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Just found this bike with the following serial numbers just behind the headlight stamped on front tube: top row..DM750S*756056, second row below this stamped line...DGM-9595. Haven't found the engine yet, stored in another building. Thank you, I am a new member and think this 750 could be fun to bring back to working life...my second ever bike! What do I have here and what could be the retail restored value?
 

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It's most likely a late 1974 750 GT. "Retail" on a 750 GT that's been RESTORED could be in the teens. If it's a Sport it could go to mid 20s.

Before you get too excited you should know a few things. "Restore" is not the same as "rebuild". Bikes that are simply rebuilt, i.e. not in stock form with regards to paint and components, are not worth as much.

And now I'm going to make a few assumptions... having said this is your second bike ever, you haven't got any experience rebuilding them. So you're going to need a lot of help, as in, you'll have to farm out a lot of the work.

This gets expensive fast. If you are truly wanting to restore it, you'll need to have the work done by people who know what they're doing. There aren't many, and they aren't cheap. Even rebuilding it you have to find a shop familiar with them, and not every town has one.

Maybe I'm wrong, you're quite the talented mechanic. Great. Is the engine complete? If it is, and you are doing the majority of the work, budget about $5000 for the engine rebuild. If the engine is missing a sidecover, add about $1200 to that number. I don't know how experienced you are with engines, but the prices on bevel parts will about choke a guy who's used to working on small block V8s.

Bottom line, if you want to do a decent rebuild on a roundcase (A 1974 or earlier bevel twin) you should be willing to spend $10k doing it. More if it's a basket case. Less if you're ok with using spray cans to paint it, reusing parts that are "probably" good, etc.

Still with me? Great. So here's the good news. The bevel Ducs have a very loyal following and there is a huge amount of support out there for people who undertake projects like this. For starters, try the bevelheads mailing list.

http://micapeak.com/mailman/listinfo/BevelHeads/

There is a huge amount of experience on the list and the people there can help you avoid costly mistakes.

There are a few books you can look at to get an idea of what you're dealing with. A couple you might start with are;

The Ducati 750 Bible (Ian Falloon, who's on the bevelhead list)
The Standard catalog of Ducati Motorcycles (Falloon, again)

Before you even touch the bike you need to buy a manual. Maybe two manuals. DO NOT start pulling the engine apart before you research what's inside. It is NOT a small block Chevy, you can't just rip it apart, install a $1000 rebuild kit from JC Whitney, and bolt it back together.

There is also a parts manual you will need if you decide to embark on the journey. They are worth the cost, trust me.

If you are serious about rebuilding this, buy the 750 Bible and start reading. Get on the list. Start saving your money...

Contrary to what it might seem, I'm not trying to talk you out of doing this. I'm just saying it's going to be expensive, and it's going to take a long time.

I started with a more or less complete but non-running bike. I've been playing with cars/bikes for years, have access to tools most people don't, and it still took me over three years (I took time off) and $10,000 to rebuild my bike. I figure it's worth about what I have into it, but when I started on it I was fully expecting to have about $4k more into it than what it was worth (prices went up, a lot, while I was building it)

Also, there are people who will tell you they've rebuilt GTs for much less (Hi Tom!). Yes, and those people typically have experience and/or aren't rebuilding the engine.

It sounds like you have the start of what could be a great project there. I just wonder if you realize how much of a project it is... If you take it on, more power to you. If you think it'll be like putting a 350 Honda together... um... we need to talk... :p
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My 750

Craig, thank you for all your comments. I don't know exactly how you deduced that the year was '74, perhaps you could tell me about those serial numbers you interpreted.

As to the restoration: You're more than correct, for this bike seems to be missing many parts, all of which will cost more money (I suspect) than what the finished product might command, especially for discerning Ducati owners.

However, I am waiting to see what can be found from those places where the "remainder of parts" were placed many years ago. My gut feeling is that this bike will be a donor unit unless those missing parts can be found and are in more than decent shape.

Therefore, it is more than important for me to know what year this bike is. Perhaps if the engine is supplied I'll be able to use those numbers.

I did realize that one carb was left on the bike, it was a Dellorto. There is the long full seat too.

Again, thanks for responding, and if you have any more info, advice too, write on! Making a smart move is my first goal, getting buried I've done before and know what that can cost! RJ
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My 750

Craig, I also forgot to mention that I did notice on the front fork what appeared to be twin set of disc brakes, one was present, the other unit (right hand) was missing while the attachment holes showed it had been previously installed. RJ
 

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As Desmo Dog stated it is a late 74.I have a 750 that is registered as a 75 and is 92 units past yours.The bikes were probably re stickered at Berliner when they were leftover from 74.Because of federal requirements all bikes from 75 on had to have lefthand shift with a 1 down4 up pattern.So these 74bikes were sort of illegal but due to the vast numbers sold[probably 200 or so] they kinda slipped through the cracks.The late 750 had the Marzocchi forks finished in black and had caliper mounting lugs on both legs.They also had the wonderfully reliable block style CEV switches as fitted to the 860 models along with the 860 wiring harness.Both are considered hallmarks of design but not of the electrical variety.Properly sorted they are wonderful bikes to ride but parts are hard to come by and often at heart stopping prices.
 

