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Looking at following the recomendations on this website to rewire the stator on my 1997 916 with 10 g wire, but most recommendations suggest special wiring with high temp/oil/gas resistant coating. Where do I source that?

Any suggestions would be welcomed!
 

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Looking at following the recomendations on this website to rewire the stator on my 1997 916 with 10 g wire, but most recommendations suggest special wiring with high temp/oil/gas resistant coating. Where do I source that?

Any suggestions would be welcomed!
Probably cheaper just to buy a used stator? But if you have a local motor winding shop near you they could probably hook you up instead of having to buy a full roll.
 

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Old Wizard
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The main issue with replacing the stator wires is to reduce the electrical heating from the 30+ amp current they have to carry. A different aspect of this is that any in-line connector becomes a hot spot because, as corrosion occurs, that causes the connector resistance to increase and the heat generated to increase in this region. This damages the connector (melts the plastic ones) and overheats a few inches of wire both sides of the connector.

But that’s not the whole issue. Any wire, no matter what size, has resistance (so many ohms per foot) so any wire will heat up. Obviously the larger the wire, the less resistance it will have to current flow, and the less heating that will occur for a given current.

The type of insulation on the wire is also important to this discussion. Different materials have different temperature allowables for continuous operation. For example for 10 gauge (AWG) wire in 30ºC (86ºF) free air:

55A will heat high density polypropylene to 90ºC allowable
58A will heat Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) insulation to 105ºC allowable
75A will heat Kapton, Teflon, and Silicone insulation to 200ºC allowable

So, silicone insulated wire should be used for higher current ratings or hotter operating environments.

But to answer your question ...

If you're relocating your regulator to behind the license plate (which I strongly recommend) then the wires are routed outside (the hot environment inside the fairing) so use AWG 12 gauge PVC-insulated wire.

If you're keeping the stock regulator location, use AWG 10 gauge. Use Kapton, Teflon, or silicone insulated wire if you can find it (McMaster-Carr), but PVC-coated wire from Radio Shack will work, at least for a good while.
 

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I've had good success with car audio power cable such as Streetwires. Be sure to upgrade the grounds as well as the power wires if you go that route.
 

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Be sure to use stranded core wire and not solid core. If you are adding length to the oem wire, then you need to go up in wire size by at least one gauge. I would use silicone insulated wire.
 

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I used the wire in the attached link and replaced it all the way back to the stator. I know it's only 12ga--but the quality is unbelievable. It has a silicone jacket and is sold by the foot. I used this in conjunction with motowheels upgraded battery cable kit on my 1995 916 and haven't had a charging/electrical problem since.......

http://www.robotmarketplace.com/products/0C-WSD01R.html
 

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I used the wire in the attached link and replaced it all the way back to the stator. I know it's only 12ga--but the quality is unbelievable. It has a silicone jacket and is sold by the foot. I used this in conjunction with motowheels upgraded battery cable kit on my 1995 916 and haven't had a charging/electrical problem since.......

http://www.robotmarketplace.com/products/0C-WSD01R.html
That's a good choice, but expensive. Do the stator wires to the regulator carry DC or AC current? I don't know enough about the charging system to know the answer, but it makes a difference in terms of choosing wire size. Wire for DC has to be heavier than wire for AC, for the same power throughput, etc. Edison found that out the hard way over 100 years ago...
 

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That's a good choice, but expensive. Do the stator wires to the regulator carry DC or AC current? I don't know enough about the charging system to know the answer, but it makes a difference in terms of choosing wire size. Wire for DC has to be heavier than wire for AC, for the same power throughput, etc. Edison found that out the hard way over 100 years ago...
Generator -- there is no rectifier -- unless it's built into the VR?..
 

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Hello,
You may source high-temperature cables with resistance to oil, gas, chemicals, weather, and abrasion at Allied Wire and Cable.
Cheers
 
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