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Discussion Starter #1
Ready for all comments before l change 6000ks out of the rear corse III 's

ran 38 PSI rear , 34 PSI front city hoon riding only
been though search archives many have changed tyres since then

all feed back welcomed
shanetbird
 

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Ready for all comments before l change 6000ks out of the rear corse III 's

ran 38 PSI rear , 34 PSI front city hoon riding only
been though search archives many have changed tyres since then

all feed back welcomed
shanetbird
38 in the rear is awfully high.
 

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38 in the rear is awfully high.
Agreed. That thing must ride like a brick. For urban riding, try 32 psi (cold)
in both tires. For serious sport riding and track days, I use 29-30 psi cold
pressures, which when lapped at speed gets up to about 34 psi hot.

I'm using the Pilot Power 2CTs and love them, but as with oil, everyone has
their own opinions on tires... A number of riders have been going with a dual
compound supersport tire up front mixed with a sport/touring tire in the rear
(like the Michelin Pilot Road). Since the rear gets thrashed twice as quickly
as the front, it tends to lower expenses to use a more durable tire in the
rear for street riding and commuting.
 

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at the minute i'm waiting to get a dunlop roadsmart fitted to the rear so
bx 14 ready to change at 2300miles
 

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Great Post!! I am in the market too!! I always bought Michelin Pilot Powers so now thinking the 2ct's// Very the money you cant beat the performance!
What else is a great street/grip/track/price tire!! ?? :confused:
 

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air pressure is different in oz ... something to do with the coriolis force. :rolleyes:

Agreed. That thing must ride like a brick. For urban riding, try 32 psi (cold)
in both tires. For serious sport riding and track days, I use 29-30 psi cold
pressures, which when lapped at speed gets up to about 34 psi hot.

I'm using the Pilot Power 2CTs and love them, but as with oil, everyone has
their own opinions on tires... A number of riders have been going with a dual
compound supersport tire up front mixed with a sport/touring tire in the rear
(like the Michelin Pilot Road). Since the rear gets thrashed twice as quickly
as the front, it tends to lower expenses to use a more durable tire in the
rear for street riding and commuting.
 

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I run CT2's on the 748 with the same pressures & they work really well on clean roads.
Rear wears quite fast, but that's not an issue.
They don't like the dusty roads here in the sugar cane harvesting season though.
Anyone using the new Bridgestones?
 

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Pilot Power front at 30 PSI and Pilot Road 2C and 30 PSI, great combo, traction and wear.
 

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If you boys in the States have a Cycle Gear near you, they are having a pretty good tire sale on many brands. I always get 15% off coupons too, so I am going to pick up a set of the Dunlop Sportmax Q2s. I have been runnning the PP 2CTs and have no complaints running 36f/32r around town and 34/31 in the tight stuff. I get about 2500 miles out back and double up on the front.

Out~
 

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Discussion Starter #11
tyres and pressure

38 in the rear is awfully high.

Will try the lower pressure , damn ducati dealer was very specific
about . that :think: ?? no wonder my ass is so %F^%$en saw


as for Bar the only bar ozzys are interested is the ones you get a BEER :rolleyes:
 

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Glad that you posted these pressures..checked em on my new 09 that I have had for a couple of weeks and the rear had 32 cold, but the front only had 26 lbs.
 

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Load Rating, etc.

Over the years I've gotten a lot of comments from guys who are confused
about the tire pressure stickers on the bike and the numbers on the tire sidewall
itself. Most of these pressures have to do with load rating and/or max pressure
allowed. They are not guidelines for sport riding. The sticker pressure is the
recommended pressure for meeting the max gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR),
a pressure that is good for carrying your (full-bodied) adult passenger, but that
is about it. "Sticker pressures" and tire sidewall pressures are an indication of
the recommended pressure for maximum static loads on the tire, since the tire
sidewall will flex more at lower pressures and reduce the safe max load/weight
capacity.

If cornering performance and ride quality is of more interest to the rider than
using the bike as a freightliner, then there are much better tire pressure settings
that can be tried, generally 10-20% _lower_ than the max pressure numbers.

Another point of confusion: since a softer tire (one with lower air pressure)
flexes more than a harder tire, it will self-heat more (when ridden hard)
than it would if run with a higher starting air pressure. Since the heating of
the tire also adds air pressure as the hot air expands, the soft tire ends up
being harder than the hard tire! :rolleyes: Well, a tire at 34 psi/220F degrees is a
different animal than the same tire at 34psi/170F! While the softer tire
does indeed heat up more than the harder tire, the increase in tire temp
is more significant than the increase in heat-induced pressure. The bottom line
is that for track-type use, a tire with optimum cold (starting) pressure will
heat up and become tacky/grippy in the corners, while a tire with too low
of a cold pressure will overheat and have a greasy feel, and on race tracks
will "collect" other rubber off the track in clumps on the tire surface or have
a melted appearance. Starting with a _too high_ cold tire pressure results in a
a smaller contact patch and poor grip that doesn't "come in" after a warm-up.
The "too hard" tire will skitter and slide, and never get the optimal grip or the
planted feel a "correctly" inflated tire will see.

