Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,345 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a coworker interested in selling his 999... it looks like it's in great shape, 4,000 miles. He has an issue with the fuel pump wiring that's not completely resolved (right now he's using the fuel level wires through the flange to run the pump, but he has bought another pump used from Germany). Anyone with experience know what a fair price would be for the bike? Online I see prices all over the place for 999's.

 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
First-gen 999 with known mechanical/electrical issues and 4000 miles? I would think $4500 max.

I assume if he hasn't fixed the fuel pump that other maintenance has also been deferred and it is riding around on older tires.

Fix the issues and get it current on maintenance and it would be $6k-ish I think with all three keys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
With the pump failure and upcoming service, imho max $3500.

If everything is fixed $6k-ish.

To have the service done and fix the pump, probably around $1500.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,476 Posts
If they have the pump working off the fuel level wires it is not the pump but the wiring in the pump flange. This part it not sold from ducati but california cycleworks does have one. I have not used the cycleworks version but it is much cheaper than oem.

Around here (northeast) 749/999 are rare to see and often north of $5000 most need something such as service and tires so I do not see a price drop due to those items. I just had a customer inspect a bike yesterday and the dealer sent the used bike (1098) out with tires from 2009. buyers should know what they are buying and pay what they are comfortable with. Some would rather have lower miles and good physical condition than higher miles and new tires/service done if it is not as nice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,345 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If they have the pump working off the fuel level wires it is not the pump but the wiring in the pump flange. This part it not sold from ducati but california cycleworks does have one. I have not used the cycleworks version but it is much cheaper than oem.

Around here (northeast) 749/999 are rare to see and often north of $5000 most need something such as service and tires so I do not see a price drop due to those items. I just had a customer inspect a bike yesterday and the dealer sent the used bike (1098) out with tires from 2009. buyers should know what they are buying and pay what they are comfortable with. Some would rather have lower miles and good physical condition than higher miles and new tires/service done if it is not as nice.
Definitely the flange not the pump... but I'd have to fix it (he has the part to do it but has not taken it apart to actually do it yet). He's asking $6k, sounds like I need to find out how far from service it is, how old the tires are, etc. He (obviously) doesn't put many miles on the bike so I suspect he services the bike based on time rather than miles... and with 4k miles he'd probably need to change tires based on age too or have very old tires mounted. Since he rides it to work once a year or so I've not even seen it in a few years.

He's the kind of guy who I'm sure takes care of his toys... but I guess I need to get the particulars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,995 Posts
$5.2K max with no issues. I saw an 05 999S is great condition go for $6.4k the other day. A much better machine.

But we know to sell high and allow negotiation to go down, b/c you cannot negotiate up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
I see no harm in offering lower figure. People take these too personally sometimes. I'm sure there isn't a queue of buyers lining for it either + you got you reasons for lower figure anyway.

It seems to have zero aftermarket parts and since it's not a collectible rare once in a lifetime bike that's also something to keep in mind.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,345 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I see no harm in offering lower figure. People take these too personally sometimes. I'm sure there isn't a queue of buyers lining for it either + you got you reasons for lower figure anyway.

It seems to have zero aftermarket parts and since it's not a collectible rare once in a lifetime bike that's also something to keep in mind.
Yea its stock (though I'd have thought the pillion seat would be black)... and I generally do see that as a good thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
Not necessarily a bad thing - I'd rather have a bone stock one than something that's been decorated with red anodized eBay tat, tacky rim decals and neon lights by half a dozen cholos any day...
Fair point, but usually ppl keep those OEM parts anyway in shelf. But yeah, unless it's Ducati Performance or other high quality stuff they are more or less worthless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
Yea its stock (though I'd have thought the pillion seat would be black)... and I generally do see that as a good thing.
03/04 are red. Or should I say orange-red eventually. I replaced mine with black years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
One thing to look at in the market is that early 848 and 1098 are getting in the same price range. You can use that fact to bargain hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
One thing to look at in the market is that early 848 and 1098 are getting in the same price range. You can use that fact to bargain hard.
Here is the worthless opinion from a random person. There are 2 ways to look at a purchase like this, each one is valid.

You want to own a kick ass bike to enjoy personally, fuck anything else. In which case, a 999 Biposto may be ideal. It's one of the least popular of all superbikes, in the least desirable version IMO, in the "worst" year for the generation in some peoples opinion. What that means is that you get to pay the least, for the same internal mechanicals as most other versions, you'll love it.

