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Howdy Folk,

I've read a few previous threads that kind of imply having tyre tubes is not as preferable as having tubeless tyres. If I've read this correct, why is this?

My Paul Smart has Pirelli Phantoms and on the wall is marked - tubeless unless required by rim.
So does the standard PS spoked rim require tubes?

Thanks
Jas
 

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it's the holes for the spokes that make the rims require tubes.

there are a few options though for spoked tubless rims:

alpinas have a special system that allows them to be sealed air tight. they are sexy but not cheap.

the other alternative is some have silicone sealed their spoked rims, making them air tight and allowing their rims to run tubeless. there is some debate as to how frequently these seals fail, though im guessing many on this forum have enough miles on their sealed spoked rims to give solid evidence in favor or against the idea.

finally, you can swap out the spoked rims for a forged (non-spoked) set for the greatest weight savings and improvement to handling.
 

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You can run tubeless tyres with tubes or without.

You can only run tube type tyres with tubes.

SC's run tubes because of the retro styled spoked wheels. Other than looks (and some don't even agree on this point), tubeless is better in all respects - lighter, easier to change, easier to fix punctures, less likely to fail suddenly.

Cheers,

Brett
 

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Master of Bumnitude
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The classically-styled spoked wheels are a compromise made for the sake of appearance. For many of us (but obviously not all) they are part and parcel with the whole sport classic thing.

Are they as good as modern, tubeless, alloy wheels? Nope. Is the compromise worth it? Only you can decide.

Personally If I didn't want 'em I'd have bought a different bike. A Monster perhaps.

Been riding since 1967. I've never had a blow out and had just one flat in all those years. I'm sure that colors my viewpoint.

-don
 

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bshadbolt;859471. . . said:
You can run tubeless tyres with tubes or without.

You can only run tube type tyres with tubes. . .
I'm doing just that - replaced my GT's OEM Michelin Pilot Classics with Pilot Road 2s

I'm ambivalent about the stock wheels - love the classic look but don't love cleaning them. Since I'm not an agressive rider, I think if I ever replace them it'll be because of too much rust\oxidation rather than for performance advantages. Then I'll have to decide whether to go the bargain route and just get some used PS wheels with the aluminum rim, or the not so bargain route - OZ bronze 5 spoke casters that remind me a bit of those on the old Darmahs circa '80.:cool:
 

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I'm doing just that - replaced my GT's OEM Michelin Pilot Classics with Pilot Road 2s

I'm ambivalent about the stock wheels - love the classic look but don't love cleaning them. Since I'm not an agressive rider, I think if I ever replace them it'll be because of too much rust\oxidation rather than for performance advantages. Then I'll have to decide whether to go the bargain route and just get some used PS wheels with the aluminum rim, or the not so bargain route - OZ bronze 5 spoke casters that remind me a bit of those on the old Darmahs circa '80.:cool:
There are many options for wheels - it's only the GT1000's that have heavy chrome rims - my SC1000 and all other models come with ali rims same as PS. If you were in Singapore I could sell you my stock SC wheels - or there are other stock Duc wheels which fit - I'm running ST4 wheels I think.

Cheers,

Brett
 

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There are many options for wheels - it's only the GT1000's that have heavy chrome rims - my SC1000 and all other models come with ali rims same as PS. If you were in Singapore I could sell you my stock SC wheels - or there are other stock Duc wheels which fit - I'm running ST4 wheels I think.

Cheers,

Brett
Thanks Brett - I forgot the SC1000 uses the same wheels as the PS. That works out well for us GT owners since quite a few SC and PS owners upgrade wheels and then sell their OEM wheels, providing a nice upgrade for GT owners at a modest price.
 

