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Discussion Starter #1
I did a search, but didn't see this specific...... I have a '95 916, that unfortunately will being parked soon....got to love Chicago's winters!

It is in a garage (somewhat heated)....covered, battery tender, rear stand...and there was not many miles put on it this year after finishing all the resto/customizing........what else do I need to do?

What do you'all do? ...start every so often....front wheel stand.....????????
 

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heated grips, some tire chains and a heavy jacket. :D

Stands help out a lot from flat spotting the tires.
Keep the battery charged.
Let it run once every three weeks.

Sound like you already have it figured out,
at lease you dont have to keep it outside.
 

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Mate, Jump on a plane and come to Australia. I have a bike for you to ride, this will stop the total insanity setting in being unable to ride.We ride 12 months of the year here!
May also save you from dismembering your wife and putting her in a pickling barrel, which would be the case if I had to be locked away with mine for 3 months or so.:D
 

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If you're not going to ride it (likely) and keeping it in the garage, you'll likely get some condensation on exposed and internal non lubed parts. I'd fog the engine (get a spray can of marine fogger at a boat store). Take out the plugs, spray a small amount in. Turn the kill switch to off and turn it over a few times to coat. Reinstall plugs. Don't put in too much spray. It will burn off when you crank it.

Spray the external metal parts with the fogger too. This is what I do when I put the boat to bed. It will make those parts oily, but the oil comes off easier in the spring than the rust.

When you Stabil, you need to mix it properly with the amount of fuel and run it through the engine for a 15 min. ride to get it into all the parts.

I'd cover with a cotton sheet to keep the dust away versus a bike cover as a sheet will breathe easier in your garage.

I don't do any of this stuff because I make sure to ride mine every week no matter how cold but I'm not in Obamy land either.:p
 

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Bzzzzzttt...don't start the bike unless you intend to ride it.
Sta-Bil in a full tank, battery tender, stands, cover...see you in the spring.

http://www.ducati.ms/forums/search.php?searchid=1815150
I heard that it was a good thing to start the bike at least once a month. The reason being that when the bikes sit for long periods of time that film of oil that coats the moving parts of the engine will eventually settle to the bottom of the bike. When the bike is then started there is a moment where that protective film of oil is not in place doing its job protecting those moving parts.

In my cases my bikes spend their winter in a wooden shed, though protected from the elements it’s still below freezing. I have always been somewhat concerned about starting my bikes, letting them run long enough to get properly warmed up and then shutting them off when temps are below freezing. Wouldn’t this cause condensation inside the bike which could also pose threats to the engine?

Another issue is whether it is prudent to change the oil before the bike hibernates for the winter. What I’ve heard is that letting the bike sit for long periods of time will cause all those little particles of metal and shit settle to the bottom of the engine and then possibly harden. My 999 for example has 1,000 miles on it since its last oil change, should I change the oil before winterizing?

I don’t know whether this stuff is bs or not and sorry to add more questions to this thread but it seems like the right place to ask this stuff. The last three winters for my 999 have consisted of stable in the tank, battery taken out of bike and hooked up to battery tender, 999 up on stand and covered up for the entire winter, just like Chuckracer says. Seems to be just fine so far but it’s nice to know what others do too.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Do I need a front stand as well....or just rear? Forgot, Sta-bil....will do that.

It's and inside cover, so should breath ok.

Run or not run?!
 

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No one mentioned oil, but it's always recommended to change oil before long storage. My method:
Stabil, oil change, run the engine for 5-10 min. Fog the engine and throttle body, spray fogging stuff over metal parts on bike too (or any lubricating spray, probably not WD-40 though, it evaporates). If it's not in heated storage, throw in some quality antifreeze (your bike is liquid cooled). Take out the battery and put it in your basement on the tender. I never like leaving mine to sit out in freezing weather. That sounds like it's it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
so my garage is attached to the house....so it never gets too cold since there are rooms above it....so think I'm ok.

What's with the fogging of metal parts?

Does oil need changing, it was changed this year and less that 1000 mile (closer to 500) were put on?

Front stand needed?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
...sorry, meant to ask...if bike is pluged into the battery tender....do I need to remove from the bike, or can it stay in and plugged in?
 

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i have mine on a tender but don't leave it on 24-7,just a day a week or so.the battery stays in the bike,and the bike is on a rear stand.fresh oil etc.usually during winter i'll do all the service work as well ,so it will get fresh antifreeze etc at some point during winter. bikes a 03 on its second battery (replaced in 04)
 

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I live in Chicago and have a garage too, but it's not heated. Because of that, once it gets below freezing I pull the battery and use the Tender inside. Otherwise I change the oil before winter, keep a full tank of gas, and run it at least every two weeks. I also try to take it for a ride whenever the weather does get nice enough. That way I avoid having to use Stabil or stuff like that. Chicago winters are pretty dry so between the full gas tank and allowing the motor to fully warm up (not just start and shut off 30 seconds later), I've never really worried about condensation. I have front and rear stands (now), but don't consider them critical.

