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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys..

i have always done my allignment by counting the number of turns from the chain tensioning nuts. which turned out to be quite accurate (at least on my st4) but cumbersom.
wat he moment i have the rear wheel trubbles and i thought to get this topic up.. as there must be an easier way..

I did read about a pocket laser allignment tool from DD, but i'm not sure what Dd is, which website. and even then it looks like it's from the US.
so there must be a way to get something here or another way if doing this properly.

I also tried once something i read about tying a cord arong front and rear wheel and measuring the differences..

but stand was in the way of this thread so.. that didn't work out either.

anyway. i'm very interested in how you guys do this.

Kind regards

Matthieu
 

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I measure the distance between the swing arm pivot center and the axle center with a homemade set of calipers. You could also just use the alignment marks on the swing arm. They are not the most precise, but might be better than counting alignment bolt turns which would only be a valid way of doing it if you were in perfect aligned to start with...

My homemade tool


 

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I measure the distance between the swing arm pivot center and the axle center with a homemade set of calipers. You could also just use the alignment marks on the swing arm. They are not the most precise, but might be better than counting alignment bolt turns which would only be a valid way of doing it if you were in perfect aligned to start with...

Are those Home Depot plumb bobs for the indicators?
 

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I just use a cheap ($10) pair of calipers. I stick one end in the axle-hole on the inner edge and the other to the swingarm end cap. Then use the screws to fine tune.
 

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Gotta love threaded rod.
Yeah, it may be a little overbuilt! My idea when doing it was to have no flexing / bending that may throw off the measurement. On the bright side, it doubles as a stealthy home defense tool!
 
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I just use a cheap ($10) pair of calipers. I stick one end in the axle-hole on the inner edge and the other to the swingarm end cap. Then use the screws to fine tune.
Not a bad idea, but then that's assuming the swing arm sides are the same length to the end in relation to the axle pivot. I know I'm over thinking this to a ridiculous degree, but my desire was to be sure the tire was aligned with the swing arm and therefore the rest of the bike. I even consider the chain /sprocket alignment to be secondary to tire alignment, to be honest. There is some room for slop in the chain and it is a wear item, but proper tire alignment is more important to chassis alignment and that is what I was after.

I'll bet the swing arm marks are more than good enough in the end. I have to say, they are definitely in the ballpark after using my homemade tool. On the road adjustment, I'd be happy with those marks. I am using aftermarket aluminum side plates and have the S model aluminum swing arm though. Don't know what the steel parts look like in that regard.

Edit... That's not to say my chain alignment is off as a result of tire / chassis alignment. It is aligned very well, in fact. I was just pointing out that perfect chain alignment was not what I was after.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey guys, thanks for all the replies!!

@ ss904: I love your tool!! i'll see if i can go and build one of those too. has got to be very accurate.

about using the amount of turns.. I actually measured it the first time and it was rather accurate. I started indeed from the idea that the holes thrue wich it slides are machine made and should be perfectly located.. if not.. well then what will be? one has to go from something neventually, but i really like your methode!! I anyway more accurate then using the chain to allign.. also those tools will mostlikely be very easy but i'll go pass from that.

on the other hand.. [email protected] idea is alos rather good.. again going from the idea that it is machine made.. so should be exual.. in any case much easier then my method.
to make sure that it is equal one can just measure it once the hard way and if it is equal one can from then on go from that.

so i'll be desideing what to do.. (dont have a cheap caliper.. ony two good once, but easy enough to buy)
 

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Just Visiting Your Planet
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I do the same thing as Dan, but here is my homemade tool:





It's a wire coat hanger with a zip-tie on it that I can slide. Dan's is more elegant, but mine is just as accurate. :D
 

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I do the same thing as Dan, but here is my homemade tool:

It's a wire coat hanger with a zip-tie on it that I can slide. Dan's is more elegant, but mine is just as accurate. :D
Yeah, but can you defend against the zombie apocalypse, or any other random home invaders, with yours?!?!?
 
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I align and adjust the chain, then use the factory marks. I live on a dirt road. If I can gas it and the rear end walks one way or the other, I readjust until it goes straight. When I check alignment after that it looks pretty close.
 

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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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I'll second that! - After the wheel is aligned and the bolts are tight, the wheel will probably be slightly out of line, but this can happen with all methods.



David


Not if you use this little trick. Run your wrench up between the chain and sprocket. It takes all the slack out of the chain and pulls the axel up tight against the adjusters while you tighten the axel nut.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Mr Leakered
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Or, shove a pry bar under the rear tire while tightening the axle. Does the same thing. I found the snugging the right side first seems to be more problematic than the left. The pry bar solved it all for me.

Have a good one.
 

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Alignment Tool

Some great ideas here. Many are based on having the rear axle parallel to the swing arm pivot. And that assumes the swing arm pivot is perpendicular to the line of travel to which we want our wheels aligned.

So I accept all those assumptions and believe the best alignment to be had uses one of those methods. When I first saw SS904's method, I wanted to make one of those things. But I didn't have any plumb bobs hanging around nor was I imaginative to think I could get any at Lowes.

I did have some straight rods and some rubber stoppers of various sizes with holes predrilled in the centers. I found stoppers that fit the axle and swing arm pivots and ran the rods thru the stoppers. Then put some other stoppers on another rod and snugged up those stoppers to measure the distance between the rods on one side. Then moved the measuring rod to the other side. A nice thing about this method is that the measuring rod can stay in place while I adjust until it falls perfectly in place on each side.



This picture shows the rods on my R6 but it works the same on the ST2. The measuring rod is not in correct position in this picture, but you get the idea.

r-

Tom C.
 
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