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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
All,

Wanted to provide an in depth look at the valve adjust procedure for the SF/1098 (Testa Evo) style motors- coupled with the 7500k mile service. Back ground on the bike, bought from a car dealership in Missouri (traded in on a corvette- and I got it for a steal). Put about 4000k miles on it- between commuting and long bike trips (outside of the GSA it is a very friendly/easy bike to tour on). The bike as far as I can tell had the 600 mile service but nothing beyond that- I had my dealership do a look over the bike after I purchased it and had them change all the fluids. I changed the tires and had at it- I was coming up on the 36K (valve, throttle sync, belt, fluids/filters/sparks) on my beemer so I decided to tackle both maintenance tasks in the same week. By comparison the GSA valve train is very simple to work on BUT removing all the tupper ware and gadgets on the bike make tear down and re-installation a very tedious process.

For the Ducati- I rented (and will subsequently purchase) tools from Ducati Tool Rental. I was very pleased with the timely shipping and serviceability of the tools. The kit came with an assortment of shims, feeler gauges, engine turning tool, cam holding tool (for the belts), Harmonic adjuster, cam depressor tool, pulley lock, and two calipers for measurements. I got the belts from CA-Cycleworks along with a new airfilter and some o-rings. The remainder of the fluids/filters, washers, sparks, etc I purchased at the dealership (they have to stay in business too). I also will say that LT Snyder's Manual is a must have for doing this work- I booked marked each section and highlighted the procedures I thought were important enough to remember. Very insightful book!



I'll start the process post tank removal and into the radiator (assuming that the tank removal process is very simple).




Drain the Radiator- don't open up the cap unless you have one of the hoses clamped off (it will go everywhere). To speed up the process I opened up the overflow tank. I took a moment to inspect the hoses and over flow- didnt see any build up or congealing taking place so I did not flush. I will at 15K.


There are a pair of fan connectors (one on each side)- disconnect and move move to the side. There are clips to use a zip tie in- to keep them in place


Obviously remove all the hoses- there are three total on the top radiator- the two main tubes on the sides and one on top. And there are three bolts holding the top radiator in place. I removed the horn bracket out of the way to make things easier

Its a good idea before removing the final bolt to use something to catch the residual fluid coming out. There will be some in the vertical tubes.


Disconnect the radiator and move to the side.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Cont

On to the airbox- no need to remove the airbox. Just loosen up the clamps onto the intake manifolds (of course removing the air intake runners/filter element- good idea to inspect or replace the filter element)




I labeled these- be cognizant of the spacers on the airbox/runners.


Also remove or loosen the bracket- to move the fuel lines out of the way. In order to get to the valve cover screws.



Remove this hose (with a flat head screw driver). Then just lift up a little on the airbox and your done.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Cont...

Valve Covers
No big deal here- just remove the valve cover bolts (keep track of the bolts per head and the cable/wire holder on the vertical cylinder).


The vertical cylinder is tricky- pull to the rear and then up.

Lining up TDC/Belts




Install the engine turning tool-after you've removed the sparkplugs (there should be a tool in your tool kit)- and turn the bike to TDC lining up the mark on the output shaft.



Mark up your pulleys and take pictures- so you can count teeth and reference. Notice I did not mark the belts as I was replacing them after the valve adjust.


Remove the eccentric nut/eccentric and remove the horizontal and vertical belts. My belts looked good but were beyond their scheduled serviceable life- I will push to 12K miles and inspect every six from now on.


Remove valve cover- note green washers.

 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Cont

Valve train


Measuring Closers


Measuring openers

Most of my shims were good- mostly the exhaust closer clearances were a bit too open.

This is where the magic happens- Ducati tool rental and LT Snyder provide a good worksheet for calculating shims. I will say measure as many times as you have to and remember that adjusting the closing shim or opening shim will impact clearances on the other.




If you have to adjust shims then remove the cam journals and cams- I took a note from Slowowls post awhile back and marked both the bolts and the cams.



Use a large flat head screw driver to allow space from the rocker arm to work on the shims. The opening shim can be taken out with a magnetic pick up tool or a pair of forceps included in the tool rental (all mine but one came out with the magnetic tool- the other i used a forcep to remove). Then with the drift and a rubber mallet gently tap the closing shim down to expose the collets.


You can see in this picture where the collets are seated- use a magnetic pick up tool to pull them from their seats and then remove the closing shim.

You may go through this process several times until you get it right- I had to mostly because I didn't take my time and calculate the correct shims. I also tried too hard to get it exactly at the lower limits on both openers and closers. If the closers are too tight- they will tick and require re-adjusting DAMHIK! Measure again- once all the new shims are installed, rotate the cams by hand as much as you can and re-measure.

Also the only way to get a good measurement (from my limited experience) is with the cam journals on and the bolts torqued to spec. I usually didn't measure until this point because the first few times resulted in an incorrect measure.

A note about the collets- they can be a pain to get back on valve stem especially if things have gotten a little magnetized so use a dab more grease or a pair of good tweezers- then wipe off the excess. In order to seat the closing shims on the collets I had to give them a good whack with the rocker arm- nothing too dramatic just enough to seat the shim. If the shim doesnt want to seat, it was my experience, that it needed new collets and this fixed things up easily. I always replaced the screw driver in the rocker and ensured the closing shim was absolutely set! Replace the opening shims (or new opening shims) and begin the rebuild process.

