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Getting rid of discoloured and dirty paint that can’t be cleaned properly on the front part of the horizontal cylinder. Here the paint has been stripped on horizontal cylinder head down to and including the first row of cooling fins. Light buffing and polishing brings out a nice alu finish that complement the painted part nicely. Not completely done yet, but it gives a nice surface that can easily be cleaned and look like “new” with some light buffing. Scratches are also easily polished away.
 

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Installed a Pro Oiler on the new to me SS

Here is the Junction box, pump and Oil tank. There is a GPS sensor in there too, but it is tucked up under the plastic so you can't see it.



Here is the controller mounted on the triple clamp.



And the oil nozzle at the rear sprocket.



I have had these on my last three chain drive bikes and will never own a chain drive bike again without one.
 

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All to their own, but unless you ride in all weather/all year/winter/long distance tourer/don’t do regular maintenance, I would never bother with an automatic oiler system. The complexity and instalment of such a system to do a job a rag and a can of chain oil can do (better).

As said, unless you ride in some extreme conditions or don’t bother with regular maintenance, this is total over-complicating a simple job. The amount of things you need to install, a control device on the steering stem, the applicator on the swingarm (drilling into the swingarm), boxes and oil reservoirs under the seat and in the side fairings, all wired together with wiring and tubes.....come on! This is a SS not a ST :)
 

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All to their own, but unless you ride in all weather/all year/winter/long distance tourer/don’t do regular maintenance, I would never bother with an automatic oiler system. The complexity and instalment of such a system to do a job a rag and a can of chain oil can do (better).

As said, unless you ride in some extreme conditions or don’t bother with regular maintenance, this is total over-complicating a simple job. The amount of things you need to install, a control device on the steering stem, the applicator on the swingarm (drilling into the swingarm), boxes and oil reservoirs under the seat and in the side fairings, all wired together with wiring and tubes.....come on! This is a SS not a ST :)
I will disagree with your assessment that a rag and a can of chain lube is better.

Nothing works better than this automatic system, and it extends chain life.
First bike I put one on (Suzuki RF 900) didn't have a center stand, so apply chain lube was a pain. I never had to adjust the chain between putting new rear tires on.

Funny you mentioned sts, cause I also put one of these on the ST4s I had. Don't know how old the chain and sprockets were when I got the bike. But I didn't replace then until after I put 18,000 miles on the bike. Guy who owns the shop that replaced it for me sais he had never seen a chain go that long.

So as usual, everyone has their own opinions.
I will keep my chain oiler, cause it makes the chain last longer and keeps it much cleaner. Side benefit is clean up of the rear rim is easier. This oil comes off the wheel much easier than any canned chain lube I have ever used.

As to the smoke screen comment, NO. It doesn't use that much oil.
 

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Carbon fibre; have been thinking about it for awhile, finally did it 'cos they became available locally!
FWIW they are both genuine Ducati Performance parts (part numbers imprinted underneath).

The rub mark on rear tyre is from the original hugger; the plastic split near a mount point.
 

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Finally got the time to put the bike back together.
Did the full tune up, added the chain oiler, changed gearing.

Since I had the exhaust off to remove the rear wheel, thought I would give it a start before putting them back on.

http://karlsgarage.com/pictures/duckstart1.MOV

Then I put the exhaust back on and started it up again.

http://karlsgarage.com/pictures/duckstart2.MOV

Unfortunately the 4 inches of snow right outside my garage door means no test ride yet to see how much better she runs with the valves in spec.

Maybe I'll get a warm day next week.
 

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Carbon fibre; have been thinking about it for awhile, finally did it 'cos they became available locally!
FWIW they are both genuine Ducati Performance parts (part numbers imprinted underneath).

The rub mark on rear tyre is from the original hugger; the plastic split near a mount point.
Nothing better than can original CF part! Mine were very faded and spotty. After having them finely sanded and clear coated they improved dramatically - but certainly not up to the original. Any ideas how to keep them from fading again??
 

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It’s very easy to keep them from fading again. Park the bike in your living room, but don’t put it by any window with direct sun.
 

