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I was inspired by the look of some SS owners’ shiny pipes....
Like this? Enjoy the shine while the shine is shining 'cos it won't shine for long. You have reminded me that mine are due to be polished again; takes five minutes on a polishing wheel.

Cheers.
 

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Nice! Looks like a musical instrument. I suppose the trick is not to let them get too bad. Put in the work now and again, or do what you’ve done and remove them completely for the polishing wheel treatment.
 

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Tarting up the old girl

Making progress tarting up the old girl.
 

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The stock headers have some sort of coating on them. I took mine to a metal polisher and they came back with a mirror finish. I think I paid about $150 in the L.A. area for the work. Word of caution, they don't stay mirror polished and road grime can leave spots to deal with. If I had it to do over again, I might have left them stock.
 

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Re Tarting up the old girl.

How did you polish the header pipe?
I used an orbital sander with 120 grit to get rid of the crap and the pit marks, then 240g, 400g, 600g and finally buffing wheel and Autosol (or any similar metal polish). The polish just shines up your sanding work. The hard work is the sanding.

You could use a proper pipe sander but I don’t have access to one of those and they are pretty pricey (min USD150 or so). A bit much for a single job.
 

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The stock headers have some sort of coating on them. I took mine to a metal polisher and they came back with a mirror finish. I think I paid about $150 in the L.A. area for the work. Word of caution, they don't stay mirror polished and road grime can leave spots to deal with. If I had it to do over again, I might have left them stock.
Now you tell me - LOL! Only kidding. I’ll just have to face up to a new life of polishing.
 

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first ride of the season...

'Picked up and rode the SS home from the shop this afternoon. 'Had them install a quickshifter, gear indicator, toe guard; and service the rear shock.



My apologies if some think it was sacrilegious to drill the beautiful swingarm. The toe guard is bigger than I expected but it's primarily a bike for the track and it just needs to work once in my book.



I had not ridden a bike with a quickshifter before today, pretty slick, can't wait to try it out at the track later this month!
 

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What is the real point of the guard on the swingarm. Not nice to look at, in my view.
Better than looking at one´s leftover finger or toe stumps should one unluckily get caught in between the chain & sprocket in a tumble...
 

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In many racing series a chain guard is mandatory. Bear in mind that it’s not only on the track that people fall off. I have one on my Panigale (admittedly mostly a track bike) but I want to put one on my road going carby SS.
 

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Running a bike on the Dyno yesterday I kept wearing the bottom of my heal on the top of the chain as there was no chain guard in this area. Not that the owner will be riding the bike like I was it is still odd to feel the rumble of a chain under foot. ...lol

Safety is never a bad thing in my book ........that said you have destroyed the once beautiful swingarm and must send it to me. I will send you a ugly steel version you can make as ugly as you like... no? I don't blame you one bit.
 

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After 7 months of waiting and a fair amount of drama, these fellas showed up from the man in brown today.

Saved me 1.2 pounds that I don't need to lose off my waist by the riding season. That's like 4 cheeseburgers, or 12 hours on the treadmill. More importantly, gives my 36" inseam a little more comfort.
 

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What is the real point of the guard on the swingarm. Not nice to look at, in my view.
Better than looking at one´s leftover finger or toe stumps should one unluckily get caught in between the chain & sprocket in a tumble...
If that risk really bothers you and is of such a concern that you bolt that thing on your swingarm, riding a 15 year old bike with no abs, traction control, riding modes etc. should probably be of a much higher concern and constitute a much higher risk of accidents.

Combining all the many unsafety factors riding these old bikes, the lack of any modern safety features etc., I would choose aesthetics in some areas before adding this to my bike.

Unless, of course, you’re racing in an environment that requires one.
 

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....riding a 15 year old bike with no abs, traction control, riding modes etc. should probably be of a much higher concern and constitute a much higher risk of accidents.
Following that logic, the probability of crashing is higher so the risk of trapping ones fingers / toes increases...
 

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I installed my home made rearset brackets. These are lower and a little farther forward compared to the Woodcraft units that I had. I also swapped out a lot of corroded fasteners just to clean the bike up a bit.
I am still working on the rearbrake. I will be using a crankcase bracket from a 996 to mount the rear brake master cylinder, that keeps the rearset bracket simple
 

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