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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I’m wanting to change out the soft fork springs in my 95 900ss for .95’s (bit fat). I know Racetech, Hyperpro, Ikon and Wilbers do them but does anyone know if one is better than the other or an easier install - no spacers to cut etc. Also does anyone have experience with linear vs progressive. Or do we all just use Racetech as it appears.
Thanks in advance.
 

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I’ve only used RaceTech, but that’s because they had what I needed when I needed it. I wouldn’t hesitate to buy one of the others , though. I’ve never heard of any problems with any of them. You may as well choose by price and availability. Iirc, the upside down forks springs came with a spacer, while springs for the right side up forks did not. When needed I make spacers from pvc pipe. Springs in forks and shocks are supported better by closed and ground ends, so it’s better to have a short spring and make a spacer to get the right length. If they made them to full length you’d have to cut wire off if you needed to shorten them. That’s not the best way. It’s a lot easier to cut a spacer, and not a permanent change. If you need new spacers, pvc is cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your replies which make perfect sense. I’ll probably go with Racetech just because of the price and availability. This will be my first time pulling forks apart but this is why I bought this bike and I’m enjoying working on it. Luckily because it’s given me plenty to do.
Cheers,
 

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I've got Ohlins linear springs in mine.
Note that you will need to change your rear shock as well - to one that is either longer (SSie shock) or adjustable for length/ride height (Ohlins, etc). The linear springs take away a HUGE amount of sag from the OEM progressive ones, and that significantly affects the steering and front tyre wear too - mine started chewing out the sides of my front tyres badly, until I raised the rear enough.
 
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Any straight rate because you want to set them up for your weight not a one size fits most which is what a progressive is used for.

You will need to measure and set internal preload on any of them as there are very few that start at the internal preload length we want.
 

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Totally agree about the straight wound vs progressive wound. Most oem springs have a dual rate, strictly speaking. There is a lower rate portion ( coils closer) transitioning to a higher rate portion after the first couple of inches of travel . Progressive Suspension springs are different than this, because they use a lot more of the spring to transition to the highest rate portion. They can give a softer ride than a single rate spring or a dual rate spring, but they’re really for comfort because the rate of the spring is going to be soft in the normal travel range .if you are ever tempted to use them set your sag near the minimum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks again. Based on your replies I’ll definitely go linear. I already switched out the rear shock for an Ohlins and raised the rear which is what really showed the weakness in the front.
Cheers,
 

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Thanks again. Based on your replies I’ll definitely go linear. I already switched out the rear shock for an Ohlins and raised the rear which is what really showed the weakness in the front.
Cheers,
If you've gone to the effort and expense of installing an Ohlins rear shock, you may want to think hard about upgrading the front more than just springs. As you may know, the Showa adjustable forks on your bike are flawed, in that any adjustment to the rebound circuit affects (neuters, actually) the compression circuit. It's a design flaw, you may decide to live with it but it makes setting up the forks really difficult, lots of guess and check because of the lack of independence between the rebound and compression damping circuits. There are fixes, the easiest and cheapest of which is to replace the stock cartridges with carts from a Suzuki GSX-R 600/750 from model year 04 or 05. I and others have done write-ups with pictures, etc.

Here's an old write-up on the hows and whys: Showa Monster Front Forks

Here's some chat about the mod: https://www.ducati.ms/forums/57-supersport/678530-fork-spring-removal-93-900ss.html
 

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I did that on my SS. You need to stick with single rate springs for the SS forks because GSXR springs are too large in diameter. It’s an easy mod. I found it cheaper to buy the complete fork legs than just the internals.
 

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I did that on my SS. You need to stick with single rate springs for the SS forks because GSXR springs are too large in diameter. It’s an easy mod. I found it cheaper to buy the complete fork legs than just the internals.
Sorry, yes, you'll still need upgraded springs, and you may need to play around with spacers for initial preload. I think the forks I bought to do mine (also yes = cheaper to buy the whole fork legs, MAKE SURE they are not bent before you buy them as there are an awful lot of parts off wrecked bikes) were about $60 on that auction site.
 

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Another plug for racetech here. I think any spring selected for your weight will be an improvement, and the install would be similar for each.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks I appreciate your input. I was considering the Racetech goldvalves but will look into the ideas that you mentioned as well.
Cheers,
 

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I don’t believe the Racetech gold valves get rid of the problem of the rebound adjustment influencing compression damping.
 

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No, it doesn’t. But it does do a better job of balancing the relationship of the compression and rebound damping. The Goldvalve comes with enough shims that you can adjust it to suit.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Were it my own bike I would spring it first and IF (and only if) you have issues with high speed compression bumps such as frost heaves and pot holes I would just valve it. Yes there is overlap between circuits (just like the majority of Ohlins shocks) but for MOST it is not an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I’ve got my eye on a few sets of Gixxer forks and will go that road it they come off. If not I’ll probably just change the springs and see how it goes. I really don’t mind doing it twice or even 3 times if I need to. I quite like pulling it apart.

Appreciate all of your comments. I’ll let you know how it works out.
 

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You’ll want the springs when you do the GSXR mod anyway, and they’re an improvement on their own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
I’ve ordered the Rece Tech linear springs. I’m still looking into the Gsxr cartridges. I’ve read conflicting reports regarding 03 gsxr cartridges being very good and also not fitting. From what I can see they seem to be upside down forks on the 750 as per the attached picture of the internals does anyone know about this?
 

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