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Don't laugh, mine spent the first winter in the family room. Mrs. said that wouldn't last so I sold it. Turns out the 2nd owner moved out to Arizona and I'm betting that had something to do with it fading so badly. I finally fixed up the garages to be able to store it, found it again and bought it back. Now on the slow road to recovery.
I'll be the sun is to blame.
Redoing them cost me about $100US each but I couldn't find originals.
 

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Getting rid of discoloured and dirty paint that can’t be cleaned properly on the front part of the horizontal cylinder. Here the paint has been stripped on horizontal cylinder head down to and including the first row of cooling fins. Light buffing and polishing brings out a nice alu finish that complement the painted part nicely. Not completely done yet, but it gives a nice surface that can easily be cleaned and look like “new” with some light buffing. Scratches are also easily polished away.
That looks neat. How did you do it? I’d like to do that to mine.
 

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I did some “basics” to mine. Pretty clutch and some carbon belt covers from RSR Moto. (replaced the belts in the process).
 

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Getting rid of discoloured and dirty paint that can’t be cleaned properly on the front part of the horizontal cylinder. Here the paint has been stripped on horizontal cylinder head down to and including the first row of cooling fins. Light buffing and polishing brings out a nice alu finish that complement the painted part nicely. Not completely done yet, but it gives a nice surface that can easily be cleaned and look like “new” with some light buffing. Scratches are also easily polished away.
That looks neat. How did you do it? I’d like to do that to mine.
Paint degreaser and a small brush to apply only in the selected area. When all paint is removed I treat the alu surface with a microfibre cloth and some alu polish paste to get the desired finish. You can use some fine grit sandpaper also if some areas are a little rough in the surface. The painted engine looks smooth, but it covers a fairly rough alu surface. And a lot of elbow grease. Especially the cooling fins. I have done it with the engine in the frame, only the fairings removed, and of course the limited access makes it more difficult and time consuming compared to if the engine was out and you could work more effectively. But I have a 6 month winter and plenty of time and do a little at a time. It is quite meditative to me :)
 

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I removed all the casting flash from the head and cylinder fins , even behind the belt housing, with a combination of Dremel bits and drill bits. I used a drill bit on a variable speed drill to open narrow points between fins to a consistent gap. After painting the cylinders I may polish the edge of the fins. I haven’t decided yet. Will this result in a cooler running engine ? Maybe, but probably not. Casting flash closed off air flow behind the belt housing on mine though, and now air can flow through.
 

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Paint degreaser and a small brush to apply only in the selected area. When all paint is removed I treat the alu surface with a microfibre cloth and some alu polish paste to get the desired finish. You can use some fine grit sandpaper also if some areas are a little rough in the surface. The painted engine looks smooth, but it covers a fairly rough alu surface. And a lot of elbow grease. Especially the cooling fins. I have done it with the engine in the frame, only the fairings removed, and of course the limited access makes it more difficult and time consuming compared to if the engine was out and you could work more effectively. But I have a 6 month winter and plenty of time and do a little at a time. It is quite meditative to me :)
Well done! We have a few months over summer when we can’t ride much (except a couple of hours after sunrise - that’s if you don’t mind 40-45C (104-113F) before it starts to really warm up). The family usually escape the heat for a month during school holidays and go to visit family in cooler climes. During that time I keep my bikes indoors and our big lounge becomes a fantastic workshop :smile2: I’ll save that job until then.
 

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Carbon fibre; have been thinking about it for awhile, finally did it 'cos they became available locally!
FWIW they are both genuine Ducati Performance parts (part numbers imprinted underneath).

The rub mark on rear tyre is from the original hugger; the plastic split near a mount point.
Those looks really nice! They're not new? You just refinished them?
 

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Shiny pipes

I was inspired by the look of some SS owners’ shiny pipes so I decided to do something about the grubby ones on the 900 I recently bought. A lot of hard work but I achieved what I wanted.
 

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They had thick cracked and whitish faded clear coat.
Paint stripper, sanding for many hours, clear coat.
Not super glossy but ok.

Cheers.
 
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