To make matters worse, on hot/sunny days, the track surface temperature
will get so high that most soft compound tires will overheat and get greasy
regardless of optimal starting pressure. In this case, nothing but a change
to a different rubber compound can help.

BTW, I'm no tire scientist, so if anyone wants to chime in here, please do.
It's just annoying when you have motorcycle dealers telling customers to
run max tire pressures without any regard to the type of riding.
 

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I'm at almost 1900 mi. (street only) on the OEM BT-014s and the rear is worn to the wear bars, pretty much evenly from edge to edge. The front is worn out as well, but only on the shoulders--the middle still has lots of tread left. This makes for a "V" shape on the front that doesn't do much for linear handling characteristics.

Overall, I like the Bridgestones and was thinking of trying the BT-016s next, but I'm concerned about the front wear pattern and don't want to make it even worse (as the front on the 016 is a dual-compound with softer edges). On the other hand, I don't really think it's the fault of the tire or that the result would be any different with another brand, so...

EDIT: Running same pressure both ends, around 30-31 psi
 

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I'm at almost 1900 mi. (street only) on the OEM BT-014s and the rear is worn to the wear bars, pretty much evenly from edge to edge. The front is worn out as well, but only on the shoulders--the middle still has lots of tread left. This makes for a "V" shape on the front that doesn't do much for linear handling characteristics.

EDIT: Running same pressure both ends, around 30-31 psi
I've also seen that "V"-shape quite a bit on front tires, especially if you're doing
a lot of high speed sweepers that don't require much braking before the turn.
The rear tire evens out because the acceleration forces wear the middle,
but without a lot of hard braking, the middle of the front tire has it easy.

It happens on both single and dual compound front tires, but you have a point,
the dual compound would seem to make the "V" tendency worse. I think the
Hyper actually benefits from a tire that tips in quicker (as opposed to a flatter
profile tire like the BT014), but that's just my opinion...

:alien:
Meanwhile, johnchypermotard is still wondering why there are so few Ducati
girls in his favorite haunts in the Castro... and what's odd about the ones he
does find :eek:
 

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I've also seen that "V"-shape quite a bit on front tires, especially if you're doing
a lot of high speed sweepers that don't require much braking before the turn.
The rear tire evens out because the acceleration forces wear the middle,
but without a lot of hard braking, the middle of the front tire has it easy.
I agree it's a normal tendency; I guess what surprised me about it in this case is the severity. The front actually wore out slightly faster than the rear. I've never seen that before. Also, judging from the pattern of the wear, it was caused more by trail braking into tight turns rather than by sweepers (I don't ride many fast sweepers). The leading and trailing edges of the tread blocks on the edges of the front tire are heavily scallopped, or whatever the term is, consistent with braking forces.

Anyway, I think it's more the bike (and the riding style it encourages) than the tire. I don't mind replacing the tires frequently, I just wish the front would hold its profile longer.
 

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I agree it's a normal tendency; I guess what surprised me about it in this case is the severity. The front actually wore out slightly faster than the rear. I've never seen that before. Also, judging from the pattern of the wear, it was caused more by trail braking into tight turns rather than by sweepers (I don't ride many fast sweepers). The leading and trailing edges of the tread blocks on the edges of the front tire are heavily scalloped, or whatever the term is, consistent with braking forces.
Trail braking? TRAIL BRAKING???!! Is that ALLOWED? :eek:
Oh that's right, someone lifted the ban on trail braking. Sorry. As you were.

You know, some schools of thought trace every tire issue to rebound damping.
Or trail braking out-of-season without a permit...
But wearing out the front tire faster than the rear-- I'm pretty sure _that's_
illegal in some states (even where trail braking is allowed). And it makes a
complete mockery of all the bold statements some of the people on this
forum (including me) have been saying about the back tire wearing out
twice as fast as the front. So stop it and conform, dammit.
 

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I wore out my rear Scorpion Sync in 6008 km and the front Scorpion Sync in 6500 km so nearly wear for wear, this is the most I have EVER got from a rear tyre.

I only use my brakes to come to a stop, other than than not very much at all.

Doesn't really matter anyway just as long as Shane keeps posting and replying and we can gork at his car :D
 
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