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NEVER wash a Ducati. Feels like almost every "My XXX won't start..." thread involves someone washing and or otherwise getting their Duc wet.
 

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NEVER wash a Ducati. Feels like almost every "My XXX won't start..." thread involves someone washing and or otherwise getting their Duc wet.

Never had a single issuse with washing my bike, Car pressure washer or not. But when Im washing, I know where to stay away from and I also use a air compressor and blow my bike completely dry every time. Knock on wood. Has worked for me so far. I hate a dirty bike, so I wash a lot!!
 

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I've been giving mine sponge baths... I will continue to do so. Not confident that I know where NOT to spray with a hose.
 

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I ride my 748 in the rain regularly, never had a single problem! :eek: I also wash it every few months, even degreased it once with the fairings off (left it to dry for a day though), again never had a problem. Never used a pressure washer though, that's asking for trouble.
 

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NEVER wash a Ducati. Feels like almost every "My XXX won't start..." thread involves someone washing and or otherwise getting their Duc wet.
Go to pretty much any bike fourm and you will read similar threads. It's definetly NOT just a Ducati thing. ;)
 

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An evening with a tube of dielectric grease and the bodywork off (aaaaawww yeaaaahhh) will prevent 99% of those problems.

Best example - my neutral light was 50/50 when I first got the bike. All I did was scuff the connectors with sandpaper, put them back together with grease, and now it's been 100% reliable for 6 years. Do that over the whole bike and you won't have to worry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
An evening with a tube of dielectric grease and the bodywork off (aaaaawww yeaaaahhh) will prevent 99% of those problems...
Interesting... will this work with the relay connectors as well?
 

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Interesting... will this work with the relay connectors as well?
Absolutely. You should grease every connection you can get your mitts on. Cheap insurance. If you see any evidence of corrosion, scuff the posts with sandpaper for better contact before you grease.

I worked on British bikes for a while. You guys don't know REAL electrical nightmares till you've tried to fix an electric fault on a brit bike from the 50s or 60s.
 

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I haven't "washed" any of my bikes (including track) since 2004. If and when they see rain I fire up the air compressor and blast it off from everywhere. If it's really bad I'll pull the fairings and clean the inside with kerosine. The outside ONLY gets hit with quick detailer. I have a 2000 GSXR-750 that those who don't know motorcycle bodystyles think is the newest model year. If you don't neglect the upkeep I don't see why a motorcycle would ever need a "car wash."
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I haven't "washed" any of my bikes (including track) since 2004. If and when they see rain I fire up the air compressor and blast it off from everywhere. If it's really bad I'll pull the fairings and clean the inside with kerosine. The outside ONLY gets hit with quick detailer. I have a 2000 GSXR-750 that those who don't know motorcycle bodystyles think is the newest model year. If you don't neglect the upkeep I don't see why a motorcycle would ever need a "car wash."
Agree, however I recognize that this may not work for everyone, especially those who commute on their bikes. Mine goes outside for rides after work and on weekends, and ONLY when the weather is absolutely pristine.
 

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subscribed..

my bike is in need of a wash and i usually wash the bike every 2 months or so during the season and at the end of it i'll put wax on it and put it on stands for the winter.. i recently put an open clutch kit on it and i'm a little worried to put any water near that thing..

i don't get what anyone is doing for their bike to fail at starting after washing it.. these are motor vehicles made to endure [most of] the elements. are you riding into the sea?
 

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my bike is in need of a wash and i usually wash the bike every 2 months or so during the season and at the end of it i'll put wax on it and put it on stands for the winter.. i recently put an open clutch kit on it and i'm a little worried to put any water near that thing..

i don't get what anyone is doing for their bike to fail at starting after washing it.. these are motor vehicles made to endure [most of] the elements. are you riding into the sea?
After washing with the open clutch take the bike around to block a few times so the plates can dry, otherwise they're rust together and then you'll have some problems.


Sent from my iPhone using MO Free
 

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Speaking of washing, white wheels are a Catch-22. Of all finishes and colors, they look the best when they are perfectly clean. the only trick is that it is impossible to get them perfectly clean without removing the rotors, and then it is only until the first stop.
 

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I never hose the bike off. Always hand wash using only damp rag that is rinsed often in a bucket. No reason to send water dripping all over the internals. when I clean the motor & frame I remove the fairings and wipe down with a rag and solvent. I am sure the bikes are designed to withstand some water exposure but taking some extra time not to hose things off and do it by hand will never hurt it. Can't same the same for a hose, even one in mist mode with no added stream force.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I never hose the bike off. Always hand wash using only damp rag that is rinsed often in a bucket. No reason to send water dripping all over the internals. when I clean the motor & frame I remove the fairings and wipe down with a rag and solvent. I am sure the bikes are designed to withstand some water exposure but taking some extra time not to hose things off and do it by hand will never hurt it. Can't same the same for a hose, even one in mist mode with no added stream force.
That is exactly what I do as well... Maybe it's a CT thing. ;)
 

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I had a Monster that I pressure washed maybe once a month for 2.5 years (only during riding season of course) and never had a single problem. I have pressure washed my superbikes also. Obviously you want to take care at what you aim the pressure washer at, but no reason to fear a good wash in my personal opinion.
 

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Never washed my 999 yet. I'd rather take it apart and give it a damp cloth wipe down or use some Honda spray cleaner....which works super on just about everything. The Marchesini kompe forged aluminum wheels are a PITA. But a small stiff paint brush, a few Q-tips, cut up old T-shirts and elbow grease gets the job done, plus it's mental break from all the BS....
 

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Never use dielectric grease - Caig labs DN-5 or similar conductivity enhancer is much better (DeoxIT® D-Series). Several service bulletins from elite auto mfgs. warn against dielectric grease, and Shazaam has a nice post on Ducati.ms detailing the problem. He likes Stabilant 22, but that's too rich for my blood.

Ron
 

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I've ridden all my bikes in the rain (a lot) Washed them with hose and pressure washer. Never had a problem. Water is your friend:)
 
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