You want to own something special, to enjoy care for and eventually pass on to someone else. In which case I think this bike sucks. There may be something to be said for being the only "pure" year of the 999 as envisioned by Terblanche. However I don't think collectors will think of a base model Biposto for the museum. Instead I'd look for an S or R, with almost no miles and I'd just park it and hope for the best.

IMO, the best buy in the 999 world, is probably a base model 05' 999 mono. You get the slightly modified looks, the far superior swingarm and in base trim a 999 Mono is affordable and kick ass looking. You want something both desirable and "rare". Rare we can't deal with and plan for, but desirable we can. Mono always looks better, hence, worth more. 04' 999 Mono, no miles = museum. For price and fun, 05', new swinger and better face. Maybe the best version would be the final year 999s, red Mono, just in terms of the final iteration of this generation.

If you want to make money, your gonna need to buy an R at the maximum or a race rep for a minimum.

As for the 1098 bikes, I'm super curious as to where they will fall in value and history. They are a rapid face-lift for the failed 999 design. In my opinion, they are aging quite a bit worse, they look old and heavy as compared. The longer time passes, the less special they seem to become, and the "999" bikes seem to become a bit more special. They, like the 999, don't seem to fit. But where the 999 is original as fuck, it's very clear the 1098 was designed to pull 916 heart strings and I don't think in the long haul that will play as well. How can the 1098 look so much more bulky than the 998 or 999? Pretty bike, sure. Beautiful, maybe. 80s..................perhaps.

I don't imagine the same fate (Maybe they are incredibly beautiful?) will fall the Terblanche Multistradas, if so, buy them now as they are DIRT CHEAP.
I dunno if this helps but when I buy a bike I'm always trying to think of who I will give it to next. We don't own these bikes, we borrow them, waste money on them, and them pass them on to their next lover. So it's important to think of the bikes place in desirability overall. Otherwise, buy a salvage title, mode it up, ride the fuck out of it and throw it in a ditch when it dies. :)

p.s. I would also say that the 999 has that strange as box exhaust. So any bikes that come with full Termis or 1/2 Termis are super desirable. Nobody, looking into the future, is going to want a bike with anything other than stock or Termi. I've seen quite a few 999 bikes with modified asses with Remus exhaust, strange fairings in the style of the Desmodichi and such. Let the bike be what it is, keep it stock, Termis MAXIMUM or else the value goes in the tank. I don't think anyone but Termignoni made an exhaust in the same exact shape as factory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
p.s. I would also say that the 999 has that strange as box exhaust. So any bikes that come with full Termis or 1/2 Termis are super desirable. Nobody, looking into the future, is going to want a bike with anything other than stock or Termi. I've seen quite a few 999 bikes with modified asses with Remus exhaust, strange fairings in the style of the Desmodichi and such. Let the bike be what it is, keep it stock, Termis MAXIMUM or else the value goes in the tank. I don't think anyone but Termignoni made an exhaust in the same exact shape as factory.
Have to disagree on this one and I think the market disagrees with you too. Leo Vince, Akrapovic, Zard at least made high quality systems that had similar spirit to the Termignoni race exhaust which IMO is the real deal this bike deserves. Termignoni's street exhaust is rather bulky even if it fits nicely under the seat. Then again there was whole bunch of ugly dual slip on cans, but that's another thing.

Btw I was looking for Panigale V4 exhausts the other day and god damn they are expensive as fuck. 7 grand for a full system :surprise: I think the systems are too complex or expensive to build since that kind of money is ridiculous. 3+ grand and you got the best there was for a 999.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
Have to disagree on this one and I think the market disagrees with you too. Leo Vince, Akrapovic, Zard at least made high quality systems that had similar spirit to the Termignoni race exhaust which IMO is the real deal this bike deserves. Termignoni's street exhaust is rather bulky even if it fits nicely under the seat. Then again there was whole bunch of ugly dual slip on cans, but that's another thing.

Btw I was looking for Panigale V4 exhausts the other day and god damn they are expensive as fuck. 7 grand for a full system :surprise: I think the systems are too complex or expensive to build since that kind of money is ridiculous. 3+ grand and you got the best there was for a 999.
Fair enough, and I agree that the quality of the systems is not an issue. But it's a matter of desire and branding, fact is Termis mean zero drop in value and perhaps a tiny increase. There is not a single other brand of exhaust you can put on a bike and sell it for MORE money due to the brand of exhaust. I think looks matter, and only Termi (till I'm disproven) look factory. I believe Leo and Zard made kinda a singular long ass tube exhaust, like an oblong version of a standard canister. I duno, not great looking under a factory Mono tail.

