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So I recieved this from a buddy who rides a Tuono Factory. Its from an Aprilia forum, of course.

I have not verified this or even seen the article but I know MCN was one of the few magazines that wasn't too keen on the Streetfighter. If this is really from a bonified article its pretty hilarious. Of course it is MCN, the National Enquirer of moto mags.

"My dealer just sent me this email. Great news, good to see how well the Tuono is still holding up to the new blood.

September Issue of Motorcycle Consumer News.

Aprilia beats Ducati...AGAIN!



The new Ducati Streetfighter S is drawing a lot of attention this summer as Ducati North America promotes it as the latest and greatest naked sportbike. And it is indeed a striking motorcycle.



But, hold on!



The editors of the Motorcycle Consumer News just tested the Ducati Streetfighter S against Europe's best naked sportbikes including the Aprilia Tuono Factory.



So how did the Tuono stack up against the new Ducati in the following categories:



Suspension: Tuono (Their exactly the same)

Brakes: Streetfighter (Very true)

Handling: Tuono (Seriously? Where?)
Engine: Streetfighter (Didn't the editor say below that they preferred the Tuono engine???? And did they not experience the same low end problems we are?????? This just proves how off this article is! Power is of course no contest.)

Ergonomics: Streefighter (Seriously??? If there's one thing the Tuono wins it should be this!)

Riding Impression: Tuono (What the heck does this even mean? Is this not covered by one of the other categories??? Hilarious!)
Instruments and Controls: Tuono (Could go either way, subjective..Duc shows way more info)
Attention to Detail: Tuono (Uh I might give it this one.....maybe)
Value: Tuono (Well are we talking Retail price. If so, NOT! Only 1K seperating retail price......Current pricing, yes)


Overall: aprilia Tuono Factory



While the Streetfighter did have a more powerful engine, it was the Tuono's outstanding balance of power, torque, suspension, braking and handling that elevates it above the new kid on the block." Elevates it for what? Street? Track? Touring?



Editors Comments:

"It's one heck of a canyon carver, with plenty of torque and power on tap". LT Snyder
"The Tuono has a superb engine with tremendous top end and excellent fuel injection that's very smooth and tractable. The handling is very intuitive, it's a scalpel in the twisties." Don Searle
The Aprilia, an awesome-sounding V-twin with a wide powerband, premium suspension, and it handles like its on rails. It's the track bike I'd want in my garage..."

I really don't care at all, I just thought I'd play devils advocate! These articles are so stupid! There both awesome machines in their own right. I've ridden the Tuono Factory several times and really enjoyed it but for me its too big and I love the look of the Ducati. To each their own! This is a good example of why not to care what these magazines say. Buy what you love.
 

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I got my copy of MCN today and that was the first article I read. I enjoy reading these types of articles, but most of the time I take what they have to say with a grain of salt as I keep in mind that the majority of the article is simply opinion. They do however frequently contain quite a bit of useful information. I could've been emotionally crushed a year or so ago when a magazine did a shootout between the Yamaha FJR and the BMW K12GT, with the Yamaha besting the BMW according to the authors. I've owned both of these motorcycles and I much prefer the BMW. Which brings me to my point. To each his own.

One thing I did agree with in the MCN article was the awkward foot positioning on the right footpeg of the Ducati due to the exhaust heat shield is rather annoying.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I got my copy of MCN today and that was the first article I read. I enjoy reading these types of articles, but most of the time I take what they have to say with a grain of salt as I keep in mind that the majority of the article is simply opinion. They do however frequently contain quite a bit of useful information. I could've been emotionally crushed a year or so ago when a magazine did a shootout between the Yamaha FJR and the BMW K12GT, with the Yamaha besting the BMW according to the authors. I've owned both of these motorcycles and I much prefer the BMW. Which brings me to my point. To each his own.

One thing I did agree with in the MCN article was the awkward foot positioning on the right footpeg of the Ducati due to the exhaust heat shield is rather annoying.

Mike
I agree. I put spacers on my right footpeg assembly yesterday to address that problem.
 

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So I recieved this from a buddy who rides a Tuono Factory. Its from an Aprilia forum, of course.

I have not verified this or even seen the article but I know MCN was one of the few magazines that wasn't too keen on the Streetfighter. If this is really from a bonified article its pretty hilarious. Of course it is MCN, the National Enquirer of moto mags.

"My dealer just sent me this email. Great news, good to see how well the Tuono is still holding up to the new blood.

September Issue of Motorcycle Consumer News.

Aprilia beats Ducati...AGAIN!



The new Ducati Streetfighter S is drawing a lot of attention this summer as Ducati North America promotes it as the latest and greatest naked sportbike. And it is indeed a striking motorcycle.



But, hold on!



The editors of the Motorcycle Consumer News just tested the Ducati Streetfighter S against Europe's best naked sportbikes including the Aprilia Tuono Factory.



So how did the Tuono stack up against the new Ducati in the following categories:



Suspension: Tuono (Their exactly the same)

Brakes: Streetfighter (Very true)

Handling: Tuono (Seriously? Where?)
Engine: Streetfighter (Didn't the editor say below that they preferred the Tuono engine???? And did they not experience the same low end problems we are?????? This just proves how off this article is! Power is of course no contest.)

Ergonomics: Streefighter (Seriously??? If there's one thing the Tuono wins it should be this!)

