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Discussion Starter #1
There's a lot of discussion which has gone on regarding how the V4 Streetfighter compares and contrasts to competing bikes, but it's sort of jumbled around and buried in different threads. It might be helpful to have a have one place where we can keep all the stuff on this topic together for easy reference.

I haven't seen a proper shootout comparison yet from any of the usual sources, but I'm hoping to see some once the current crisis starts to subside.

Which bikes would you like to see reviewers directly compare to the V4SF?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here's the first video I've seen, which compares the Streetfighter to the Tuono.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This video compares the Aprilia Tuono Factory, MV Agusta Brutale 800RR, and 2020 KTM SuperDuke 1290R. The reason I'm posting it is the author says they're going to be picking up a 2020 V4 Streetfighter very soon and they intend to revisit the review to make it a more complete "naked shootout." Obviously, it's not a professional review, but it may have some helpful comments.

 

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Bon Vivant
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Here's the first video I've seen, which compares the Streetfighter to the Tuono.
I'm not really sure that comparing a 2016 Tuono to a 2020 SF is very relevant, I know that is the bike that the reviewer owns but its not exactly apples to apples. Comaprisons need to be with the 2020 Tuono, BMW s1000R, and KTM superduke, maybe throw in the new 208HP Brutale - not past models.
 

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I would say the usual suspects in the same genre of bikes, Aprilia Tuono (Factory) , KTM Superduke, etc.

I guess for me though I have already made my bed with the purchase of what I bought. So I am more than happy to sleep in it so to speak. Lol

usually once I buy something I don’t do a whole lot of comparison research anymore, usually shift gears into tuning, mods, suspension set up for the bike a just bought..

would be cool to read up on how it measures against its competition though...
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
This probably isn't a whole lot of help, but I'll throw it up here as it may be of value to someone.

The local dealerships here are open, but there are no V4SFs anywhere around to try. At least not yet. However, I was able to check out the new 2020 SuperDuke yesterday. Sadly, neither of the local KTM dealerships allow test rides, so this is only a first impression.

First impression. In person I would say it looks slightly better than the gen 2 SuperDuke. It's very aggressive looking and gives off a vibe that it means business. The instrumentation and controls are definitely an improvement from the older model. The buttons feel more premium and are easier to get to, and the display is actually quite nice for a KTM. That is often a weak point for KTMs, but the display on the new SuperDuke is clear, the layout is intuitive, and overall the style works well.

The riding position seems to be a tad more aggressive than what I remember on the gen 2 model. The handlebars are a little narrower and seem to be a little lower, tilting the rider forward just a bit. It's still pretty relaxed compared to a superbike, though.

Seat doesn't feel quite as hard as the old one, but it is quite high. I'm a big guy at just under 6'2", but I could only flatfoot it with a little effort. Leg room is excellent, though perhaps not quite as room as the gen 2. Overall, I would say it’s a really nice layout, especially for a larger guy.

The overall look of the bike and the fit and finish is pretty good. KTM is getting better here. However, I would have to say the new SuperDuke, nice as it is, still seems a little "plastic" in some respects. Yes, I know KTM is a company which prides itself on its minimalist design, but the bikes still lack the fit and finish of a Ducati. I haven't seen the V4SF yet, but I have no doubt it's similar to the Panigale V4, which looks like a work of art sitting on the showroom floor. In contrast, I would say the KTM is more of a no-nonsense, stripped down design.

Once I’ve had a chance to check out a V4 Streetfighter, I’ll post some thoughts on how the two bikes compare.
 

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I currently own a Gen 2.0, 2019 SuperDuke which i'm delivering to it's new home Saturday. The SDR is a better streetbike than the V4SF. More range, better leg room, cruise control. 5.0 gallon tank(I've seen 210 miles to a tank). For most people who don't explore the outer edge of the performance envelope, the SuperDuke wins hands down. I do track and am fast level 3, A group depending on your naming. On it's side, the SF shines. So much front end feel, better braking, more agile handling than the SDR. Comfort is good on the SF, it splits the Tuono and SuperDuke right down the middle. I rotated my bars back a few degrees as I have an overnight ride coming up soon. For sport, i'll put them back forwards. The seat on the SF is too soft in my opinion, and has too much grip. I cant move around on it. I have the comfort seat coming this week. I'm absolutely in love with the refinement of this bike, however they took a little too much of the rawness out of the lower gears. A good tuner should be able to get that back once they access the throttle maps.
 