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Gone Tubeless

In preparation for attending Reg Pridmore's school on the Streets of Willow at the end of the month, (and because Nicky Hayden didn't draw my ticket at Laguna Seca) I took my wheels and a set of Dunlop Q2s to Ride Wright Wheels in Anaheim, CA last week.
Naturally, the weather has precluded any serious runs on the butt dyno but I can say that the proprietor of Ride Wright, Mr. Sam Wakim is a pleasure to do business with and he sealed my rims for not much more than the price of a pair of tubes.
Anyway, about four pounds of inner tubes are in my garage instead of in my tires and as said before, if you are going to lose weight on your bike, there is no better place than inside the tires.
 
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Careful with these.
I did extensive research and they could never give me a clear answer to the heat tolerance or speed rating of this process.
Plus the goop they use to seal the wheels will add weight and will affect the balance of the wheels greatly.
If one of these wheels do lose a seal it is complete loss of air very quickly.
Someone posted something about this a few years ago and lived to tell about it.
If you ever have to true the rims any movement of the nipples will break the seal. The original intention for the sealing method was created for Harley wheels.
Harley's barley sustain a extended 100 Plus MPH speeds for long periods. The heat and beating a wheel takes at those speeds are not intended for a sealed set of regular spoked wheel in my opinion
After the research and the pro's and cons of this I bought Alpina's
and eventually became their Distributor. I was a customer first.
I am not trying to sell you alpina's I am just a little skeptical with this process as they could never answer my questions about heat and Speed tolerance nor answer any liability issues.

Scary Stuff IMHO
JC


In preparation for attending Reg Pridmore's school on the Streets of Willow at the end of the month, (and because Nicky Hayden didn't draw my ticket at Laguna Seca) I took my wheels and a set of Dunlop Q2s to Ride Wright Wheels in Anaheim, CA last week.
Naturally, the weather has precluded any serious runs on the butt dyno but I can say that the proprietor of Ride Wright, Mr. Sam Wakim is a pleasure to do business with and he sealed my rims for not much more than the price of a pair of tubes.
Anyway, about four pounds of inner tubes are in my garage instead of in my tires and as said before, if you are going to lose weight on your bike, there is no better place than inside the tires.
 

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Careful with these.
I did extensive research and they could never give me a clear answer to the heat tolerance or speed rating of this process.
Plus the goop they use to seal the wheels will add weight and will affect the balance of the wheels greatly.
If one of these wheels do lose a seal it is complete loss of air very quickly.
Someone posted something about this a few years ago and lived to tell about it.
If you ever have to true the rims any movement of the nipples will break the seal. The original intention for the sealing method was created for Harley wheels.
Harley's barley sustain a extended 100 Plus MPH speeds for long periods. The heat and beating a wheel takes at those speeds are not intended for a sealed set of regular spoked wheel in my opinion
After the research and the pro's and cons of this I bought Alpina's
and eventually became their Distributor. I was a customer first.
I am not trying to sell you alpina's I am just a little skeptical with this process as they could never answer my questions about heat and Speed tolerance nor answer any liability issues.

Scary Stuff IMHO
JC
Wow, how to respond?
Forums seem to be quite often posted upon by illiterate insomniacs who would do the rest of us a favor by sticking to surfing porn. I am not suggesting that you are one of those. But to say that because a company that sells wheels in Garden Grove got an F on their report card means that the product of a company in Anaheim is scary? If you are going to assess a risk, you need more than dark, disturbing doubts. You need to look at not only the severity of consequence, (totally agree, flat tire at speed bad), but at the likelihood of occurrence. Looking at your laundry list of reasons against sealing spoke wheels, it is essentially the same as you posted a year ago (and about two years ago). This suggests a lack of research. You argue using, “they, goop, someone,” and, “in my opinion”. Where are your facts? If you’ve ever watched an eight hundred pound bagger grinding off their floorboards on the PCH, you wouldn’t honestly suggest that Harley wheels can’t have a stressful life. As an example of actual “extensive research”, Dietrichpfeifer has posted very well reasoned descriptions of problems as well as documented what has and hasn’t worked when he has tested solutions. He has not only educated and entertained us, he has so far survived to post 2,250 times with way more fun than profit. GTRossi has also had good results with sealing his rims. OBTW, Silicone glue has a continuous service temperature rating of 400 degrees F. Read that off the tube, I did.
 
