Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Whats the consensus on the best crash protection for the Multistrada ? Do you use crash mushrooms or the more rugged looking engine bars ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
If you are planning to go off-road a lot, those little pucks will not do much for you. I'd start with a good set of front end crash bars as a base-level and add from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
I don’t take this bike off-road other than some limited stretches of maintained gravel. So my first level of crash protection is to try real hard not to crash. The second level is good insurance with a low deductible.

It's a glib answer, but it has served me well over the last 25 years. In that time, I’ve had one crash, two drops, and one (more or less) unattended tip over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,202 Posts
Full face helmet, full coverage gear. ATTGATT.

My bike has the tipover protection on frame and axels, in case of a drop at low or no speed, but in a crash I don't think they will do much good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
Lot of good gear and body armor. For the bike on the street, nothing. Just another expensive part to replace in addition to the OEM's. I prefer a good insurance policy against a major mishap. For the bike on the track, engine case covers would protect against an oil leak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
I don’t take this bike off-road other than some limited stretches of maintained gravel. So my first level of crash protection is to try real hard not to crash. The second level is good insurance with a low deductible.

It's a glib answer, but it has served me well over the last 25 years. In that time, I’ve had one crash, two drops, and one (more or less) unattended tip over.
This is my philosophy as well, i have a BMW for light off road duty and i run a bash plate to protect the engine cast fins from stone damage, and that's it.

To me it seems pointless to insure your bike and then armour it to the teeth with extra weight and expense, i don't get that, sure i want my bike protected but to me it's a false economy..

This is my view of a typical scenario, you're out riding, you tackle something you shouldn't and have a low speed spill, you have crash bars, hand guards etc that take the brunt of the impact, but fuck! you're swingers has a gouge in it, or a wheel has a massive scratch in it..... Chances are you're likely to mark the bike more than the protection bits so what now? you make a claim? wear the excess and get it fixed, or accept it and ride with a scratched up bike?

I would much rather save the hundreds of dollars in crash farkles and the kilos of weight and enjoy the bike, knowing if a spill happens i'm covered and i have the excess because i haven't spent it on reducing the insurers liability (which you won't get a discount for, and they may argue about replacing come claim time even though it has saved them a fortune in parts and labour....)

I know, i'm cynical.... but we are dealing with insurance companies and until they offer discounts for protection that reduces their outlay in the event of a claim then fuck em, they can fix it all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
I use Altrider engine guards. They protect the expensive plastic in a low or no speed drop. The won't do much in a high speed crash. I was going about 35 mph when I hit a car that suddenly pulled into my lane. The bike was totaled. The car was totaled. I believe the engine guards kept my leg from being crushed between the bike and the car. I broke 3 ribs and punctured a lung but I was on skis opening day of the season 2 months later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Best gear I can afford for myself, good insurance policy for the bike. Outside of stunt riders and off-road applications, I don't really understand the purpose of all this crash protection stuff. That's what insurance is for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Maybe its different in the States, but over in the UK if you need to make a claim on the bike..it affects every other policy you have too.
I have no claims protection, but even that is not really what it seems, premiums still go up on renewal regardless. As I currently have 3 bikes and 4 cars ...claiming has to be kept minimal.
I was thinking more of stationary fallover protection really. I have a ZRX12 that has been on its side twice. Once in my garage and once in the queue for a ferry, when a "friend" dropped his bike onto mine..and I dropped on to the other friend alongside me. :)
In both cases the fact I had panniers on at the time and R&G crash bungs meant I only had a damaged mirror on the first one and a damaged indicator lens and new puck on the second one. No insurance claim needed ( I have a 400 quid excess anyway)
For the Multi, I kind of like the crash bar thing, but its just a pain to need to remove them if doing any maintenance sometimes. Hmmm, which way to go ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I love this thread. On other forums for other [not]adventure bikes, crash bars and "protection" are a religion. "Have good insurance" and "Don't Crash" are the best responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I love this thread. On other forums for other [not]adventure bikes, crash bars and "protection" are a religion. "Have good insurance" and "Don't Crash" are the best responses.
There's alot of sage advice in this section of the forum from riders with decades of experience piloting a large range of bikes. In my experience, the Multistrada isn't a high on most young or new riders' short list of desired bikes. So it would seem that a great number of the people buying these bikes are either older and/or more experienced riders. A larger percentage of new riders that I've known are younger, and they gravitate towards sport bikes. Not saying there aren't a bunch of 'old farts' still ripping it up on Panigales, or that there aren't many good young riders, but it would seem there's a reason why crash protection is "religion" on those other forums.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Have dropped my bike twice, operator error practicing turns and stops the first year of ownership. Barkbusters for the bar ends, RG wheel sliders and Altrider crash bars I put on my bike really protected my MS. Don't off road unless I need to. Any additional protection can only benefit any bike from minor drops. Can't speak for accidents from some idiot hitting me so far although have had some close encounters to avoid.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
175 Posts
There's alot of sage advice in this section of the forum from riders with decades of experience piloting a large range of bikes. In my experience, the Multistrada isn't a high on most young or new riders' short list of desired bikes. So it would seem that a great number of the people buying these bikes are either older and/or more experienced riders. A larger percentage of new riders that I've known are younger, and they gravitate towards sport bikes. Not saying there aren't a bunch of 'old farts' still ripping it up on Panigales, or that there aren't many good young riders, but it would seem there's a reason why crash protection is "religion" on those other forums.
When I was at a dealer talking about the people that buy multis the counter guy said "you know how many crashed multis we see come back, very very few"
I carry really good group insurance through work affiliation but will not every get collision. If I crash my bike unaided I'll fix it. History says this has kept my claims record spotless for decades despite a few oopsies. 100/300 with comp and $500 deductible is $606 per year. I'm a careful driver overall and haven't had a moving violation since 2004.

