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Discussion Starter #1
I dont have the best place in the world for winter storage. It's inside but not climate controlled...thus letting all the moisture in the air get to it. I usually do an oil change, fog the engine, pull the battery, and then spray a light coat of Fluid-Film on it to prevent exterior corrosion. However, I have run into a major problem...moisture in the crankcase. With my busy schedule, sometimes I don't get to ride as much as I'd like and when I finally do ride....I find a large amount of moisture in the crankcase. Often times the oil level sight glass has that white color. It takes a solid 30-45 minute ride to burn it all out of there. I know I need to store it in a better place but that just isn't in the cards right now.

So my question is how do I fight this moisture? I think Suzuki recommends that you fill the v-strom crank cases to the brim with oil. What about a 900SS? Any other ideas?

Thanks
 

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Old Wizard
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However, I have run into a major problem...moisture in the crankcase. With my busy schedule, sometimes I don't get to ride as much as I'd like and when I finally do ride....I find a large amount of moisture in the crankcase.

So my question is how do I fight this moisture?
The ONLY solution is not start the engine in cold weather. Water is the principle product of combustion that condenses on cold oil and engine parts until the coolant temperature reaches 150°F or so.
 

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+1. Not that Shazaam needs my endorsement, but starting a motorcycle in the winter to "warm it up" is about the worst thing you can do.
I'd rather park the bike with old oil that's been properly used and has no moisture in it than new oil full of moisture.

Ultimately I don't think any of this really matters much.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I should have been more specific. I DO NOT run my bike during the winter. Once it's winterized...that's it. Its dormant until spring. I am just concerned about the humidity and temp variations during the time that it is sitting in storage. While running an engine makes it worse...condensation will build up on engine internals even when the engine isn't run. I know I'm being nit-picky but I really do hate corrosion and this is exactly how it happens. I may try filling the cases to the brim with oil. If it leaks...it leaks. And I'll drain it in the spring.
 

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Pro Grip makes exhaust cap off plugs to fit both 2 & 4 stroke round exhaust tips Venom.

They come in two sizes,large (part number 2560) and small (part number 2550). The large 2560 fits all round exhaust tips from roughly about 1 1/4" up to 2 7/16". That's roughly about 32mm up to 63mm for all you metric types out there.

I use the size large 2560 exhaust caps on all my bikes during winter storage,they do an excellent job of keeping moisture out. You can get these exhaust cap off plugs fairly cheap on Ebay.
 

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Sorry to high the POs post but I am about to put away my own bike for winter and I am worried that the hideous California fuel will clog up the carb jets - is it best to drain the fuel or top up the tank but add a stabilizer?
 

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Old Wizard
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I should have been more specific. I DO NOT run my bike during the winter. Once it's winterized...that's it. Its dormant until spring. I am just concerned about the humidity and temp variations during the time that it is sitting in storage. While running an engine makes it worse...condensation will build up on engine internals even when the engine isn't run.
Have you considered using an airtight storage bag? They're for use with a desiccant to keep the humidity levels low.

https://www.calcarcover.com/product/1384/274/AntiRust_Motorcycle_Storage_Bag

https://www.autopyjama.com/permabag-uk/motorbike/

Amazon.com: dri-z-air dehumidifier
 

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It's a good idea to get your tires off the ground too.
 

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I also store mine in an unheated garage, usually for 3 to 4 months. I don't worry too much about the condensation. Acids in the used oil are more corrosive (thus someone's recommendation of used oil for the winter is not a good one). The best recommendation is to take out the used oil and put in fresh oil as it goes into storage (which I do), and then in the spring drain that oil with the condensation and put in fresh oil again (which I usually don't bother with -- I just make sure my first ride of the season is long enough to boil off the moisture). Don't start it in the winter unless you're going to run for at least an hour, getting it up to full temperature.

If you have a plastic gas tank, drain the system completely, and run it until it has no gas in the system at all -- it runs out. Leave the cap open, and let the plastic dry out. If you have a metal tank, fill it to the top, add fuel stabilizer, and run it for a few minutes to get the stabilizer throughout the fuel system.

You can either pull the battery out, or leave it in with a battery tender on it (I do the latter).

I think it is a good idea to physically move the bike now and then. About once a week, I put it in 6th, and push the bike around a bit (in gear, *without* starting the bike), and leave it in a slightly different place. This helps prevent flatspotting the tires, keeps the cambelts from taking as much of a set, rolls the bearings and crank and such around to avoid taking sets there, moves the pistons to a different spot, etc. If I'm feeling lazy, I might cheat by just moving the bike, out of gear, to a new position for the tires, and use the starter motor to turn over the engine a few times without actually starting the bike.

I have never fogged my engine, although it's probably a good idea.
You'll have to ask someone else about protecting the appearance and cosmetics -- I'm *way* past caring about that.

PhilB
 
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Looking at Phils miles, he's got to be doing something right.
 

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Since 1998 I have stored my Ducatis in spaces similar to the OP's. I fill the gas tank and add fuel stabilizer then put it on a battery tender. Sometimes I do an oil change before storage. Not always. Haven't had a problem yet.
 

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Yes, that's about how I felt about it until this year. I didn't do much more than the minimum and it was always fine. The last two years I haven't put the miles on due to being extremely busy, and the bikes have sat there on their side stands. When I took them for a ride after Stabil to circulate it around, several of them had a flopping feeling in the front end which I am attributing to having weight on them on side stands too long. Really not much else it could be, different bikes, different tires, only common denominator was all parked on side stands, maybe putting side load on the tires. They felt differently going left than going right. So, they went on the stands front and rear, and I'm hoping they straighten themselves out after some miles.
 

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If one of my bikes goes down there you can bet your sweet bippy I'll be with it. I wish I could afford to insure them, but where I live you not only pay the insurance but a " catastrophic claims " fee which is more than the insurance, per vehicle, not rider.
 

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If one of my bikes goes down there you can bet your sweet bippy I'll be with it. I wish I could afford to insure them, but where I live you not only pay the insurance but a " catastrophic claims " fee which is more than the insurance, per vehicle, not rider.
In Australia we have compulsory third party insurance that is probably similar and it can be the largest component of bike ownership. It covers the people you might run into and doesn't cover any property or you for that matter. In the US (Cali) I can get that for very little but you can pick your level of insurance from basically no where near enough to cover anything. In Australia the gov make sure no one has to sue to get paid out for someone else injuring you.

Insurance generally in Aus is expensive but the system here is far less litigious than the US. But you get to ride all year round here as a bonus unless you live at high altitude or Tasmania.
 
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