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RJ,

I'm guessing the year from the frame number. The ranges for the different build dates is listed in the Ducati 750 Bible I mentioned. Strangely enough I went to compare your frame number to mine, and... my frame number is WAY too early to be a late '74, but all equipment on the bike says late '74. To add to the mystery... the bike is titled as a 73, which I always thought was a mistake along the line somewhere but now I'm wondering...

Anyway... as mentioned, GTs didn't come with dual disks but they are set up to use them. Also, a 30mm Dellorto would indicate it's a GT, a 32 means it could be a sport, or the guy could have switched to larger carbs (I did)

This is one of the original carbs, the 30 indicates size.


If you want to see some details of my project bike, go here:
http://www.teamyikes.com/RC/RoundcaseHome.html

as for parts being in good shape... don't be too quick to judge what's good and bad. some of it can look pretty ratty but is still useable. In my case, I wasn't going for a factory stock restoration. I was building the bike the way I wanted it to be, and if a few of the parts showed some scars, so be it.

Here are the before and after shots of mine:





It's been posted here before, i hope long time listers aren't getting too sick of seeing it! :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for info on 750 bike

Hey, I want to thank the respondents for the information you were kind enough to provide. It has given me the right energy to focus on the smart potential for this bike. What I have garnered is that the smart move is to use a pencil running the numbers first prior to any effective gaming. I intend to do this right after we exhaust all efforts to locate those parts supposed to be there, albeit in boxes in different buildings. Will keep you posted.
 

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I trust you have contacted Tom Rolland right there in town ?


Hey, I want to thank the respondents for the information you were kind enough to provide. It has given me the right energy to focus on the smart potential for this bike. What I have garnered is that the smart move is to use a pencil running the numbers first prior to any effective gaming. I intend to do this right after we exhaust all efforts to locate those parts supposed to be there, albeit in boxes in different buildings. Will keep you posted.
 

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It's been posted here before, i hope long time listers aren't getting too sick of seeing it! :eek:
I only get sick when I start thinking I should have never sold it. But, honestly, if I had kept it, it would probably still be sitting in a corner. You took on a tremendous task, and did an excellent job on the old girl.
 

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I only get sick when I start thinking I should have never sold it. But, honestly, if I had kept it, it would probably still be sitting in a corner. You took on a tremendous task, and did an excellent job on the old girl.
I'm having a senior moment here. Are you the guy who sold it to Scott??? If so I remember exchanging e-mails but don't think it was here so I didn't recognize your screen name.

BTW - not to highjack this post but I've discovered that the frame number is for a '73, yet the mechanicals are all from a late '74, the last '74s built. The thing is, it's titled as a '73 too. I wish I had the history on it from new, but that's a bit much to hope for on a 35 year old bike.
 

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I'm having a senior moment here. Are you the guy who sold it to Scott??? If so I remember exchanging e-mails but don't think it was here so I didn't recognize your screen name.

BTW - not to highjack this post but I've discovered that the frame number is for a '73, yet the mechanicals are all from a late '74, the last '74s built. The thing is, it's titled as a '73 too. I wish I had the history on it from new, but that's a bit much to hope for on a 35 year old bike.
Yeah, I sold it to Scott back when he was working for Victory, or as we tell him...when he was worshipping Arlen Ness :)

The only history I have is what the man who sold it to me could recall. It was his uncle's bike. The uncle would store the GT in the barn of the man's father each winter, and come get it out in the spring. As time passed the uncle would put it up a little earlier...and get it out a little later. After several years, one spring the uncle didn't come and get it out, by then the man who told me this story had grown up and moved into his own place. The bike just sat there all those years. When the father passed, the son inherited the place. He was cleaning the place up, and decided that it was time to empty out the old barn. I saw the ad he placed in our local Auto Trader magazine, by chance I picked up the magazine on the first day it was out. The ad listed it as "1973 Ducati 750 - $500" (I think, whatever the price was, it wasn't a lot). I just about shit my pants. Visions of an immaculate greenframe ran thru my mind, left by some unfortunate soul, who through some twist of fate had been paralyzed or killed in a car accident and now some clueless relative was selling it...needless to say, the first sight was a let down. I offered him $250, he balked, I said something like: "well thanks anyway" and turned to leave. He decided he should take the $250 from the idiot who would give anything for the reeking heap.

A few other twists along the way delivered the GT into your hands.

The license plate frame on the bike was probably where the uncle bought the bike, most likely used. I don't think "Duane's Cycle Shop" in Marion, IN. was a Ducati dealership. There was a Ducati dealership in Burr Oak, IN from the 60's until the mid 80's when Ducati faded away (briefly) The shop remained open as an independant repair shop until the mid 90's. If I was a betting man, I'd say the bike was bought there when it was new.
 

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...I offered him $250, he balked, I said something like: "well thanks anyway" and turned to leave. He decided he should take the $250 from the idiot who would give anything for the reeking heap.
Cool, thanks for the info!

