Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Gents I need help. This is my first motorcycle and of course I’m drawn to the fine percusión and burst y of Italian engineering. However I’m undecided on the year. What is the difference between a 2013 Multistrada 1200S touring & a 2016 Multistrada 1200S Touring???
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Moar fine percusión and burst y'ness.

Sorry, couldn't help myself. If this is your first one then go cheap and ride the piss out of it to see what you like and don't like.
 

·
Registered
'02 ST4S
Joined
·
1,272 Posts
Either choice is a lot of bike for a first motorcycle. Gotta learn to walk before you run...just sayin'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
If you do this, you'll probably later come to realize that picking such a large and powerful motorcycle as your first bike was a mistake. You'll have a harder time learning some of the finer points of control on a larger bike. The best riders usually started out on little dirt bikes, that's not a coincidence. I'm also speaking from experience. I learned to ride on a little bike, then very quickly jumped to a big one. I had fun, I loved it. It was still a mistake, because that big machine taught me some bad habits, and I didn't realize it until I went back to the small stuff.

Just something to think about.

To answer your question there are far too many technical differences between those two motorcycles to cover in a forum post. 2015 was a platform change year for the Multistrada, they share no major parts with the 2014 and earlier bikes, and among the changes was a variable valve timing engine (DVT). Very broadly speaking, the pre-DVT bikes have a more sporting character, while the DVT machines lean towards the touring end of things. That's a fine distinction, and largely opinion based, others might not agree. They are both very capable in either capacity, just a matter of focus. 2015+ has more advanced electronic rider aids, and an improved version of the semi-active suspension system both bikes have.

Personally, I would not buy a pre-2015 "S" bike, I would wait and fine a well sorted Pikes Peak. The early years of the skyhook suspension were problematic for quite a few owners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Gents I need help. This is my first motorcycle and of course I’m drawn to the fine percusión and burst y of Italian engineering. However I’m undecided on the year. What is the difference between a 2013 Multistrada 1200S touring & a 2016 Multistrada 1200S Touring???
I totally agree flynnmoon.
try to walk at first.than you can try to run later.
MTS is not a bike to start for riding!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
You can easily get killed with either of those bikes. Go for a smaller capacity one, ride a couple of years and then switch to a Multi. That's what I did (Versys 650 being my previous and first bike) and I never regretted my decision. Now that I have more or less learned my '11 Multi, it's clearer than ever to me that I made the right move.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
If you really need the touring capability for your first motorcycle maybe consider a first gen Multistrada or Multi 620? SUPER cheap these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
Im with the guys above, start with something smaller and lighter, do a 2 year apprenticeship. The Multi is heavy, its heavy to move around, and its not the best in traffic. Something like a KTM 690, nimble light and reliable, then get your 2016 Multi. Good luck and safe riding.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,760 Posts
So if you have the self-control to stay in low power mode for a year or three and you're big enough to flat foot and strong enough to pick it up and push it around safely then I don't think the Multi is a terrible choice. You probably will drop it and damage it at least once or twice so you should also have the cash flow for expensive repairs.

The advantage of a traditional 'starter bike' is that you buy something inexpensive, lighter, lower power, slower, and easier/cheaper to repair so that learning is easier/less risky and then when you make mistakes they're not as painful (to person or bank account). In a couple years you sell it for the same amount you paid for it.

It also depends on how much baseline skill you have. When I took the motorcycle safety class there were 20 new riders but their skill level varied widely. I'd ridden dirt bikes and mountain bikes for many years so for me it was about dealing with 'the road'... but there were a number of folks who didn't really have the skills for intuitive riding yet. Youtube has a lot of video's of the later folks getting in over their head and really hurting themselves (usually riding over their skill level then off a corner because they panic when they're going in hot and don't have the skill to intuitively lean into it and instead brake and stand it up).

I'd actually recommend taking the MSF class before getting the bike if you can and ask the guys where you're at when you finish - they can give you a more expert opinion than a bunch of people online.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top