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I agree with most of those statements for sure. More range, more comfort, cruise control, man what’s not to like..
My experience with the Gen. 2 SD handling claims were very different than yours though.. granted I never owned one (specific set up for me- which I know can yield big impact) but I rode 2 different gen. 2 SD that reacted the exact same with me riding it.. Both bikes had a pretty bad tendency to run wide under power out of a corner and both bikes did not like being trail braked into a corner(bike always was fighting to stand up while trail breaking) During the total of maybe 6 hours of saddle time between the two bikes, the handling when pushed hard just felt like it was working against me a bit not with me for lack of a better description... Both owners confirmed my findings when discussed with them probably not as bad as I experienced as I was heavier than both owners.. other reviewers have mentioned this in a few reviews as well. Especially during the reviews of the Gen. 3 SD when comparing the chassis changes and the traits of the old bike KTM wanted to remedy...

having said all that, most of my critique is when riding the bike really hard on track which one shouldnt be riding the same way on the street so not that big a deal. When ridden on the street these observations were still there but no where near as prominent...

Definitely I great bike ,but I definitely don’t think it handles better than my new SF, that’s for sure.... apparently so does KTM as they made major upgrades/changes to the new one...
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
While inquiring about an exhaust system for the Streetfighter, I asked about the comparison between the V4SF and the 2020 SuperDuke. I asked because I heard Austin Racing has an upcoming review of the SF and have also done a review of the SD, putting them among the very few people who have tested both bikes extensively. YMMV.

I am re-posting this here with permission.

Austin Racing said:
On the 2020 KTM 1290R vs 2020 V4 Streetfighter.

Depends what you are looking for in your next bike. If you want lots of smiles, easy to ride, massive torque = massive fun, then it’s the 1290R all day long. I had to lower my pegs to give a more relaxed riding position but then it’s perfect.

The Streetfighter makes its power so late in the rev range it becomes a handful to ride fast for a naked, and not nearly as easy to ride and not nearly as much fun. Cramped so also needs lower pegs.

To me what sums them up is when you ride the 1290 you never want to go home, when you ride the Streetfighter you feel lucky you made it home!

The 1290R looks better and is very obviously the 3rd gen, well sorted great bike. Streetfighter is obviously the first attempt at a V4 naked and misses the mark by some way in my opinion.

Rich
Austin Racing said:
If you are thinking about what bike to get.. go for the Superduke... we have ridden them back to back and I can assure you the Superduke is the better road bike and track bike...

James
 

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Just watched their review of the KTM SD, reading above , hell I am kinda looking forward to riding it as well. They mentioned that they were coming out with a comparison video soon as well..
They definitely are KTM SD enthusiasts as they also explain that they have owned every generation of the SD..
 

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Bon Vivant
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Just watched their review of the KTM SD, reading above , hell I am kinda looking forward to riding it as well. They mentioned that they were coming out with a comparison video soon as well..
They definitely are KTM SD enthusiasts as they also explain that they have owned every generation of the SD..
Thats the thing, KTM fans are rabid loyalists and will defend the brand no matter what the facts are. There is no stronger flavor of koolaid than orange.
It is impossible to do impartial reviews if the reviewers have already made up their minds.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thats the thing, KTM fans are rabid loyalists and will defend the brand no matter what the facts are. There is no stronger flavor of koolaid than orange.
It is impossible to do impartial reviews if the reviewers have already made up their minds.
Yeah, KTM has some loyal fans for sure. However, it isn't like the Ducati community isn't known for that as well. And let's not even get started on the Harley loyal...

As far as the review goes, I'm glad Austin Racing did it but I think it's fair to say they'll need to step it up in future reviews if they want people to really pay attention.

One thing is for sure. People seem to have pretty strong opinions on the whole Streetfighter vs. SuperDuke debate. If you look at the various Facebook groups, it's quite interesting how people are reacting to the overall design of these two bikes, the looks, etc.
 

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I agree with most of those statements for sure. More range, more comfort, cruise control, man what’s not to like..
My experience with the Gen. 2 SD handling claims were very different than yours though.. granted I never owned one (specific set up for me- which I know can yield big impact) but I rode 2 different gen. 2 SD that reacted the exact same with me riding it.. Both bikes had a pretty bad tendency to run wide under power out of a corner and both bikes did not like being trail braked into a corner(bike always was fighting to stand up while trail breaking) During the total of maybe 6 hours of saddle time between the two bikes, the handling when pushed hard just felt like it was working against me a bit not with me for lack of a better description... Both owners confirmed my findings when discussed with them probably not as bad as I experienced as I was heavier than both owners.. other reviewers have mentioned this in a few reviews as well. Especially during the reviews of the Gen. 3 SD when comparing the chassis changes and the traits of the old bike KTM wanted to remedy...

having said all that, most of my critique is when riding the bike really hard on track which one shouldnt be riding the same way on the street so not that big a deal. When ridden on the street these observations were still there but no where near as prominent...

Definitely I great bike ,but I definitely don’t think it handles better than my new SF, that’s for sure.... apparently so does KTM as they made major upgrades/changes to the new one...
Mine had traxxion dynamics carts, proper springs and an ohlins TTX, 12mm longer than stock, with proper springs.

The SF destroys the Gen 2 SDR on chassis feel and front end feel, most people honestly don't push hard enough to feel the difference. My stock SDR front was vague and had some mid stroke compression ramp up, and front and rear felt mistmatched out of the box, which is why I did upgrades. The two ends lacked balance as delivered.

