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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For the last twenty or so years I always lubed my chain the way I was taught - the "standard way". That is , spraying the links under the swingarm.
Every now and again , usually at track days , I would see riders lubing the chain from behind . Having finally tried it for myself I can't see why everyone doesn't use this method. You can see exactly where the lube is going and there is no risk of over-spray ending up on the rear tyre.
Please direct any criticisms at my little helper.
 

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For the last twenty or so years I always lubed my chain the way I was taught - the "standard way". That is , spraying the links under the swingarm.
Every now and again , usually at track days , I would see riders lubing the chain from behind . Having finally tried it for myself I can't see why everyone doesn't use this method. You can see exactly where the lube is going and their is no risk of over-spray ending up on the rear tyre.
Please direct any criticisms at my little helper.

When I'm using a spray can of waxy type of lube.
That's the way I do it as well.

But only this method for a quick top up of lube.

I do it the other way as well after a good and thorough chain clean up.
It's the only way to get a reasonably uniform coating of some lube on the side plates of the chain to make it look good, and provide some rust prevention.

To minimise chain lube overspray when doing it the thorough way, I position a piece of cardboard, or a whole cardboard box with the side ripped open up behind the chain and between the chain and wheel as an overspray barrier.
When positioned as required, the whole box is better because it's stable as it stands on the ground next to the work area.
There's a lot less fiddling with it.
Anything to help work clean;)
 

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I use a stiff 1/4' wide paint brush and apply it by hand both sides with the bike on the rear stand, that way it goes where I want it and not all over the sprocket and wheel.
I do it twice, a heavy coat first which I wipe off with a rag held against the chain whilst I revolve the wheel by hand to clean any grime off then I do it again and very lightly hold a piece of paper kitchen on it to remove any excess which would only fling off.

Every few months I degrease the whole engine/swingarm and chain properly and then lube the chain as above.


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I've been using the same method Dirt mentioned, but I may switch to the below method as it sounds much more efficient with less waste. Always a pile of lube laying on the bottom part of the cardboard when I'm done, which wastes a lot.

I use a stiff 1/4' wide paint brush and apply it by hand both sides with the bike on the rear stand, that way it goes where I want it and not all over the sprocket and wheel.
I do it twice, a heavy coat first which I wipe off with a rag held against the chain whilst I revolve the wheel by hand to clean any grime off then I do it again and very lightly hold a piece of paper kitchen on it to remove any excess which would only fling off.

Every few months I degrease the whole engine/swingarm and chain properly and then lube the chain as above.


.
 

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I like to take mine off and scrub it really good once a month.

After I'm convinced it's clean, I hang it up on a nail and gently coat each roller with a Q-tip soaked in refined whale oil. O-rings last longer this way.

4 times a year I use the bench mounted buffer to polish the side plates before reoiling.

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I like to take mine off and scrub it really good once a month.

After I'm convinced it's clean, I hang it up on a nail and gently coat each roller with a Q-tip soaked in refined whale oil. O-rings last longer this way.

4 times a year I use the bench mounted buffer to polish the side plates before reoiling.

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When do you guys find time to ride?:D
 

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I like to take mine off and scrub it really good once a month.

After I'm convinced it's clean, I hang it up on a nail and gently coat each roller with a Q-tip soaked in refined whale oil. O-rings last longer this way.

4 times a year I use the bench mounted buffer to polish the side plates before reoiling.

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I'm guessing your using those suicide spring clip links then.

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I like to take mine off and scrub it really good once a month.

After I'm convinced it's clean, I hang it up on a nail and gently coat each roller with a Q-tip soaked in refined whale oil. O-rings last longer this way.

4 times a year I use the bench mounted buffer to polish the side plates before reoiling.

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Mental. :eek:
 

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My side plates are gold coloured so I don't buff them.

I'm against whaling so I use Silkolene chain gel :)

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I like to take mine off and scrub it really good once a month.

After I'm convinced it's clean, I hang it up on a nail and gently coat each roller with a Q-tip soaked in refined whale oil. O-rings last longer this way.

4 times a year I use the bench mounted buffer to polish the side plates before reoiling.

.
This reminds me of a guy a few years back describing how he checked his oil level. It involved a platform he made with eye hooks mounted to it, a series of tie down straps and a level... Not 100% convinced he was being serious either...

I wet a rag with WD40 or Kerosene for a quick wipe if it looks nasty enough, then lube the rollers with whatever I am using at the time. I was using the DuPont Teflon stuff that was very clean (chain fling wise), but I ran out and honestly I don't think it lasted all that long. I am now trying a Silkolene lube a guy recommended. Seems good so far.

I have also used plain WD40, which also worked well, but didn't last. I also know people who never lube an O Ring chain and get along just fine. They are wear items after all. I have no data to show how much longer one will last with proper maintenance compared to no maintenance. I am sure there is some difference, but where and how you ride probably has a bigger impact.

Neat way to lube, I suppose. I do it the "other way" but just because putting lube on the inside of the rollers where they meet the sprocket seems to make more sense. I know that is irrational, as a few times around and the lube is everywhere, but old habits are what they are!
 

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I spray the outside. Within 5 seconds it will capillary within the rollers nicely. Besides, rotating the wheel will coat the rollers. It's not that critical with the O ring chains as you can't get lube in the most critical parts which are the pins.
 

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What I have found with the heavier wax "lubes" is they tend to cause the rollers not to want to roll freely due to a sort of weld effect (not actual weld just sticky) between the end of the rollers and the inboard side of the side plates. Dupont Chain Saver does this. When I use that product, the rollers spin freely at first then the waxyness gums them up or something and they want to stick to the inner side of the side plates and not roll/spin easily. This causes the chain to feel slightly rough when riding, compared to a lighter non-waxy lube where the rollers continue to spin more freely even if the thin lube is fading away.

I can always tell when the rollers aren't spinning freely, there is this rough feeling I can detect to how the chain feels when riding. Not there with thin lubes or even with a dryish chain where the thin lube has mostly gone away (but noisier of course). This is why I prefer the thinner oilier new formula blue can Dupont Multiuse Lube to the Dupont Chain Saver.

To me the new blue can Dupont stuff is sort of like a slightly heavier WD40 with teflon in it. Chain stays cleaner with it than with the Chain Saver, too.
 

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Seriously, I use whatever falls to hand when I come in from a ride to oil my chain.

WD-40, light lubricants, 10wt oil...whatever.

My last two bikes have had black wheels, it blends in when it flings off. I love it.

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Seriously, I use whatever falls to hand when I come in from a ride to oil my chain.

WD-40, light lubricants, 10wt oil...whatever.

My last two bikes have had black wheels, it blends in when it flings off. I love it.

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What about when the lube gets flung up onto the back of your jacket, under the tail section and forward onto the frame and rear suspension.

Or is everything black;)
 

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Seriously it's a fricken chain clean it lube it when it's worn replace it for crying out loud whale oil!:think:
 

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What about when the lube gets flung up onto the back of your jacket, under the tail section and forward onto the frame and rear suspension.

Or is everything black;)
Yes...

Black 620/800 Multistrada with the chain guard/hugger from a 620 Monster.

No muck on my shock!

.
 
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