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Discussion Starter #1
Could I be subconsciously leaning much more aggressively to the right than to the left. I noticed the chicken strips are nearly twice as wide on the left side of both tires than the right (maybe 1 inch versus 1/2 inch). Anyone else have this sort of thing happening or am I just a psycho?:confused:
 

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Most people favor one side over the other. You might be leaning farther over
on one side, or hanging off more on one side rather than the other. You're not
psycho, you're normal.;)
 

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I know I scrub the left side of the tires better than the right because I always have this twinge in the back of my head that if I lose control in a right hand turn I am going into oncoming traffic whereas in the left I am hitting shoulder and crap and more liable to walk away having only screwed myself up....so I push it a little harder going left.....at least that has been on the conscious portion of my mind anyways!
 

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Yeah that seems pretty normal. I scuffed in a new set of tires today and the left side always loses the nipples first.
I think that I like lefts because you can see deeper into the corner.
 

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There has been much discussion on this. One reason is crowned roads will wear the left side faster.. The other is that in countries which drive on the right side, left turns are longer than rights. I know it doesn't sound like much of a big deal, but think about how much longer you are "into" a left turn versus a right.
 

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Bodhi said:
Could I be subconsciously leaning much more aggressively to the right than to the left. I noticed the chicken strips are nearly twice as wide on the left side of both tires than the right (maybe 1 inch versus 1/2 inch). Anyone else have this sort of thing happening or am I just a psycho?:confused:
Absolutely normal. Just as we all favor our right or left hand, we tend to feel comfortable leaning to one side or the other in a turn.

On average, most people can get a mean lean into a right turn, but are more "chicken" when going to the left. That is why many members have trouble and have to really concentrate when making a U-Turn to the left.

Out-of-context - Don't ever get caught up with the appearance of chicken strips. While some indications of leaning into a turn is appropriate, to me moderate chicken strips indicate is that the rider is safe.

Now if there is no wear on the sides at all, that may say the rider is too nervous or stiff a rider, but I have never seen tires with no wear on the sides at all. Not that I look for the magnitude of chicken strips on bikes I see on the road. IMHO it's a stupid gauge of one's riding abilities.
 

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I think there is more "room for error" on a lean to the right. If you lean too far to the left near the centerline, the oncoming truck mirror takes off your head.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
allikanbe said:
I think there is more "room for error" on a lean to the right. If you lean too far to the left near the centerline, the oncoming truck mirror takes off your head.
You know that is something I have consciously thought about. When I'm riding along a narrow snaky section and I'm well into my lane and then lean hard left I get the nervous feeling the side mirrors of passing cars are only a few feet from my head. I get astonished looks from the cagers sometimes. It makes me set the line on the left handers further to the right than I would were I on a track. That probably sets me up to take the left turns more slowly and cautiously. Just the realities of street riding I suppose. My previous bike was a cruiser and I never noticed this phenomenon because I never really rode that hard.
 

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Bodhi said:
When I'm riding along a narrow snaky section and I'm well into my lane and then lean hard left...... It makes me set the line on the left handers further to the right than I would were I on a track.
you should be setting yourself to the outside of the lane in a left turn anyway IMHO because that is the position in the lane where you get the most siteline of what is coming around the corner unless you are riding in flat and unwooded areas where you can truly see around the corner before you get there....you would not normally and should not normally be thinking of taking a turn along what you'de normally see on the track as the raceline as it were...that is where street and track riding differ for me...where I set up my line and how I push it on the street is based on how the trees wrap the turn and telephone lines and other visual cues that tell me what is ahead....but it is mostly with the thought of not getting hit by oncoming traffic....but I think most people know this...or so I thought!
 

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I agree with Zoom 100%. Keith Code has at least 1 chapter in "Twist of the Wrist" about why you need to set up wide and delay your apex. Actually "Proficient Motorcycing" explains this really well also. Not only does this keep you head and mirrors in your lane, it also protects you from cars in the opposing lane crossing over the line and into your lane.
 

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Hi Butch, I noticed that you were always leaning a little left... J/K :)

My tiers always do that and so do Joyce and Carls. I think the crown on the road has some impact but with our blind corners we can always have a better line of sight in the left turns where the extra lane keeps the brush and hills that much farther away. Think how many times in a right turn where the cliff fave is right where you can touch it. I get slapped with branches often.

