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Day trip to Centralia PA yesterday with a buddy. Dodged expected rain all day (and managed to stay completely dry) and had a good time riding the excellent rural PA roads (only real downside is the crazy low speed limits).

Centralia is the town that was abandoned after a fire started in a coal mine 40 or so years ago (it'll be burning for hundreds more apparently). Pretty interesting place.

This is "the graffiti highway"... a stretch of 61 that was abandoned (routed around) after it was buckled by heat from the fire.






 

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Just did the headlight mod to keep my low beams on when I turn on my highs. Big difference at night on rural roads.


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2 great posts guys, Graffiti highway (cool pics Dave) and the light mod, sweet idea.
 

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Day trip to Centralia PA yesterday with a buddy. Dodged expected rain all day (and managed to stay completely dry) and had a good time riding the excellent rural PA roads (only real downside is the crazy low speed limits).



Centralia is the town that was abandoned after a fire started in a coal mine 40 or so years ago (it'll be burning for hundreds more apparently). Pretty interesting place.



This is "the graffiti highway"... a stretch of 61 that was abandoned (routed around) after it was buckled by heat from the fire.















This is awesome


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Great idea is there a write up on how to do this?


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I used this writeup for the general idea but put it together my own way.

I think there's some other threads on the forum about the same thing as well, but the basic idea is jumper the switched relay coil leads on the high and low beams together with a diode so whenever you run you highs the lows relay gets the same signal, but if you de-energize the highs the diode will keep the potential at the low coil lead from energizing the high beams relay.

It's stupid simple and isn't a permanent mod - you can pull it off in minutes if you decide you don't like it. But I frequently find myself riding with my finger on the passing light switch to get more light so I figured it was time to make it a thing!
 

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Well, I did say it was pretentious, as in unnecessary (for the most part). Those cush drive studs can't turn, and the nuts are tq'd correctly, so I'm not concerned about anything coming loose. The only real useful purpose for the wire I guess would be to keep from losing a nut in the unlikely event one of them came loose.
 

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Day trip to Centralia PA yesterday with a buddy. Dodged expected rain all day (and managed to stay completely dry) and had a good time riding the excellent rural PA roads (only real downside is the crazy low speed limits).

Centralia is the town that was abandoned after a fire started in a coal mine 40 or so years ago (it'll be burning for hundreds more apparently). Pretty interesting place.

This is "the graffiti highway"... a stretch of 61 that was abandoned (routed around) after it was buckled by heat from the fire.






Thanks, I'm putting this on my list next time I'm down in PA.
 

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Thanks, I'm putting this on my list next time I'm down in PA.
Here's a handy map for planning your ride... I'd suggest heading south into PA on 219 from Buffalo and then work your way East. 6 is OK (it's the main east/west on the North side of PA) but if you're adventurous then around Port Allegheny head south and work your way east finding roads as you go... there are MANY fun roads. Just watch out for the 35-45mph speed limits... all the PA residents ignore them but there ARE occasionally cops on those roads (rare mid-state... more likely in the Eastern part of the state/Pocono's... which I'd skip if I were you - not much fun).



To be specific - this is riding quality "By Dave's East Coast standards"... which need to be a bit more generous than West Coast. By West Coast standards there are very few good rides east of the Mississippi. (imo)
 

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Re; Safety Wiring necessities;

I'm interested in the art. Could you elaborate for us n00bs?
tools, materials, techniques?
Please start a thread on the topic.
I use a really old aircraft safety wiring tool. That's a 2 pound spool (stainless safety wire), which will probably last most folks a lifetime.

My biological father (I also had two step fathers, all before I was 12 years old) was an aircraft mechanic in the USAF on nuclear bombers during/after the Korean War in the "nuclear '50s", after that he worked in the airline industry for Pan Am, then he put in thirty three years with Lockheed. He taught me well.

That old tool still works just fine.

It isn't hard to do ... the main idea is to have the wire wrap the fastener so that it is always pulling the fastener "tight". When wiring two or more fasteners together, each fastener has to wrapped in that fashion ... so that the wire pulls on the fastener in the proper direction so that it's always pulling them tight. In the case of a nut on a stud, the stud itself is not drilled, only the nut is. The wire does not get threaded through any holes in the stud ... if the stud is drilled a cotter key is more appropriate.

What was demonstrated on that hub a few posts back was not an example of safety wiring, it was an example of fakery with the intention of "looking like" safety wiring. The person that posted it is fully aware of that and commented as such.
 

