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If you haven't given him some money, he can back out without consequence. I would suggest you give him some funds before closing and paper it over.

bob
Yeah, a couple of weeks is a potential deal killer (unless you are lucky). I would do whatever was necessary to get there and get it done. It's spring time and shoppers are out there. Selling things fast is where it's at. When things sit people wonder if they are priced too high which hurts the seller. If it comes off the market and then returns again a few weeks later people wonder why the first buyer backed out which also hurts the seller. Fingers crossed for you!
 

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Discussion Starter #42
If you haven't given him some money, he can back out without consequence. I would suggest you give him some funds before closing and paper it over.
bob
Good advice. I sent 10% with PayPal protection.

Another topic, how do y'all like to attach tie down straps? I've actually never trailered a bike before, let alone one that demands some careful attention to the finish.
 

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Good advice. I sent 10% with PayPal protection.

Another topic, how do y'all like to attach tie down straps? I've actually never trailered a bike before, let alone one that demands some careful attention to the finish.
I like the ideal of the Pit Bull trailer restraint , but I like the multiple uses of a Baxley wheel chock more at this time.

My set up is a Baxley Wheel chock and a ratchet strap on each side attached to the frame above foot pegs and pulling forward/downward.
 

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570 miles...? Get on a plane/train/bus with leathers & helmet & ride it home!! (courier the spares & accessories :)
Agree.

Have a friend drive down with you and caravan back. The weather is great for a short adventure. It's only 1 or 2 gas stops. Piece of cake.

You'll be somewhat intimate with her by the time you get home😎

Bob
 

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Spent the weekend talking with the owner. He seems like a great guy!
Long story short, if you ever are in Oregon hit me up. I owe you a beer for spotting it. Going to take a couple of weeks to get it picked up. I might not sleep until then. I'm still a little anxious the deal will fall through for some reason. I have no reason to believe it will though. Owner seems trustworthy. I'll feel better when the ad comes down or gets marked "sold".
I hope you're able to get this bike... I wish I lived closer and I could help you out.

If I'm ever back in Oregon, I'll look you up for that beer and a good conversation about Supersports... My dad is from Eugene and I grew up in Spokane (moved away 26 years ago). Five years ago I lived in Tacoma for a year... If you've not been on it, NF25 between Randle and Carson, WA is 80 miles of motorcycling bliss (the link shows the run to Windy Ridge, and then you must make the second run to Cougar, WA for gas)! Well, the top 20 miles can be rough, but the rest of the road is worth it. Some of the best I've been on, and that includes three years in Italy.

I think you'll love it. I had very little mechanical skill when I bought mine (the 900SL I always took to the dealer). Now, I've not had it in a shop in nearly six years, and I've learned to do most of the work myself.

For what it's worth, I've ridden several Ducati SBKs, yet I still love it when I get back on my 900SS... Sure, it doesn't spin up as quickly as a modern bike, and redlines a lot sooner, but it more than makes up for it with Character, not to mention the ease (and pride) of working on it yourself. The SS is the natural evolution of the '80s Ducati TT1 and TT2 air-cooled race bikes. I can sit and stare at it for hours, with the fairings on or off. I love the way everything in the SS fits together "just right" without any extra crap. It's a minimalist machine, for sure, but it's one that generates lots of passion. At least it does in me and the rest of the guys & gals on this forum!
 

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Now, I've not had it in a shop in nearly six years, and I've learned to do most of the work myself.
For what it's worth, I've ridden several Ducati SBKs, yet I still love it when I get back on my 900SS... Sure, it doesn't spin up as quickly as a modern bike, and redlines a lot sooner, but it more than makes up for it with Character, not to mention the ease (and pride) of working on it yourself. The SS is the natural evolution of the '80s Ducati TT1 and TT2 air-cooled race bikes. I can sit and stare at it for hours, with the fairings on or off. I love the way everything in the SS fits together "just right" without any extra crap. It's a minimalist machine, for sure, but it's one that generates lots of passion. At least it does in me and the rest of the guys & gals on this forum!
Gotta agree with pretty much all of that!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Aaaaaaaaaand she's in my garage!

The rear brake is acting up, but otherwise she seems mechanically perfect.
What is the opinion of open belt covers? I think they look fantastic, and I love the idea of being able to inspect at least one belt whenever I want, but does road debris get in there?
 

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Congrats, give us a photo or two!

Re the belt covers, Speedy Moto and Strada Fab makes semi open sets, not to my taste but each to their own.
 

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Aaaaaaaaaand she's in my garage!
Outstanding! I'm happy for you. Did you end up riding it or transporting it?

The rear brake is acting up, but otherwise she seems mechanically perfect.
If it works but it squeaks, then there's nothing wrong... It's the cast iron disk and another of those SS things you learn to live with!

What is the opinion of open belt covers? I think they look fantastic, and I love the idea of being able to inspect at least one belt whenever I want, but does road debris get in there?
I've been running open covers for about two years... The only issue is I've gotten a bit of rust on the tensioning rollers. Learn from me and make sure it's dry when you put her away. Otherwise, I agree with you. I like being able to check it before each ride.

Again, I'm happy for you. Welcome to the club!
 

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Discussion Starter #57
I decided to trailer. It came with boxes of spare/original parts. By the way, I have never noticed how bumpy/twisty/steep (often all at once!) the 200 miles from Yreka, CA to Roseburg, OR are. Kind of a worst case scenario for trailering a bike, but the canyon dancer bar harness worked like a charm.

By "acting up" I mean I think the rear brake master cylinder might be shot, or there is a ton of air in the line. Seller knocked a bit off the price for me. The pedal moves with almost zero resistance and the pads don't even budge. Fortunately, I'm good at replacing bolt on parts. Unfortunately I am bad at diagnosing what is actually wrong.

I'll try to get some good pics today. It's bright and sunny, so maybe when the light starts to fade a bit tonight.
 

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Re: open belt covers

If it's stored inside, no worries. The only negative I've heard of is winter issues. Ice in the belt cavity can cause the bet to have issues. One owner had them come off/break ( I remember the owners story but don't remember which happened).

I suppose clutch covers could also suffer some impact.

Bob
 

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You want rear brakes on an SS!

They were a factory option that didn't work <G>.

The stock brakes are designed to remind you that front brakes stop a moving motorcycle.

Bob
 
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