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Discussion Starter #1
I just decided to do the service on my bike so that means cam belts and valve clearances as well as the oil and coolant change.
When I pulled the horizontal cylinder exhaust valve cover I found a piece of one of the valve springs sitting down there .
So now I need to swap the spring there. I looked at Brad's explanation of how to change all the springs which involves total removal of cam , rockers, valves and shims .
I'm wondering if all that really needs to come out?
Would it not be possible to just extract the shaft out enough to free that one spring, which is on the belt side, while leaving everything else in place?
The other issue is why did it break and whether I really need to replace all of them?
Your thoughts would be much appreciated.
 

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The springs are known to break and I’m pretty sure the replacements address that issue. Mine haven’t broken (yet?) so I can’t comment on if it’s possible to swap them out by partially moving the cam. But...If Brad recommends removing the cams then I’m sure there’s a legitimate reason!


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Discussion Starter #5
I just got the new spring in with a minimum of fuss.
Removed the cover on the end of the camshaft, horizontal cylinder.
Removed the opening rocker and shaft with shim and clip and steel washers.
Pulled out the closing rocker shaft. The thread in the end is the same as my small fairing bolts and the shafts require no effort to withdraw.
Pushed the closing rocker down to remove the retaining clips and the closing shim.
Withdrew the broken spring with the closing rocker in the middle.
Placed the new spring in place with the closing rocker sitting in the middle. No fiddling required.
Pushed the shaft across into the right side of the spring[facing the rockers] and the closing rocker.
Used a screwdriver under the left [timing belt side]side of the spring to align it with the shaft.
Used a very light leather hammer to tap the end of the shaft which then engaged into the left side of the spring and straight into the housing with no problems.
Rotated the cam to allow the closing rocker enough room to refit the retaining clips.
Refitted the opening rocker.
Job's right. Took weeks of angst and half an hour in the doing. Not much more time than writing this.
Thanks for all the help and dire warnings. It's been an interesting journey.
Yorik you were correct. Easy Peasy.
Beemerboy, I asked that question about the ticking time bomb to Brad Black and he said not so much, that even if it were the vertical cylinder the piece would only go into the sump and likely find the plug magnet.
He is right for most scenarios but of course if a hardened piece of spring about 25mm long goes down your oil way and flies about in the sump it's actually anyone's guess where that could go. Mine being the horizontal cylinder the broken piece simply fell out when I removed the lower rocker cover.
Whether you should worry about it I wouldn't know except I'm not planning to worry till the next inspection in 10,000K's
My belts were done 9000K's ago and I found the horizontal one was too loose. This is my first time doing this service and I found the valve clearances were mostly slightly loose but opted to leave them until another 10K interval during which time I'll get a shim kit. It's a very nice feeling to remove the mystery [and expense] from this job as it may allow me to continue for a good while with Ducati ownership.
 

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As an ST3 owner this my attention.Mike, your comment implies that this problem is a ticking time bomb for ST3's, is it?
I wouldn’t say that...it’s just something that has come up a few times. I have 47k miles on mine...they’re fine!


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Discussion Starter #7
Now it won't start. Won't even turn over, just makes a ticking in the fuel relay.
So I pulled the tank and took out the pump etc. and blew it all out with compressed air in case mudwasps had got in.
Then when I attempted to refit it the big Oring got cut as it was too sloppy to sit in the rebate.So off to Desmo tomorrow morn for an Oring and a gossip about refuelling after a total tank drain.
I'm thinking it likely needs a full tank or there's going to be an airlock somewhere.
And I may have mixed up the fuel lines. One is marked 'R' and one 'M'. Does anyone know which goes to 'in' on the tank and which to 'out' ?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes I did leave that off, thanks. Just replacing the fuel filter and Oring, then I'll have another go at starting her.
Yep fired right up and idled well so I backed off the idle screw to where it was originally and it's idling smoothly. Must have been that broken spring putting the idle out all this time. Now to refit the fairing, the easy bit. Cheers guys , thanks for all your help.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I took it for a very pleasant spin to Lismore a few days ago. Runs beautifully, very happy indeed. Idles great at 1000rpm and cruises down my long drive without feathering the clutch now, but there were a few small pops round town. It's basically the same as when I bought it, but better, with the carbon mufflers that are a bit more open and I enjoy the way it runs with them, a bit free-er feel and a better exhaust note plus a fair amount of weight loss from the original pipes.
Next service I'll have a shim kit and I'll get serious about making the closers minimum clearance but this time I was happy to know that there was enough clearance everywhere for some trouble free riding and a new closing spring to boot.
I couldn't get any phone app to hear the belt twang so I set 'em by feel, not too tight and not too loose. Just hoping I got it all pretty right because this is inspiring me to continue along the wonderful Ducati path. It's a strange checklist but since I've owned this Duke it has actually cost me a fair bit less than owning a Moto Guzzi Cali3 which is sposed to be one of those reliable things that doesn't need much tweaking.
Mine had a cracked rear wheel rim that cost nearly a grand to rectify. At 80K it needed rings and while there, timing chain tensioner and seals. Soon after I got a scare and pulled the gearbox for a rebuild and new clutch and rear seal.
Had to delink the brakes early on with braided stainless lines and new master cylinder and that wasn't cheap.[Linked brakes Guzzi style are just idiotic.] The speedo had to be rebuilt at great expense. Then I fitted a new cam and followers which was cool but a bit pricey.
The electronic ignition failed so I re-fitted old tech points and dizzy that were on it till I parted with it. The exhaust dropped it's guts so I imported a replacement system from the USA, about $500 later. So a 'super reliable ' bike was almost entirely rebuilt during my custody and actually cost a lot more than a cupla timing belts and some really expensive oil on the Ducati. And I know what I'd rather be riding. Viva La Ducati!!!
Now I'm getting a hankering for those beautiful S4 Monsters. I see if a guy can service them they aren't out of the question and they look so great and have soooo much performance. Hmmmm, I'm probably too old for that but it's really tempting.
 

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I couldn't get any phone app to hear the belt twang so I set 'em by feel, not too tight and not too loose.
I've never had luck with phone apps either. I guess my phone is a piece of crap. I use the stand-alone Courroies program from JPDiag on a laptop with a microphone. Works great. I don't use JPDiag anymore, but I'm pretty sure the program was integrated into the diagnostic program so it's all-in-one now. If you want the stand-alone version send me a PM. The program is in English, but the setup is in French. Have your translation app handy.
 
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