Chassis feel on the SF, on the edge is next level, braking goes to the SF as well. The cornering abs on the SDR acted up from day 1, but the bike was delivered with a ton of air in the system

Dynamically it was a great bike, but as a brand, KTM is behind Ducati in QC. I had some minor issues with mine, all worked through now. The new owner is blown away by the SDR.

I definitely experienced the KTM guys kool aid consumption. I complained of the brakes and a couple other issues, and I may have well condemned Christ himself.

I guess on this side of the house we do the same. Multistrada fuel sensor and key fob issues. Swollen 1198 tanks.

Ducati has its quirks, but as a brand, Ducati honestly stirs my soul.
 

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Mine had traxxion dynamics carts, proper springs and an ohlins TTX, 12mm longer than stock, with proper springs.

The SF destroys the Gen 2 SDR on chassis feel and front end feel, most people honestly don't push hard enough to feel the difference. My stock SDR front was vague and had some mid stroke compression ramp up, and front and rear felt mistmatched out of the box, which is why I did upgrades. The two ends lacked balance as delivered.

Chassis feel on the SF, on the edge is next level, braking goes to the SF as well. The cornering abs on the SDR acted up from day 1, but the bike was delivered with a ton of air in the system

Dynamically it was a great bike, but as a brand, KTM is behind Ducati in QC. I had some minor issues with mine, all worked through now. The new owner is blown away by the SDR.

I definitely experienced the KTM guys kool aid consumption. I complained of the brakes and a couple other issues, and I may have well condemned Christ himself.

I guess on this side of the house we do the same. Multistrada fuel sensor and key fob issues. Swollen 1198 tanks.

Ducati has its quirks, but as a brand, Ducati honestly stirs my soul.
Ah yeah, nothing like a well set up bike. Makes a huge difference for sure...
“.KTM Kool Aid”. Lololol. That is funny. You are correct though, although I have many different brands of bikes I can be a bit if a Ducati fanboy.. I guess we all have our favorites that we are all passionate about ....

to be honest, I have had no more issues with my KTM’s than I have with my later Ducati’s . My 625 SMC I had not one issue in 8500 miles. My KTM SA1290R that a currently own, I have had 2 small issues that were easily sorted , so pretty good ownership experience so far.. my Ducati Multi Pike Peaki absolutely loved BUT I went through 6 fuel sending units in the 2 years I owned it and 2 rear brake master cylinders during the 2 years as well. I had never had anywhere near that many issues with any Ducati I had owned prior and it just killed the ownership experience. As much as I loved the bike , I drove me crazy with all the issues and I eventually parted ways with it...

just about all major manufacturers build good products these days but just like you, Ducati since my first Ducati back in 97’ Has stirred my soul ever since...
 

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My Multi, 2012, would lose rear brake pressure randomly, I added speed bleeders at the ABS box and bled the rear at oil change intervals and stopped having issues. I only went through 1 fuel sender, it never stopped working, but it physically failed due to ethanol. Cracked and swelled at the large plastic but, enough to drip fuel. The newer version 'D" was metal.

My key fob would lose signal, but once they did a software update, I had no more issues with that. I put 28,400 miles on it from new.
 
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Thats the thing, KTM fans are rabid loyalists and will defend the brand no matter what the facts are. There is no stronger flavor of koolaid than orange.
It is impossible to do impartial reviews if the reviewers have already made up their minds.
This is one reason why I really don't put too much weight into motorcycle reviews. We all have different machine characteristics that we're interested in, but we also all have different physiologies; I'm fairly big at 6'2" and 185, but for some reason my combination of long legs and short torso make me all-day comfortable on a bike that most people find torturous. I also have a strange fascination with schizophrenic motors, and I love the idea of a bike that has an almost dual-nature depending on where you are in the RPM range, so I loved the thought of a V4 from Ducati, despite the obvious superiority of a twin cylinder engine when on the streets. Because I'm a bit of a Ducati fanboy, I'll forgive weaknesses in a bike that I'm interested in from them that I may damn from another manufacturer. I don't know man, there's such an element of je ne sais quoi when choosing a motorcycle that actually thinking about it too much is almost counterproductive. Why else would I have given my dealer $1000 down on a bike back in November with nothing buy my fevered imagination to inform me what it might be like (should it ever actually arrive).
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
It was a very near-run thing between the V4SF and the new Super Duke. The SD is cheaper and has a lot of the creature comforts and low-end grunt that I like, but the Ducati has better fit and finish, better sound, and probably better overall reliability. Also, KTM is making it really difficult to install exhausts, so if you want a decent sound you have to be willing to put up with some convoluted workarounds, and that is really a turn-off for me on a brand new bike.

Since I already had a deposit on the SF I decided to stick with it and see how I like the V4 for a change.

Mine has arrived and is almost ready for pick-up. Just have to decide if I want any aftermarket stuff.
 
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