If it makes you feel any better, I've a got a little over $250 into it at this point.

About 40 times that, give or take about $250... :eek:

Seriously, I think I have spent more than that just in shipping on the parts!

BTW - are you going to be at the MotoGP in September? It will likely be there. It got a little trashed there last year though, the rain really did a number on the finish of a lot of the parts, I haven't had time to deal with it yet so it's looking kinda tacky... and the tach needle broke off this spring so I've got that to fix too...
 

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BTW - are you going to be at the MotoGP in September? It will likely be there. It got a little trashed there last year though, the rain really did a number on the finish of a lot of the parts, I haven't had time to deal with it yet so it's looking kinda tacky... and the tach needle broke off this spring so I've got that to fix too...

Yes we have tickets. We have a sweet campsight on 1000 E, a friend of John's family has some farm acreage just at the edge of a housing addition. The farmhouse was torn down years ago, but there is a large barn still there. We park the motorhomes and campers in a half circle, designate a firepit area and park all the bikes inside the barn. Last year when Ike was blowing bikes over, we knew the weather was going to be bad sunday, so we left the bikes in the barn and drove a couple of trucks to IMS.

Dean talked to Scott a week or two ago, I'm pretty sure Scott told him he was going to make it down.
 

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sheesh there Craig, did you forget I am in Albuquerque? Tom

It's most likely a late 1974 750 GT. "Retail" on a 750 GT that's been RESTORED could be in the teens. If it's a Sport it could go to mid 20s.

Before you get too excited you should know a few things. "Restore" is not the same as "rebuild". Bikes that are simply rebuilt, i.e. not in stock form with regards to paint and components, are not worth as much.

And now I'm going to make a few assumptions... having said this is your second bike ever, you haven't got any experience rebuilding them. So you're going to need a lot of help, as in, you'll have to farm out a lot of the work.

This gets expensive fast. If you are truly wanting to restore it, you'll need to have the work done by people who know what they're doing. There aren't many, and they aren't cheap. Even rebuilding it you have to find a shop familiar with them, and not every town has one.

Maybe I'm wrong, you're quite the talented mechanic. Great. Is the engine complete? If it is, and you are doing the majority of the work, budget about $5000 for the engine rebuild. If the engine is missing a sidecover, add about $1200 to that number. I don't know how experienced you are with engines, but the prices on bevel parts will about choke a guy who's used to working on small block V8s.

Bottom line, if you want to do a decent rebuild on a roundcase (A 1974 or earlier bevel twin) you should be willing to spend $10k doing it. More if it's a basket case. Less if you're ok with using spray cans to paint it, reusing parts that are "probably" good, etc.

Still with me? Great. So here's the good news. The bevel Ducs have a very loyal following and there is a huge amount of support out there for people who undertake projects like this. For starters, try the bevelheads mailing list.

http://micapeak.com/mailman/listinfo/BevelHeads/

There is a huge amount of experience on the list and the people there can help you avoid costly mistakes.

There are a few books you can look at to get an idea of what you're dealing with. A couple you might start with are;

The Ducati 750 Bible (Ian Falloon, who's on the bevelhead list)
The Standard catalog of Ducati Motorcycles (Falloon, again)

Before you even touch the bike you need to buy a manual. Maybe two manuals. DO NOT start pulling the engine apart before you research what's inside. It is NOT a small block Chevy, you can't just rip it apart, install a $1000 rebuild kit from JC Whitney, and bolt it back together.

There is also a parts manual you will need if you decide to embark on the journey. They are worth the cost, trust me.

If you are serious about rebuilding this, buy the 750 Bible and start reading. Get on the list. Start saving your money...

Contrary to what it might seem, I'm not trying to talk you out of doing this. I'm just saying it's going to be expensive, and it's going to take a long time.

I started with a more or less complete but non-running bike. I've been playing with cars/bikes for years, have access to tools most people don't, and it still took me over three years (I took time off) and $10,000 to rebuild my bike. I figure it's worth about what I have into it, but when I started on it I was fully expecting to have about $4k more into it than what it was worth (prices went up, a lot, while I was building it)

Also, there are people who will tell you they've rebuilt GTs for much less (Hi Tom!). Yes, and those people typically have experience and/or aren't rebuilding the engine.

It sounds like you have the start of what could be a great project there. I just wonder if you realize how much of a project it is... If you take it on, more power to you. If you think it'll be like putting a 350 Honda together... um... we need to talk... :p
 

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750 Gt with big t...............

Nice bike to ride!

My one came with a Norwegian girl who had huge tits that pressed into your back.
Those were the days!
Blond , clear skin and great big tits!

C F
 

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sheesh there Craig, did you forget I am in Albuquerque? Tom
Hi Tom, glad you showed up, if anyone can help this guy sort the GT it's you.

Another 750GT showed up on ebay over here right after the one I missed-it's at £8200 already!
I still haven't made my mind up on the early 860GT I found-but will probably pass-it's cheap enough but god they are ugly bikes.

John
 
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