For me, I do favor my left turns any how, always have and it pisses me off. The race bike has the right side melted off and the left is like new because of the way the tracks around here go.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
zooom said:
you should be setting yourself to the outside of the lane in a left turn anyway IMHO because that is the position in the lane where you get the most siteline of what is coming around the corner unless you are riding in flat and unwooded areas where you can truly see around the corner before you get there....you would not normally and should not normally be thinking of taking a turn along what you'de normally see on the track as the raceline as it were...that is where street and track riding differ for me...where I set up my line and how I push it on the street is based on how the trees wrap the turn and telephone lines and other visual cues that tell me what is ahead....but it is mostly with the thought of not getting hit by oncoming traffic....but I think most people know this...or so I thought!
Point taken. On further reflection, I think I'm staying further to the inside mainly when there is loose dirt/gravel near the shoulder - a fairly frequent thing on narrow backroads around here - especially with all the construction everywhere. In these cases I do slow it down and keep a reserve for contingencies - like potholes and dead squirrels. And I'm not drifting over the centerline, but on narrow roads get a more uneasy feeling when my head is toward oncoming traffic than when it is leaning toward the shoulder. This might explain why I lean harder to the right than to the left. It is certainly possible I am doing too early of an apex on these kinds of roads. But the feeling of my head being too close to oncoming mirrors is something that made me adjust my lines a bit and change my riding style. As for the uneven tire wear, I still buy into the notion that most of us psychologically lean harder to one side than another for some reason.

Ciao
 

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GordyNM said:
There has been much discussion on this. One reason is crowned roads will wear the left side faster.. The other is that in countries which drive on the right side, left turns are longer than rights. I know it doesn't sound like much of a big deal, but think about how much longer you are "into" a left turn versus a right.
Here in England we have a lot of 'Roundabouts' which many use for knee-down practice ;) couple that with the fact that most roads have a camber running off to the side and that generally speaking on many of the hedge-lined country roads there is better forward visibility through right-hand curves than left (allowing faster safe cornering) means that, for many, the right side of the tyre tends to wear faster/further than the left (we ride on the left side of the road), presumably in the US, although I believe roundabouts are a rarity, the opposite applies?

What I need to find is a 'deserted' roundabout for left side scrubbing...... :)
 

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DukeDesmo said:
Here in England we have a lot of 'Roundabouts' which many use for knee-down practice ;) couple that with the fact that most roads have a camber running off to the side and that generally speaking on many of the hedge-lined country roads there is better forward visibility through right-hand curves than left (allowing faster safe cornering) means that, for many, the right side of the tyre tends to wear faster/further than the left (we ride on the left side of the road), presumably in the US, although I believe roundabouts are a rarity, the opposite applies?

What I need to find is a 'deserted' roundabout for left side scrubbing...... :)
DukeDesmo,

If not for your propensity to ride around on roundabouts, I think your experience would have proved the theory that it is the road condition, not the natural tendency for riders to prefer left turns. Unless.... what way does the water in your toilet bowl swirl when you flush over there? ;)
 

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NCRick said:
what way does the water in your toilet bowl swirl when you flush over there? ;)
NCRick, Flush is standard Northern Hemisphere style ;) but yes it's those damned roundabouts that make proving the theory difficult - I mean when you find a good big one that's not too busy and suddenly you've got a constant radius bend that you can ride indefinately or at least until you get dizzy, or the 'man' moves you along, (something about it being an offence if you do more than 3 laps ;) ) then it would be rude not to do at least a couple of laps more than neccessary, however it can be somewhat dangerous to do it in the opposite direction...... but then that's why they invented the day-trip to France :)
 

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Normal?

Wanted to attach images from the front tire (tyre) of my '99 SS750. I have BT-010's on the front and BT-020's on the rear. Does this type of wear seem normal and within the range of lean preferences, or is there an indication of suspension or tire or alignment problems? I live in the US, and it is not road crown wearing since I would expect to see the opposite wear pattern, i.e. more on the driver-side left than on the right.
 

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My SS, which has about 1000 miles of aggressive mountain road riding, has about 1/2" strips on both sides of both tires

My 748, on the other hand, which has quite a bit of track day duty, has balled-up rubber on both tires across the full tire widths.
 

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I've heard many reasons for this "phenomenon" but I did also notice that after returning from the UK, that I had fairly even wear across my rear tire and no chicken strips what so ever on my fronts. This is not the case now, nor was it after I got back from the UK. I noticed (due to a friend pointing it out) that I cornered harder or leaned more on left hand turns versus rights so the left side of my tires bore no chicken strips. The right side though had about a 1/4 inch chicken strips. I figured that the reason for this is that the throttle is on the right. This being the case, it's harder to roll on the throttle in a right hand turn over a left hander. Being that my technique is to finish off my turns with the throttle it stands to reason that I'm not able to get on the gas as early on a right hander. Why this was different in the UK over the US I can't say for certain other than to say that round abouts are more plentiful and they go clockwise versus the ones in the US (what few there are) that go counter clockwise (anti-clockwise for our UK friends) giving us more wear on the left side of our tires than the right.........sean
 

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Ay, chihuahua

Onyx, I'd worry less about uneven chicken strips and more about your tire condition, they're trashed...
 
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