Of course IMO :)

I just bought a 2002 748s with an Arrow exhaust. Arrow is period correct and if you didn't want to pay for Termis in 2002, you bought Arrows. That being said, I'd trade it today for Termis.

p.s. 7G for V4 full system, fuck off. I'll take 1 998 with 300 miles for 7G instead. First Gen V4 will be the WORST V4 of all V4 as of next year. Just wait it out, let someone else pay for all the upgrades. Come to me my precious.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Have to disagree on this one and I think the market disagrees with you too. Leo Vince, Akrapovic, Zard at least made high quality systems that had similar spirit to the Termignoni race exhaust which IMO is the real deal this bike deserves. Termignoni's street exhaust is rather bulky even if it fits nicely under the seat. Then again there was whole bunch of ugly dual slip on cans, but that's another thing.

Btw I was looking for Panigale V4 exhausts the other day and god damn they are expensive as fuck. 7 grand for a full system :surprise: I think the systems are too complex or expensive to build since that kind of money is ridiculous. 3+ grand and you got the best there was for a 999.
There's plenty of sites that have them in the $4k range, which is still pretty expensive, but it's still not 7k. Full termi on motowheels and bellissimoto are like $4200 with the upmap. There's a few others in the $2800-3600 range depending on brand, the full akra is about $4800 I think.

As for the price on the 999, I'd say 4500-5k would be fair if you can get him down there, better to see it go to a good home than to some random for the same price most likely.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,476 Posts
Also keep in mind people love to post up prices that are often the lowest they have seen with little regard to condition and care. as a mechanic I can tell you buying a well cared for machine will save thousands on the other end of the sale so no matter what is paid decide if you are looking for a project with low upfront cost or a bike that is pretty much ready to go.

Given the miles on the 999 here it will likely need belts and tires due to age before being used. the full tune is at 6500 which gives you time to decide if you like it enough to keep it before spending the money. The bike looks to be mostly a unmolested version of what you would buy in 2004 with all the benefits and downsides to those bikes. someone who does not like those bikes clearly should not buy it but if you do like the early 999 then I would think this is a safe bet.

I think his $6000 might be a little high with the wiring issue but if the part is in hand then he should fix it before the sale if he wants to get that money. Otherwise given the things probably needed soon (tires,pump wires and belts) that's is about $1000 so there is that. Know that there are aftermarket belts but oem 999 belts are the most expensive Ducati belts about $225 last I checked.

The later swingarm was a beefier swingarm for sure and most prefer it for the looks but I have no doubt that no one on this forum is capable of out-riding the one that comes on this bike. Cosmetics matter but that's all it is for 99% of riders. Also know the 999 series is one of the better superbikes for a tall rider with an adjustable chassis that you do not get on a standard 1098 ,1198 or Pani.
No it is not as fast but you have to ask yourself truly are you?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,345 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
To be honest I'm not a superbike guy... but I know the owner (coworker) and he's a very careful/detail oriented guy (Engineers tend to fit a stereotype) so I know he's taken care of it. This would (for me) be a cheap bike that I could ride for a bit to see what I think, and if I like it I can use it to learn more about riding superbikes and maybe my next new bike purchase which was going to be a Tuono Factory might turn into a Pani. I'm getting older but I don't have joint issues so I could handle the posture for weekend warrior activities. As for desirability, I get why it's not seen in the same light as the earlier 998's (which are much less challenging/risky styling) but I've always seemed to gravitate toward vehicles that some people think are ugly (take the Multistrada for instance). I think the 999 is definitely odd looking but in an interesting way - from the stacked headlights (which I kindof like) to the grey frame and wheels (which would have to grow on me).

I'd not be buying it for a museum piece... I tend to ride the hell out of things and so never worry about resale value. That would be different if I was buying a bike as an investment - but I don't know enough about the superbike market to make an intelligent call there so my investments do not include bikes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,226 Posts
As a 999 owner, I have to say that the 999 is a very nice bike for the OP to try and great transition into super bike riding/ownership. Granted, I own a 2006 999R so a fair amount of changes from the bike in question but the 999 is a truly wonderful bike that is really underrated. It's fairly gentle as far as position and such go and it has a great motor that I personally love. I have thought about picking up an S or something to put bags on and do some sport touring.

Ducvet's post is spot on - every bit of it. Furthermore, the OP's reasoning is sound and, once sorted, this seems like a super bike to jump into superbike ownership with (see what I did there?).
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top