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Been there done that.Ride like I'm on ice the first 100-200 miles,slowly increase lean angle,throttle,and brakes till I hit that point..and still run 75-80% for a couple hundred more...Plastic is expensive...or worse.
 

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I find the trick is to gradually increase lean angle so that when leaned over the contact patch is never on 100% new rubber all at once. And when doing this absolutely no throttle or brakes, using 100% of available traction just for cornering. Even where I live where I have to look for corners I can have modern tires ready to go after a 25 mile ride.

Well, all except that last 1/2” chicken strip. I have to wait until I go to the mountains to scrub that.

And yes even on tires I’ve ridden all the way there from Texas that last 1/2” is squirrelly the first time over on it.


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Upon reflection, I still believe that his tires may have been on the old side, since they were Sporteck M3s, which are out of date. Old tires harden over time.

The other issue is "sport tires" per se. Today, I took my 999s out for a ride, with Dunlop Q2 sport tires. At the first corner, I took the corner a smidgen too hard, and the back tire slid out a bit, reminding me that when you're riding at 45 degrees F (7 C), then some restraint is in order. Obviously, for new tires - especially new sport tires in cold conditions - that is doubly true.

Ron
 

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Many high-performance summer tires for cars will void the warranty if driven in cold temperatures. "Dunlop's warranty states: "Ultra high-performance summer tires are not recommended for winter use, and tread or shoulder cracking on those tires resulting from winter use will not be covered under our warranty.""
 

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Two observations from my experience:

1 - I bought a wrecked Moto Guzzi LeMans for parts. The whole front end was destroyed and the frame was bent. The rear tire was brand new, which likely contributed to the crash.
Nah it was the Guzzi contributed to the crash. They are just more scary than a Duke and require a lot more skill.
Since I've owned this ST3 I have been learning to ride again after a decade on Guzzis. At last I can lean into a corner without fear. I had a Cali3, then a T3 with gofast gear and now still own the old Ambo from 1970. Riding that is like getting on a very dangerous dinky toy. No brakes, no power and very bad handling.
Both the Cali and the T3 could have benefited from a back tyre like the ST3 has and then there's the front end. The T3 had 38mm Marzochis which were pretty damn good but the frame was so short that the turn in was too fast for my level of skill so I have to say I was not of the right skill level for that bike. Another rider would have had a ball with it.
This ST3 however suits me perfectly and I have so much fun trying her out a bit more each time I go out.
And the new tyre I just had fitted on the front is behaving just right. The chicken strips are down to less than an inch which is a surprise after some of the cornering I did last week as I thought I was right over. It's great to know there's headroom . That's the comfort with this bike. Always more lean and more power and more braking left.
So all you need in a tight situation is the courage to give it that bit more or slam the brakes on that much harder.
Ride safe out there.
 

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I would like to add to the OP post to say that tires that in my experience tires that have not been ridden in a long time can exhibit similar behavior to new tires.

I have been extraordinarily busy with work this year and sometimes it is a month or more before I can get back on the bike. The tire rubber seems to oxidize a little over the period of a month or more and that first few miles seems to be somewhat slippery. I have to force myself to think and use a little caution for the first few miles until the tires get warm and rubbed off a little.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Tire date

Had a chance to check rear tire date: 2016
 

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Sorry to hear this. When I ran a shop in VIrginia, I used to politely request of our tech's to ride the bikes a few miles to scrub the new tires in. A few times I took a 3M scrubby to my own tires as I used to be paranoid about this exact type of crash.
 

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Personally, I've found it works best to head straight for the closest corners that will allow me to work up to using all of the available lean angle. Today in fact, I mounted up a brand new Shinko Verge front tire and headed straight for the nearest two corners just a few miles from my house. On the way over, the bike felt super sketchy which was I'm sure made worse by the tire's V shaped profile. Nevertheless, it only took about 4 times of going back and forth over the two corners until the tire was 100% ready to go full tilt. All in all, the tire was fully scrubbed in less than 5 miles doing this way; in addition, I now know it can be trusted at all lean angles from here on. From what I've experienced, the Shinko's aren't one of the quicker tires to bed in either.
 

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Honestly at around 50 deg, my experience is that sportier tires won’t get warm enough to be hard on them very easily. I rode on some Pirelli SuperCorsa SPs on my 899 in those temps once, it was like riding in the rain for the first 5 min and even then they were not gripping as well as usual. In summer I generally ride like 2 miles, then beat on them as usual with no issues.
 

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Just lost it myself

Interesting to run across this thread. Wish I had about two months ago when I put a new back tire on my GSXR 750. I have been changing tires on my bikes for 25 years or more and never experienced a new tire slip. In my case I attribute it to using a far amount of soap to get that big 180 down onto the rim. I believe I had some dried soap on the tire and then drove across the front lawn which was wet from the dew and there you have the deadly combination. Never had a bike fly out from underneath me like that. That was definitely a "what the fuck" moment. Fortunately it did very little damage. The Woods frame slider took much of the damage. I put bar end wieghts/throttle lock on that are solid steel and they held up great and the yosh pipe got a little scratch. Oh the mirror got a small scuff. The brake peddle needs bent back out or replaced but all in all I was very very lucky since my wife rides that bike to the gym often and it could have been her on the bike and she could have been wearing much less. This was a big lesson learned
 

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I learned this lesson the hard way when in 1996, I put a new set of tires on my 95 900 SS/SP (I think they were Dunlop 364's). I rode the bike 2 miles back from the shop and parked it in the garage. The next morning I fired the bike up in below freezing temps and ended up on my ass in the first corner leaving my neighborhood. It was a hard but valuable lesson, insurance totaled the bike and it's one of the few that I still really miss.
 

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I ran a shop in Virginia as GM for several years, and no matter what advice our Service manager gave to folks on new tires, we have people crash every year. The soap incident above is unique, but slowly scrubbing them with care is 100% a necessity. Sorry to hear of the initial posters get off.
 

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ArmorAll

This reminds me of a friend who cleaned his bike and used ArmorAll :surprise:eek:n his seat and tyres,guess what happened at the first corner
Yes! I did visit him in Hospital.
But, seriously when i put new tyres on I always clean the tyre with solvent and a brillo,3m scoring pad and give the new tyre a real good going over.
Never had problems at all.
 
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