And to the Aussie...3 months? Try again. We pretty much have FIVE months of scarce riding.
 

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Damn Aussies anyway...always stirring the pot and running away. They probably have some incomprehensible saying for that, too.

Really, winter lay-up is for what, 5 months? So I'd imagine the two most important things would be the Sta-Bil (because our Ethanol Fuel these days sucks...water, specifically) and the battery tender. Everything else is...whatever makes ya feel good about it.

I really think starting the bike can do more harm than good, but again...we're not talking forever here. Modern oils cling and stay put just fine for short term lay-ups like this. Whatever condensation you'll generate by starting the bike and not riding it 20 miles or more will burn off the first long ride in the spring, so...whatever. Changing the oil...wouldn't hurt, but for these short lay-ups, whatever acids and what not in the oil really won't hurt anything. I'll change mine, but only because it's due anyways. 1000 miles on the oil? I'd leave it be.

Heated garages are not necessary - it won't hurt your baby to be cold...it's a machine, kids. Stands...sure, why not? Cover...yeah, keep it clean. Maybe some dryer sheets stuffed in some places on the bike to keep mice at bay would be a good idea, too.

There's lots of things you may or may not do, but honestly, I know guys who just park them in the fall and don't do a single thing...start 'em up again in the spring and ride off, and they don't seem to have any problems at all, so maybe we're all just a little crazy and anal here.

Keep that in mind. What would be the incomprehensible Aussie phrase for that? :)
 

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Lets lift the bar here, and move the fuckin thing to the bedroom and place it under the mirror ball while playing Barry Manilow to it all winter, heat some oil (fully syn) in the oven to 90deg and run it through the sump every second day, while stroking the tank with a warm oven mit.:D

I dont know how you guys lock yourselves away for 3 or so months and not ride? Does the X Box get a work out? Come to Aussie, warm track days, cold beer, even in winter!

Comprehend that one mate!:):)
 

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Mate, Jump on a plane and come to Australia. I have a bike for you to ride, this will stop the total insanity setting in being unable to ride.We ride 12 months of the year here!
May also save you from dismembering your wife and putting her in a pickling barrel, which would be the case if I had to be locked away with mine for 3 months or so.:D
hahahah dude us got back from NZ and AUS LOVE THE SHIT OUT OF AUS man good times and even better people... I would love to move there in a yr or so
 

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Summary for surviving the winter

you could just move to florida :)
Just thought I'd dust off this thread, as it seems relevant in the coming weeks.

Summary then:
It is not necessary to do anything for the coming 3-6 months. (Assuming you already have anti-freeze if you are in a freezing place). However, some prep tasks make sense and can help preserve your ride a bit.

Some things to consider (in semi-priority order):
Freezing?:
Yes it is ok to let the bike get cold, but inside sure is a good idea.

Liquid Coolant:
Be sure to have appropriate freezing protection if applicable.

Battery:
You should own a tender anyways. Just leave it hooked up 24-7 if it is designed for that. If you live in a freezing area, it is worth the 5 minutes or so to disconnect the thing and move it inside - and keep it on the tender.

Oil:
Should store fine over the winter. Though I have read that subjecting oil to freezing temperatures can permanently lower the viscosity. I am choosing to change the oil again prior to riding in the spring.

Tires:
The worry is "squaring them off."
EDIT: Apparently, this does not apply to our Radial tires. So Old School.
Go rotate them when you feel like it, maybe a couple of times during the 3-6 months. Or use stands.

Rust / Corrossion:
Certainly put it away clean and dry. If you feel like it, add rust protection to exterior metal parts. Contrary to above post, WD-40 is perfect for this. (WD = Water Displacement formula 40. Yes, the carrier evaporates, leaving behind a light coating of... water displacing oil.)

Engine Interior:
Be sure to run the thing hot and dry before putting it away. If you feel like it, add the marine-oriented engine fogger through the thing. Although, without salt-water your engine should be fine for a few months of storage.

Running the Engine:
While acknowledging the jury is still out on this one, it seems like a no-brainer to me. 90% of all engine wear happens upon startup, while warming up. I'll take one start in the spring over 3-6 extra cold starts in the winter. That said, 3-6 more starts over the year is not going to make a difference much either way.

Rodents and vermin, etc.
Watch out for rat/mouse nests, and snakes. Snakes would be bad. :D Dryer sheets in possible nesting areas not a bad idea. Especially watch for coolant leaks. The sweet smell attracts vermin. Who often die. Which smells.

Oh, and don't forget to rub it with a warm oven mitt while you sip your hot grappa and tea.
 
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