Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So the other day I was in my BMW at the light before the freeway. A Suzuki pulls up next to me and the light turns green. He takes off, pops a wheelie about 18 inches off the ground, and when his front wheel comes down his bike wiggles noticeable (I can see it from behind), and he takes off.

My question is 1) why did it wiggle, and 2) what is the right thing to do in that situation? Slow down and have it settle, or twist it hard and take off?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
274 Posts
Keep both wheels on the ground, times are faster that way anyhow....
But seriously, It is from the tire in the front spinning slower than the pavement speed.
Wheely head shake can be fixed by, adding or changing to a adjustable steering damper. I have noticed that shorter bikes tend to have wheely head shake more often then a bike that is slightly longer. For example the 2006 kawa zx10r was a shorty little bike and had aweful head shake when the front tire was on pavement at full acceleration.
To answer your question best the situation dictates the action.
If you experiance head shake from a hard throttle take off with marginal wheel lift it is best to stay hard on the grip keeping the front tire light to catch up to speed, conversly if you are performing a full wheel stand for a prolonged period of time and you know your front tire is going slower than the pavement you want to chop the throttle and let the tire settle hard on the pavement which puts maximum pressure on your tire fast ( other wise you will experiance the DEATH wobble and It can throw ya), this is very very hard on your forks, wheels and just plain immature.
All of this comming from years of riding and learning the hard way about stupid stunts.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
9,757 Posts
If the guy popped a wheelie and he wiggled coming down it's cause his over-enthusiastic ass didn't have the bars straight as he landed, so when he came down the bike had to straighten itself out (think shopping cart wheels righting themselves). Not exactly a tank slapper, but the dynamics are the same (just a different cause). I've seen and performed some pretty high speed wheelies and the bars did not wobble provided they were straight upon landing.

The proper thing to do is to keep going and let the bike right itself (don't even need to speed up in that situation really). I've always wondered though, does a loose steering damper help in that situation, or a really stiff one? Think about it, if your steering damper is at full stiff it is really hard to turn the bars, so theoretically if you came down with the bars sideways they'd take longer to right themselves. A stiff damper setting is good if you've got weave from an aggressive setup, but this kind of tank slaper occurs at a speed and trajectory where the bike has no problem righting itself.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
+1^^. Comes from the front wheel not being straight when landing. I learned the hard way unfortunately. Tank slapper that bucked me right off onto my face. Learned to always have the wheel straight when coming down. So if this squid had a baby tank slapper from just taking off, he will soon learn the hard way.

Shazaam has a great write up about tank slappers in the Halls of Wisom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
If you ever get into a tank slap situation, first thing is pull in clutch. This has been tested many time coming out of turn 9 at Summit Point with a very unhappy RC-51 trying to buck me off. Works everytime. Knock on wood!
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top