Agree with not crashing and good insurance being the best protection. I really want to install the rear axle slider for protecting the wheel but with no centerstand I use the rear stand method constantly to service the chain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
I really want to install the rear axle slider for protecting the wheel but with no centerstand I use the rear stand method constantly to service the chain.
That's a conflict of interest for sure.
Here's my 2 cents in a question format:
Why add un-sprung weight which needs to be removed for your rear stand?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,570 Posts
This spring I tossed my bike down the road @ 50 mph and my T-Rex crash cage saved both the clutch side fairings and the fog light. It only cost me $15 for the replaceable aluminum slider that mounts to the T-Rex crash cage.

And, truth be told, I like the look of the crash cage. Gives the bike that rugged look. Though I personally am more of a crochet and knitting kind of guy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,671 Posts
I ride dirt occasionally (dirt roads, some on the rough side) so got bars. Have had 3 or 4 sub 5mph drops in over 60000 miles and have never so much as scratched the bike because of the touratech bars (there are some scuffs on the right side pannier).

They're not going to protect from a real 'crash' as well... but IMO they've paid for themselves and are a good choice for someone who plans to occasionally hit the soft stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
Speaking from ‘experience’, having dropped the bike at 45+ (I dodged the deer, but....I was also HUA)....The bike slid approximately 30’, before going off a STEEP ‘cliff’ and stopping about 6’ down (if it would have flip once...it’d been gone). I got the bike back up on the road (Hwy 36), looked her over, got her started and rode her home, 110 miles. No clutch lever (that was fun with 2 stop lights at construction sites) and lots of left side damage. My crash protection consisted of axle and frame sliders (Speedymoto) and water pump slider. The rear axle slider saved the swing arm.....it had some minor scuffs, but that’s it. Without the rear slider..... front axle slider saved the rotor. The frame and water pump sliders saved.... Look at the left side of the bike and picture it sliding down the road w/out those sliders.

Advice: don’t ride HUA😁
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
I ended up with a GT, with engine crash cage as standard. While I haven't tested it out (yet), I feel it offers much more protection than frame sliders could. Removing the plastics a bit more fiddly, but not a big deal.

I've contemplated removing them to save some weight. However, I often ride up in the mountains away from civilization and frequently out of cell range. I decided that some protection may be the difference between a long walk and a longer tow versus the ability to get home under my own power in the event I go sliding down the road.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top