Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So has anyone found a way of thoroughly washing the MS without causing rust on the rotors?.

There's that much salt spread on the uk roads, totally unnecessary imho as we've seen two frosts in a month where I live, however it becomes necessary to wash the bike regularly. End result, rusty brake discs. On a brand new bike.

In thirty + years of dozens of bikes, this is the first time I've had the problem. Also happens to be my first Ducati.

Best solution?.
Anyone?

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,021 Posts
I don't know how crazy you are trying to be about it. Each time my Bonneville gets wet, either rain or wet roads, I spray the discs off with a spray bottle of dish soap/ water and dry them. Then comes the part that may make your hair stand on end : I wipe them with a towel with wd40, then wipe them again. If I don't do this I have to knock the rust off the rotors with oooo steel wool and wipe them so they don't glaze the pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm not quite that crazy.

Dish washing soap is normally packed full of salt.
Wd40 is a lubrication.

Or are you talking about wd40 brake cleaner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
So has anyone found a way of thoroughly washing the MS without causing rust on the rotors?.

There's that much salt spread on the uk roads, totally unnecessary imho as we've seen two frosts in a month where I live, however it becomes necessary to wash the bike regularly. End result, rusty brake discs. On a brand new bike.

In thirty + years of dozens of bikes, this is the first time I've had the problem. Also happens to be my first Ducati.

Best solution?.
Anyone?

Cheers
This is nothing new. Every single vehicle that is equipped with cast iron rotors can have surface rust on the rotor surface, or any other uncoated surfaces for that matter. Every single car parked out in the rain will have surface rust on its rotors after sitting for a couple hours.

Solution: Ride more worry less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,021 Posts
No, you got it right, I guess I got your hair standing on end twice ! I'm only talking a few drops of about any kind of liquid soap that suits your fancy in a spray bottle of water. Actually what I'm using now is some general degreasing household stuff, I have no idea what's in it. I wipe it all off thoroughly. It's what I do, I have had zero issues. I think maybe you need someone else's solution, mine is not what you're looking for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,180 Posts
lift the front, fold a piece of fine sand paper over the rotor and give it a few spins. blow off with air. lower front. repeat with rear. ride.

or just ride.

people never notice the rotors of their cars/trucks after sitting for a week and drive on without a thought (or problem).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I leave my 15 Multi outside in the rain, covered of course; however, the brake rotors are always exposed to rain and likely salt mist. There is no way to prevent this as it is a function of the material. I would not recommend putting any WD40 or lubricant to prevent rusting out of fear of glazing the pads.

Best solution is to lightly squeeze the brake to clean the rotor surface or buy new aftermarket rotors of a different material. I suspect the current Ducati rotors are an alloyed steel. I think some of the others use a martensitic stainless steel, most likely 410 with higher chromium (Cr) content, which is responsible for making steel "Stainless".
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,281 Posts
Use a leaf blower to dry the rotors after a wash or a wet ride...

And if I had rust I would just apply the brakes slightly front and rear to scrub them a bit before needing to rely on them.

Nice to have a pretty bike , Look at some vehicles that never clean the rims and they are black with rust grime and brake dust ,

I like to use the brakes aggressively and heat things up to scrub the offending gunk off the rotors and pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
665 Posts
Not sure if serious about getting WD-40 anywhere near my brakes. Seems like that stuff will contaminate your pads the moment it comes into contact with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,386 Posts
This is nothing new. Every single vehicle that is equipped with cast iron rotors can have surface rust on the rotor surface, or any other uncoated surfaces for that matter. Every single car parked out in the rain will have surface rust on its rotors after sitting for a couple hours.

Solution: Ride more worry less.
:yeah: I live in California, where it hardly ever rains, and I have bits of rust on my brake rotors from the little bit of wet riding I've done. The brake pads will clear any rust on the important bits. The rest will just get cleaned when I wash my bike every other month or so.

I wouldn't spray WD40 anywhere near my brakes. That is a really bad idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Where i live, we do not have have snow, so i do not have the issue with salt, but what i do from time to time is that i use a brake and parts cleaner to clean the rotor. Works well for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
I think you worry too much. Even at places where salt is not used that often, you will get rust on your rotors after a rainy day. It's not a matter of quality. And the rust on your rotors is most probably material from the pads, not from the rotors themselves. It will be wiped away after you brake the first time. Having said that, sheltering the bike from rain as much as possible is always a good idea. Not so much for the rotors but for the rest of the bike (switches, chain, crevices in the motor where water can collect and leave dusty deposits etc.)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top