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Anyone know if the tire companies spec "Operating Temperatures" for tires?

I have'nt used my Pirelli Corsa's yet,but I will be cautious when they are cold after what I have read here.

I was just wondering, as I have one of those laser temperature guages that SnapOn makes,would that work to check the tire is warm?

Not really since a probe would have to be somewhat inside the rubber...

I`ve been riding in cold temps and the well worn out front supercorsa was still good enough...I dont understand how you guys loose traction that easily...or are you racing on the streets?

BTW,the pilot powers sucks on a 1098...even after being well heated.

I`ll never put other std powers on that thing ever again...they dont stick enough period! (perso opinion,of course)
 

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You don't like the Pilots either? Wow, I thought I was the only one. I have been thinking about switching to the Pirelli's, let us know what you think once you get them on. Thanks.
 

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Not really since a probe would have to be somewhat inside the rubber...

...or are you racing on the streets?
You can use a contact (probe-type) or non-contact (infra red type) temp gun if you want to check tire temps. I have used both aqt the race track and unless you want to be super anal, even the cheapie pocket IR ones are accurate enough. I have owned contact (RebCo) and high end IR (Raytek) and have cross tested all of them. Currently I own 2 Rayteks that I only use for general temps, and an Exergen DX501 (non-contact) I use at the track. http://www.exergen.com/industrl/dxseries/broch.htm

I can't speak for the other guy but not racing on the street, not even "spirited" most of the time. The colder weather around here seems to hold moisture and coldness in the pavement. Any corner you go around could be cold and wet and never sees sunlight. Some even have the added bonus of a constant stream of green algae water.

After using the pilot races I thought the powers felt kind of wiggly.
I haven't tried the Races but I too thought the Powers felt wiggly. They seemed to get better as the tread wore down a bit.
 

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2 years ago I was riding my 750 (daily driver) on a cold October morning. A friend and I decided to go to a breakfast get together back some really nice country roads. My other bikes were in various states of out of commission, so the 750 was it. Anyhow fueled up on some tasty vittles, I got rambunctious hitting the curvies - on the third curve I downshifted going into it and the torque from the downshift actually caused my axle to walk slightly (my adjuster was damaged only weeks prior by a dipshit, another story). The axle walk was just enough to bind caliper and rotor effectively locking up the back wheel. The curve ironically had an extended driveway that was a straight shot out of it, so instead of losing it on the turn, I went for the straight shot. AND would have made it with a lay down except for one thing - cold tires. I couldn't get enough grip to turn its skiddingness into the driveway. THIS caused me to head striaght for a wall that separated the turn and driveway, and provoked me to lay her down, roll out of it and hope my fairing had enough co-efficient of friction to halt the bike prior to the wall (it did). Got pissed, kicked the wheel back straight, wedged the adjuster and rode the thing 30 miles home.

Moral of the story: You'll never know what will happen with cold tires. And even if you've ridden a few miles they may still be "cold" depending on compounds. Cold tires, the hidden enemy.

This was on Metzlers (Sportecs M-1)which I will never own again.
 

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I`ve been riding in cold temps and the well worn out front supercorsa was still good enough...I dont understand how you guys loose traction that easily...or are you racing on the streets?
I don't think it's a simple temperature thing. A case in point would be my ride to work this morning, it was about 20°F, up from a low of 17°F. There's lots of sand and salt on the asphalt due to the ice and snow lately, which can make things a bit tricky, but it's generally not too bad. The dry pavement I encountered this morning wasn't bad, quite grippy, although I wouldn't be trying anything close to an aggressive lean on it due to the sand - but overall not bad for the winter. However, at a left turn light, using the same conservative cornering speed and a little less angle by hanging off a bit I ended up lightly drifting across this patch of pavement. It didn't appear to be very sandy there, so I can only guess it was the slight dampness of the pavement combined with the residual sand. It felt like sand to me, the way I lost the feedback from the tires and not the typical stuttered slipping you get from just a wet tire. So I can completely understand how an eager throttle could get you into trouble and that's the reason I ride quite conservatively in the winter and into the summer. The sand doesn't get washed completely off the pavement until about mid-summer, so you have to tone it down even on 60°F pavement in the spring when it's wet.
 

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I don't think it's a simple temperature thing. A case in point would be my ride to work this morning, it was about 20°F, up from a low of 17°F.
I agree. Any good disaster is usually a series of small mistakes. Riders with even modest experience adjust naturally to less traction in cold, wet and ditry road conditions. Since you are at a loss to come up with an obvious cause, it's likely that a brief lack of concentration at the exact moment of limited traction caused the problem. Why limited traction, perhaps the wrong lane position, a little antifreee, a wet leaf, who knows.

Tim
 

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I'm surprised nobody mentioned the center lines... I'm sure cold tires didn't help the situation but when it's cold outside one of the biggest problems comes from the yellow center lines, or the white lines and arrows on the road. They frost over quick and since they absorb less heat from the Sun will still be frozen long after the rest of the road is "Frost Free" avoid them in the mornings or all the time in the winter. If you were taking off and turning onto the main road you could have crossed over one and been on your side before you knew what happened.
 
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