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I guess it is a difference of opinion

And "if" you sell your bike with these wheels on them, please tell the buyer.
It would be the responsible thing to do

Alpina's are DOT and TUV approved.

Have a nice one


JC





Wow, how to respond?
Forums seem to be quite often posted upon by illiterate insomniacs who would do the rest of us a favor by sticking to surfing porn. I am not suggesting that you are one of those. But to say that because a company that sells wheels in Garden Grove got an F on their report card means that the product of a company in Anaheim is scary? If you are going to assess a risk, you need more than dark, disturbing doubts. You need to look at not only the severity of consequence, (totally agree, flat tire at speed bad), but at the likelihood of occurrence. Looking at your laundry list of reasons against sealing spoke wheels, it is essentially the same as you posted a year ago (and about two years ago). This suggests a lack of research. You argue using, “they, goop, someone,” and, “in my opinion”. Where are your facts? If you’ve ever watched an eight hundred pound bagger grinding off their floorboards on the PCH, you wouldn’t honestly suggest that Harley wheels can’t have a stressful life. As an example of actual “extensive research”, Dietrichpfeifer has posted very well reasoned descriptions of problems as well as documented what has and hasn’t worked when he has tested solutions. He has not only educated and entertained us, he has so far survived to post 2,250 times with way more fun than profit. GTRossi has also had good results with sealing his rims. OBTW, Silicone glue has a continuous service temperature rating of 400 degrees F. Read that off the tube, I did.
 

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it's about the weight!!!!! I installed some Carrozzeria rims and the weight savings and its impact on the handling was fantastic. Big improvement.

Oh, I have had several flats with tubes back in the '80's - scared the shit out of me every time and twice damn near sent me sliding down the road. And that was back when sport tires were about as crappy as the stock Phantoms Ducati put on these bikes.

I did not realise these bikes had tubes when I bought mine. Pissed me off when I found out because I have personal experience with how dangerous they can be.....
 

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FYI, finding tubes in our size is getting harder. I just had to replace mine on my GT1000 and it was a bit of an ordeal. Looking to seal up my rims on my PS1000.
 

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it's about the weight!!!!! I installed some Carrozzeria rims and the weight savings and its impact on the handling was fantastic. Big improvement.

Oh, I have had several flats with tubes back in the '80's - scared the shit out of me every time and twice damn near sent me sliding down the road. And that was back when sport tires were about as crappy as the stock Phantoms Ducati put on these bikes.

I did not realise these bikes had tubes when I bought mine. Pissed me off when I found out because I have personal experience with how dangerous they can be.....
I put Oz Racing wheels on mine and the difference in handling was astounding
 

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I’m going to seal the wire wheels on my ‘77 Triumph Bonneville at the next tire change. I haven’t read about any catastrophic failures, just a couple of slow leaks that required re sealing. I was actually ready to do this myself when I started hearing about it being done successfully. So now the experimenting has been done for me. Tubes are a major pain in the ass. I’m willing to risk having to reseal a wheel after spoke maintenance. Anyone contemplating sealing spoke wheels should make sure the wheels are true and the spokes are tight before sealing.
 

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Picked up a nail in the middle of nowhere 400 miles from home back in 2009 -- still had the stock wheels + inner tubes at that time. I'll refrain from a bunch of foul language here and simply say it was an incredibly painful ordeal.

"Never again" was my conclusion. Made an investment in Alpinas and carry a BestRest cycle pump + tire plug kit with me at all times.
 

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I picked up a nail in my FRONT tire back in 1972 on I-5; that thing went flat so fast you wouldn't believe it. If I'd been in the mountains: forget it, I probably wouldn't be here.

Sealing wire wheels seems like the smart choice if you're not doing solid wheels. 3M Sealing tape. I love my OZ wheels!
 
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