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I have an open clutch cover on my 1098 and I was wondering if I should swap it for a clear enclosed one. I commute and tour a lot, so my chances of getting caught in the rain are higher than average. How much damage does rain do to these? If it's just parts that will be swapped in a clutch swap then I'm not as worried. If rust will go deeper then of course i'm much more worried about it.

Thanks.
 

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An unsightly stock clutch and corrosion. At minimum if you want it exposed for visuals then opt for a billet pressure plate (which WILL fade over time) with stainless or titanium springs with anodised spring hats.
 

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Just paint the cover gold like a Panigale
 

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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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I have an open clutch cover on my 1098 and I was wondering if I should swap it for a clear enclosed one. I commute and tour a lot, so my chances of getting caught in the rain are higher than average. How much damage does rain do to these? If it's just parts that will be swapped in a clutch swap then I'm not as worried. If rust will go deeper then of course i'm much more worried about it.

Thanks.
Getting caught in the rain Is meaningless.

It’s like fretting over iron rotors rusting in the rain.




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Rain is no big deal. If you get it rained on, and then let it sit wet for a long time, then you might have a problem, but if you just make sure it's dry before you store it for more than a week, you'll be fine. Is it totally open, or a vented cover? I don't care for totally open, as there is the possibility of getting something caught in it -- shoelace, pants leg, small animals and children, etc. I like the vented covers, though. More of that festive jingling sound, and the clutch actually stays cleaner since the dust gets blown out as it is generated, instead of building up in there.

PhilB
 

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Use a solid cover, and paint it black. Don't make it a Panigale fakester wannabe.
The gold looks classy
Rain is no big deal. If you get it rained on, and then let it sit wet for a long time, then you might have a problem, but if you just make sure it's dry before you store it for more than a week, you'll be fine. Is it totally open, or a vented cover? I don't care for totally open, as there is the possibility of getting something caught in it -- shoelace, pants leg, small animals and children, etc. I like the vented covers, though. More of that festive jingling sound, and the clutch actually stays cleaner since the duct gets blown out as it is generated, instead of building up in there.

PhilB
Not if you've done the lithium grease trick ;)
 

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Ok ... you guys all understand that I'm just goofing around, right? This is all just bar room smack talk .... you get that, right? I've rec'd some ~suggestions~ via PM to cool it and not be "such a dick". Mind you, not from anyone that has participated in this thread as of yet.

Specifically my response to Member *Namor was pointed out ... not by any of the moderators, just by a "concerned observer" so to speak. So I just want to make sure no one is getting their undies bunched up, this is just a bit of kidding around. We good?
 

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Pros and cons:

  • Exposed to rain etc -> rust and possibly problems with clutch engagement. (minus)
  • Sound or noise that comes out of it. (what ever you prefer, I got annoyed with the rattle and went full carbon cover)
  • Possible dust and other dirt will be able to escape better when operating with open cover. (plus)
  • Exposed to crash damage. (minus)
  • Looks more trick. (plus, but full carbon cover is pretty sweet too)
 

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There is no downsides on open clutch. You buy Ducati because you want people to see and hear it. No other reason. And open clutch helps people to hear it more, so good thing. And when in short time you come here to ask why you can't put first gear on, we can ask if the pressure plate moves? And you can see it from open clutch. And if it doesnt move, then me, Xracer or Rex can tell you to bleed the god damn clutch and be done with it.
Also make sure you cut pieces off from clutch housing, it makes it even more noisy and race. Just like I did ;)

Open clutch.jpg
 

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There is no downsides on open clutch. You buy Ducati because you want people to see and hear it. No other reason.
You may find this hard to believe but some us buy them for their performance. I hate the noise of a worn out dry clutch but I love the ease of maintenance and adjustability.


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If Ducati designed them properly in the first place then they would be quiet and not batter themselves to death every couple of years.
Wet clutches are much smoother and far more maintenance free.
Dry clutches are great for racing and trackside maintenance but a dead loss on a road bike which most are.
Starbucks aside wet clutches are tops.
 

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I agree on a vented, but stock cover if you're thinking of getting it back to near-original.

The cheap fix is to place steel or brass grommets between the clutch cover and the crankcase. This will get air in to help cool the plates as well as allow the dust out (and probably all over your rear wheel).
 

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If Ducati designed them properly in the first place then they would be quiet and not batter themselves to death every couple of years.
Wet clutches are much smoother and far more maintenance free.
Dry clutches are great for racing and trackside maintenance but a dead loss on a road bike which most are.
Starbucks aside wet clutches are tops.
I suppose it depends in part on whether you know how to use a clutch. On my Monsters (M900, dry clutch), a set of clutch plates typically lasts 40-50K miles, maybe having to be shuffled and restacked once or twice. My original clutch basket lasted 140K, the second one only 85K, the third one had 40K on it when the bike was smashed. I liked the dry clutch. I've met lots of people who claim they can't get 20K out of a dry clutch basket and plates, but I don't think that's a desogn flaw -- that's the4 operator. No excuse for that unless you're dragracing.

Similar story on my Mini Cooper S. The first time I bought that, for my then-wife to drive, it was 8 years old (2002 model in 2010), and only had 50K on it. Shortly thereafter, the clutch went out, and that's a $3K engine-out job. I wondered if I'd made a mistake and it was a design flaw. But we went ahead and got it replaced, and she put 150K on it with no problem. Then I bought it from her last year, after the divorce (she needed a bigger car, and I needed any car because I had gotten to Minnesota on my Monster in October for a job project, and was staying through the winter). I've put another 10K on it since then, and the that second clutch is still fine. The first two owners just didn't know how to drive a stick very well.

PhilB
 
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I suppose it depends in part on whether you know how to use a clutch. On my Monsters (M900, dry clutch), a set of clutch plates typically lasts 40-50K miles, maybe having to be shuffled and restacked once or twice. My original clutch basket lasted 140K, the second one only 85K, the third one had 40K on it when the bike was smashed. I liked the dry clutch. I've met lots of people who claim they can't get 20K out of a dry clutch basket and plates, but I don't think that's a desogn flaw -- that's the4 operator. No excuse for that unless you're dragracing.
PhilB
Depends on what wear factor you are considering when saying the clutch lasted XXX number of miles. I have replaced clutches on my bikes not because the friction material wore out, but because the friction plate tangs and basket notches were so beat to crap that the clutch became too loud and clanky. Lots of life left on the friction material. Since discovering the quiet clutch mod several years ago, I am sure my basket and tangs will out last the friction material and probably the bikes in general.

I don't know that I consider the assembly beating itself to death (which is really only happening at at idle), a design flaw or simply the cost of using a "race" design on the street.
 

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I wouldn't know how to use a clutch properly, only been riding 51 years , still learning.
These clutches don't burn out, they wear badly and fast on the tangs and basket slots then get noisy and grabby, that's why the lithium grease treatment is so popular.
If Ducati need a steer in the right direction they could always have a look at what Lief in California does or Bob Newby in the UK does.
Ducati have a lot to learn about road bike dry clutches.
 
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