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Image #1 ... While the idea of wrapping the wire on the nut so as to pull it tight as shown in that image in that link is correct, I feel it should be pointed out that pretty much everything else about that picture is wrong. The nuts are not properly drilled, and there should be at least two (or even three) threads on the stud sticking out above the nut. Those nuts appear to be "aircraft locking nuts" .. the locking mechanism is not even engaging the threads on the stud ... totally wrong. In fact, if the wire breaks those nuts actually have a higher likelihood of coming loose and even falling off.

Image #2 ... properly drilled nut. Note how the wire goes in and right back out of the nut, rather than ~across~ the nut so the tension of the twisted wire is always able to pull the nut tight ... unlike how it was done in Image #1.

Image #3 ... some safety wring examples. Note how the twisted wire is always "pulling tight" on the fasteners. Also note that every fastener in that image is a bolt, not a nut. Which is why they are drilled "across the center" rather than drilled across the corner of each flat, which is how a properly drilled nut looks as seen in Image #2.
 

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Did you DIY the crash bars? I need those.

The Sargent (they need your seat pan sent in) has been awesome. I just completed a 300 mile loop in Socal. Up to Ventura, out Ortega hw and back. Then on down to San Diego.

If your ass is on the wide side, or you have a donk like me, the width is perfect. They have a prostate channel. A welcome addition! I wear padded bike shorts under Motoport mesh pants. Works well.

Did my DVT service and fork service at dealer last week. $2200 But they really did everything it needed, including an oil change and thorough chain cleaning/lube. Updated ECU and odds and ends. Started quicker, and gained a few MPG.
Sorry for the long delay.

I had the bike in for service so had them do the install. I probably should've done it myself as its a fairly "simple" install but, I typically don't mess with electric.

I'll look into The Sargent. Sounds perfect as that's my next upgrade - need a better seat than the stocker...
 

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I’ve never understood those studs Ducati uses with the recessed area on the end.

Nothing real fancy but good enough to pass tech inspection and no, sprocket bolts don’t need it for any racing organization I know of.














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I used this writeup for the general idea but put it together my own way.



I think there's some other threads on the forum about the same thing as well, but the basic idea is jumper the switched relay coil leads on the high and low beams together with a diode so whenever you run you highs the lows relay gets the same signal, but if you de-energize the highs the diode will keep the potential at the low coil lead from energizing the high beams relay.



It's stupid simple and isn't a permanent mod - you can pull it off in minutes if you decide you don't like it. But I frequently find myself riding with my finger on the passing light switch to get more light so I figured it was time to make it a thing!


I looked at the write up but I did not see a spec for the diode. Could you lead me to the specs for the correct one?

Thanks, wes


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I looked at the write up but I did not see a spec for the diode. Could you lead me to the specs for the correct one?
I just used a 1N4007 - fairly common diode that you can probably get from amazon / digikey / mouser / maybe local electronics hobby store? We have a bunch of them laying around work so I just went with that. Just be sure that the diode is pointed in the correct direction.

High beams ---->|---- low beams

if you go the other way around your highs will always be on
 

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Great info., also, for ppl planning to drill nuts like this, a fixture for your drill press is highly recommended


... properly drilled nut. Note how the wire goes in and right back out of the nut, rather than ~across~ the nut so the tension of the twisted wire is always able to pull the nut tight ... how it was done in Image #1.
 

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I’ve never understood those studs Ducati uses with the recessed area on the end.

Nothing real fancy but good enough to pass tech inspection and no, sprocket bolts don’t need it for any racing organization I know of.











VERY nicely done. The correct method used as well. Great examples shown there ... not to mention excellent photos.

My dad would approve. :wink2:
 

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I installed new mirrors. Had a tip over in the yard when I was washing it (top heavy bike and slight grade that was more than I expected). Only damage was breaking off the passenger mirror, so I went ahead and tried out the Puig hi-tech- type 3s. Easy enough to install, we will see how much more torque needed once I ride and they vibrate for a bit. Overall, meh, they look nice but don't sit well (appearance wise) in the stock perches. They also are about 25% smaller than the stock mirror glass. Stick out about as far, more adjustable but don't offer any better rear view.

Ill likely just get a stock one if I need to replace again. They do look nice, and the lines go well, but issues above irk me a bit. May even save the boxes and give it a ride, if the vibration is worse, may try to return.

https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/puig-hi-tech-type-3-mirrors
 
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