talking about the input side. Glad someone noticed. ;)

And even if I replace all the wires I think I should have the correct diameter (gauge) to fit them in the connectors that came with the ignitech.
To do that, the OD of the wires can't be too big or they won't fit in the connector. So I have to make sure that I use wires that are not too large in OD.
But since these wires conduct electricity, the ID is even more important. Sadly, there is no way to dertermine the ID starting from the OD because of the different types of insulation.

And that's why I was hoping that someone could tell me what gauge to use.
My question seems more complicated then I thought...
Sorry for that.
😔
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just strip back some of the existing wire on the ignition and then get some new wire the exact same copper diameter is the safest way, Then you need to join it,

Crimps are better than solder and heatshrink as solder creates a stiff point and eventually the wire will break either side of the solder.

If you stagger the crimps and use the ones that heatshrink down after you get a good joint, a little bulky but can look acceptable if you are careful
N
That's also an option. The wires will be in a pvc sleeve tied together under a frame tube so the looks aren't that important.

And the advice about going for crimps rather then solder is something that I read on a lot of forums so I'll keep that in mind. At first I assumed that soldering would be better (stronger, better for conductivity,...) but the point that the 'stiff point' creates a weak spot makes sense.
Thanks for the input!
 

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If you immobilize the wires on either side of the joint so that there is no motion, soldering is fine. If you decide to crimp the joints get quality and compatible crimp tools and sleeves and practice on some scrap wire. Crimping isn't as simple as it sounds. You can use lower gauge wire (thicker) than the original wires. If you think about it a crimp connector has much more surface area than the original wire. I would not recommend attempting to disassemble the original connectors. Can you purchase a longer harness from Ignitech?
 

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No quick wire gauge answer is possible unless the electrical load is known.
Firstly - can't Ignitech give you a spec. on the wire size used?
If not, what size fuse is recommended ? = go to an ampacity chart for size.
Some likely confusion on responses is the AWG and mm2 wire size conversion .


A properly soldered (not overcooked) and shrink tubed connection is pretty bulletproof,
I have seen crimped connections fail from moisture. Although if properly sealed , the crimp
alternative is unlikely to be problem. Either way with strain relief will do.
Also, many crimp tools have multiple size strippers that are a pretty good way to gauge your existing wire .
980310

Good Luck,
Jim
 

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If you have a crimp connector assortment, see what barely fits the connector. That is the size wire you buy.
 

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if you get the wire size 1 size larger or smaller then what is there you should be fine. On older bikes that ran a 6 Volt system the wiring is larger then it is on most 12 volt system bikes. this a a guess only since I dont have the ignitech system on my bike but I would look at 16-18 or 20 gauge wiring, But I would think that Ignitech could supply you with that info quick and easy & supply you with a harness a bit longer
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you immobilize the wires on either side of the joint so that there is no motion, soldering is fine. If you decide to crimp the joints get quality and compatible crimp tools and sleeves and practice on some scrap wire. Crimping isn't as simple as it sounds. You can use lower gauge wire (thicker) than the original wires. If you think about it a crimp connector has much more surface area than the original wire. I would not recommend attempting to disassemble the original connectors. Can you purchase a longer harness from Ignitech?
I checked the connectors and they are pretty easy to disassemble.

I used a paperclip and the terminals came right out of the connector with no problem at all. So I think I'm gonna replace the wires with new ones instead of crimping extra pieces on the wires to lengthen them. That way I can make every wire just as long as it should be and fit everything nicely without any loops in the loom.

I got some extra female connectors with the unit so if I order some extra male ones I should be ready to go.

And I have access to professional crimping pliers so I hope replacing the wires won't be too big of a problem. And in case I fail, I can always order a longer harness from Ignitech. But I like to try first myself. More pleasure in making things then in buying things, you know?

Btw: I had a technician at my work check the wires and they are 0,75mm².
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Together with the Ignitech I bought some Nology coils to replace the stock ones.
I'm making a new bracket for the coils (at the back of the airbox, where the stock ones were mounted) and I'm taking lots of pictures.

If everything is finished, I'll post some pics of the finished situation as well of the work in progress.
But I'm limited in time right now, so don't expect these pics in the next days...

Anyway; thanks to all for the advice given in this thread!!
 

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If you can wait Ignitech sell the blank plug and inserts for less than $10 USD, that would be preferable to having 2 splices per wire.

I'm not a fan of crimp connectors as they are bulky, well soldered then covered with heatshrink type with the glue inside as long as the wires are not subject to flex would be better.



RE Wire Gauge: I have an Ignitech connector in front of me as I'm putting one on a Bevel Drive, the conductor diameter is 1mm so ~18 AWG



Depending on what ohm coil your going to use I would be putting heavier gauge wire to feed the +ve side of the coils (preferably not through your ignition and kill switch but through a relay directly connected to the battery, with a fuse) and the ground wire between the Ignitech box and chassis as the current is flowing through the coil to ground via the box while the coils are in dwell.



The Ignitech will only switch the coils on if it detects engine rotation so it won't be drawing that current until the engine is running. (you can run the 12v to power the box via a fuse > Ignition key > kill swt to pin 3)



If you are going for the "hottest' Nology @ 0.3 ohms that's ~ 40A per coil, If your using the more conventional 3 ohm its only 4A



There are numerous charts on the web giving recommended 12vdc automotive wire gauge for current like this American Wire Gauge Chart and AWG Electrical Current Load Limits table with ampacities, wire sizes, skin depth frequencies and wire breaking strength



I would also invest $10nzd into Liam's from FastBikeGear, Importers and Distributors of Motorcycle Accessories enhanced manual for the Ignitech which give much more info compared to the brief doc you get from the Czechs
 
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