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the torque capacity is the ultimate measure of how much you can reduce the spring load. if you can add another friction plate that will up the torque capacity quite a bit.

playing with them as duc96cr says could be handy too.
 

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You should truly try the CBD cream. It’s been a life changer for me riding with arthritis in my thumbs. I use Hemp cream in a high strength 3000mg. It’s much cheaper than pure CBD , it has CBD in it, and still works well. I think I paid $26 for 4oz on Amazon. One can has lasted me all year.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Thanks for the tip, I'll give the cream a try. Youngsters reading this will wonder what we're going on about, but they will get there one day.....
 

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It's sorted! I managed to get out for a ride to one of my regular haunts yesterday, the distance of which is a proper test of my arthritic hand. About half way through the ride, my hand develops a pain across the back, where the tendons are, and by the time I've gone two thirds of the way I am in so much agony that I can't pull the clutch in. As soon as I pulled away yesterday I could tell that the clutch was lighter, and it sure made the bike more enjoyable to ride! I did the whole ride and did not suffer any pain at all.

If anyone wishes to have a go at it themselves (and you do this at your own risk) take off the clutch cover to expose the clutch and you will see the five springs; unscrew the allen screw holding each spring in place (do it one at a time to keep the clutch together) take out the screw, the cup under the screw and the spring. You will see that the spring cup tightens down against a pillar and this is where the new washer needs to go, to relieve spring tension. 1.5 mm is the thickest that can safely be added due to clearance issues. next, wipe off the spring and fix it in a vice until it becomes coil bound (in my case I left them compressed overnight) then making sure the spring is clean, insert it and the new washer and spring cup, and tighten the allen screw fully, then move onto the next spring.

Obviously, after doing this there is less spring pressure on the plates, so there is a chance of clutch slip, but as I don't ride hard, that is not an issue to me.

Thanks for the replies.
Any chance we can get some pictures of this? :grin2:
 

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If you compress a spring totally solid about 10 times over 97% of the set will be removed. Cycles to solid takes the set out of a spring, not one cycle held for a period of time. ( unless you heat it while compressed and cool it before release) .
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Any chance we can get some pictures of this?

Don't laugh but I don't know how to post pictures, so sis not take any, but working on the clutch is very simple.

I did measure the spring length and after compressing them they were 1mm shorter, so I'm guessing that it must have had some effect.
 

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Yes it shortened it 1 mm and reduced preload by that amount so lightened the clutch pull a little. It was pressing it solid that caused this, not holding it. It will creep back up just a little over time if it was made out of high quality wire.
 

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If I can find one of my old clutch springs I’ll calculate the rate . As belter said, the torque handling capacity of the clutch requires a certain minimum amount of clamping force and surface area, torque capacity. The higher the torque output the more you need to eliminate slippage. Many different Ducatis use that same clutch design, so maybe someone with access to the part numbers could figure out if different/lighter springs are used on lower torque engines . If so you could try putting lighter springs in every other spot. Adding clutch plates may not be an option as it might add preload. I’d have to examine the design to find out how much. I haven’t played with one in a while.
 

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I can’t find any clutch springs to measure. I just had a barn sale and when it was over I basically just threw everything back in there. Until I take a load to Good Will that’s going to be a NoFly Zone.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
The part numbers for the springs for the wet clutches for the big twins seem to be the same. I measured my springs at: length 49.65; id 14.5; od 19.85 and wire dia 2.5 with 9 coils, but it is hard to get an accurate id figure. I have found two springs in a catalogue that look like they will fit and I'll keep them in reserve if my hand plays up again.
 

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Did you check into the 620 spring cups ? An aftermarket slave can help . Search for an adjustable lever that has a better design for your hand. Sometimes you can’t fix a problem with just one modification, you have to do several things that each help a little. Even those rubber covers that slip over your clutch lever helped me a little. I don’t think aftermarket clutch springs are the answer. You could buy just one cup and spring for a 620 and see if there is a difference. If the wire is smaller diameter then they will probably soften the pull.
 
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