Both cylinders and processes are the same- the manual and specifically LT Snyder's book give great detail on how to measure and the clearances to shoot for- I got them as close as I could without going completely over board.

Before closing things up (both cam journals and valve covers) I scraped off the excess valve gasket sealant that was on there and oiled up all the cams.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Final

Re-torque the valve covers and re-install the air-box completely. Make sure all connections are back on and snug clean up all additional oil/grease. I installed a K&N air-filter


Sealant/grease supplied with the K&N kit.

Belts-

This is the Harmonic measuring tool that came with the Ducati Tool rental kit- really easy to use.


Line up the pulleys and output shaft/pulley (vertical cylinder to TDC) and use a castle nut to assist in lining up the intake cam once you have it set- use the locking tool (provided in kit) to hold it in place. The exhaust pulleys will still rotate so make sure you accommodate for that when you install the belts and replace the eccentric. There are a couple additional methods to ensure you have things lined up in LT Snyder's book- that I wont go into but they are helpful as a backstop if your unsure- but take pictures before and after so that at a minimum you have a metric for what was right before you tore it down.

Once the belts are on- use the harmonic tensioner and eccentrics to get the right tension. It may take awhile but it does work, rotate the engine a couple times (to ensure things are moving well and are lining up), then replace the spark plugs and torque to spec.

Radiator goes on next- take your time filling it up as it takes awhile. I used engine ice this time around. Then belt covers. Then tank and additional plastics. My tank is expanding....

Ensure the engine turning tool is removed- and do a final check of bolts/torques.

Turn the key and fire her up- mine turned over easy both times- but I did notice and increase in valve clatter on the horizontal cylinder. There is a previous post on it- so being my first time I took everything apart and re-checked, I had nothing better to do and I enjoy the process (plus if your going to be stupid than...).

The second time- it started up and runs like a champ.

I also bled clutch/brake fluids and replaced all the brake pads.

After my 20 mile test ride I changed the oil and filter (replaced appropriate crush washer) but was unable to get into the separate deep sump oil filter screen.. Looks like I have to replace that lower gasket on the deep sump- any thoughts?

In the end the bike pulls like a freight train- no valve clatter and new belts and I'm good for another 7.5k. I can get to the valves in under an hour now- and really that's half the battle. I will submit, again, that the the bike is much less mechanically daunting than it was before- I will always have a ducati in the garage- now that I know they are not that hard to work on.

Final clearances- (mm)
Vertical Cyl.
Both intake and exhaust closers at .064 (R exhaust was a tight .076) **Did not shim down to .064 or .05 as it was already in spec
All openers were .127mm or 13mm

Horizontal Cyl
Both intake and exhaust closers .051 to .064 (and one at .076) **Same as above did not adjust already in spec
All openers at .127 or .13 mm

As you can see there is some variations- but all are well inside recommended clearance values.

Hope this helps.

jb

PS. If there are steps missing, corrections that need to be made- or tips that have been omitted to smoothen out the process please post them up!
 

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I second that.....FAQ-worthy without a doubt, nice work man!
 

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Great post! Thanks for taking time to put this up.


On mine, i'm considering upgrade to MBP shim and collets. I live close (well, 300 miles away) to MBP shop, and going that route, would extend valve adjustment at 30k miles interval. A bit more costly this time but could skip the next 2 valve adjust.
 

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You beat me to it!:)

The only thing I would recommend is plugging the oil return holes near the exhaust valves while doing the work, especially when removing the collets.

You can see the oil returns in the background and foreground of this pic....



I used m6 bolts I think, with enough safety wire attached to hook around the top of the cylinder head.

The wire is used so that I don't forget to remove the plugging bolts on re-assembly.:think:

Well done and thanks for the write-up.
 

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Fantastic write up! This will be incredibly useful. Thank you very much!
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Thanks

Thanks fellas- its the least I can do after all the time I spend on this site. It was frustrating finding info on the testastretta evo valve adjust procedure- specific to the SF. I spent hours searching and only found a few snippets here and there- LT Snyders' book was a big help.

Again, thanks- and here's to riding the piss out of those SF 1098s!
 

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Nice write up Tuck. Many will benefit from your efforts of taking pics and describing the work.

Just one comment: The opener and closer clearances are independent of each other. When the opener shim is changed out it will not affect the closer clearance and vice-versa. A way to visualize this is to understand that when the clearances are measured the valve is completely shut. The clearances are simply the gaps between shims and rockers. When you replace an opener shim, the valve has not changed its position so the gap with the closer shim will not change. Same if you change out a closer shim, the valve has not moved at all , so the opener clearance has not changed.

I think what makes it confusing is that the closing rocker has a spring that pushes up on it, so you dont see the gap under the closing rocker. But all the spring is doing is keeping the valve completely shut during a very small part of the the combustion cycle so the motor will idle smoothly. On many of the racing bikes, the spring is removed completely.
Mike
 

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Thanks Tuck. Well done.

I'll be doing mine shortly and have bookmarked this for reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Cool

Thanks Tuck. Well done.

I'll be doing mine shortly and have bookmarked this for reference.
Bly, All,

Please update this thread w/pics and tips that you learned from your experience- the idea being the more we learn collectively- the better.

Regards,
TnK
 
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