Riding Impression: Tuono (What the heck does this even mean? Is this not covered by one of the other categories??? Hilarious!)
Instruments and Controls: Tuono (Could go either way, subjective..Duc shows way more info)
Attention to Detail: Tuono (Uh I might give it this one.....maybe)
Value: Tuono (Well are we talking Retail price. If so, NOT! Only 1K seperating retail price......Current pricing, yes)


Overall: aprilia Tuono Factory



While the Streetfighter did have a more powerful engine, it was the Tuono's outstanding balance of power, torque, suspension, braking and handling that elevates it above the new kid on the block." Elevates it for what? Street? Track? Touring?



Editors Comments:

"It's one heck of a canyon carver, with plenty of torque and power on tap". LT Snyder
"The Tuono has a superb engine with tremendous top end and excellent fuel injection that's very smooth and tractable. The handling is very intuitive, it's a scalpel in the twisties." Don Searle
The Aprilia, an awesome-sounding V-twin with a wide powerband, premium suspension, and it handles like its on rails. It's the track bike I'd want in my garage..."

I really don't care at all, I just thought I'd play devils advocate! These articles are so stupid! There both awesome machines in their own right. I've ridden the Tuono Factory several times and really enjoyed it but for me its too big and I love the look of the Ducati. To each their own! This is a good example of why not to care what these magazines say. Buy what you love.

Agree with you an yes I recall they had lots of fueling issues with the Rotex engine in the Aprilla and it took them awhile to get it sorted out. The bikes would stall at traffic lights all the time. I test rode a factory a few years ago and thats what it did to me several times which is one of the reasons I did not buy it.
 

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My 00 rsv wasnt' so bad on the fueling, and the early aprilias had dual mapping so you could cut one wire take the restrictor out of the exhaust and airbox and go to the euro mapping which eliminated the massive flat spot at low rpm. My 04 was unrideable and stayed in the garage till the simple solution of a pipe and chip eliminated the problem for the most part.

Chris

Agree with you an yes I recall they had lots of fueling issues with the Rotex engine in the Aprilla and it took them awhile to get it sorted out. The bikes would stall at traffic lights all the time. I test rode a factory a few years ago and thats what it did to me several times which is one of the reasons I did not buy it.
 

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My 00 rsv wasnt' so bad on the fueling, and the early aprilias had dual mapping so you could cut one wire take the restrictor out of the exhaust and airbox and go to the euro mapping which eliminated the massive flat spot at low rpm. My 04 was unrideable and stayed in the garage till the simple solution of a pipe and chip eliminated the problem for the most part.

Here's an interesting writeup on the aprilia forum:

http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185392

Chris

Agree with you an yes I recall they had lots of fueling issues with the Rotex engine in the Aprilla and it took them awhile to get it sorted out. The bikes would stall at traffic lights all the time. I test rode a factory a few years ago and thats what it did to me several times which is one of the reasons I did not buy it.
 

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The biggest reason I love Ducati's bikes is the light weight!
The Tuono is just too heavy to compete with the Streetfighter.
And that leads to the same OVERALL conclusion MCN came to: Super Duke (over SF, Tuono and Speed Triple) .....Not to be a troll or anything. I am just a former Ducasti (Monster S4) who while (finally) coming to love my SD R (had to sort harshness out of suspension/wicked horrible fueling--you have no idea how wicked), like the SF--easy enough..... I am secretley planning to own a Duc again someday--So off to Gingerman today to demo ride some! Adios!
 

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I was disappointed in the SuperDuke. All the reviews implied it was such a badass bike. The one I rode in the GA mountains was a lovely bike a real pussy cat, with a lovely, snatch free bottom end, but not a patch on my Monster S4Rs as an overall performance tool and for excitement
 

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Well remember, the Tuono/RSV is of course heavier (and really not all that much though) because it is a 5 year old design now.. but still amazing motorcycles. I love the engine characteristics of the Rotax twin in the Aprilia (old and new versions).

Just wait until next year when Aprilia gives a run for the money with the new V4-Tuono and RSV4.
 

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Just wait until next year when Aprilia gives a run for the money with the new V4-Tuono and RSV4.
And you don't think that Ducati will have a 1198 engine on the SF by then?
 

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And you don't think that Ducati will have a 1198 engine on the SF by then?
i'm counting on that. i took one look at the SF and saw that it was an obligatory money pit. having done all that with my monster, i don't have the stomach for it.

just want to buy and ride. with a new model, maybe i can snatch up a sweetly tricked up SF with it's "little" motor :D
 

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I was disappointed in the SuperDuke. All the reviews implied it was such a badass bike. The one I rode in the GA mountains was a lovely bike a real pussy cat, with a lovely, snatch free bottom end, but not a patch on my Monster S4Rs as an overall performance tool and for excitement
Agreed: The SD I owned was a sweet, fun, lively bike. The SDR is evil--more comparable to S4Rs--with both capable of 130+ RWHP when tuned. I have been eyeing the "old" Monsters with new appreciation lately. I am sick......
 

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I just finished reading the MCN article, and also have the perspective of having both an SD and an SFS. While I think the SD is just as great a bike as they depict in the article, even better with a set of Akrapovic slipons and a factory ECU remap that markedly improves low speed fueling, the MCN guys apparently had some big problems with the rear suspension of the SFS, and allowed that to affect their entire view of the bike. I find the suspension of the SFS almost perfect, although a little on the firm side at the rear, in the stock settings. I'm a big guy, about 270#, so the spring rate feels much softer for me than for a usual size rider. MCN ended up with some bizarre settings in their attempts to modify the shock settings, taking out all preload, and all rebound damping, then complaining about the handling. Wow.
I think MCN somehow set out to find fault with the SFS, perhaps because of its price, or some other bias, and ended up criticizing it for silly things, like the position of the instrument cluster (low, according to MCN).
I think this review really tells you less about the differences between the SD and the SFS than most of the comparisons written about the bikes on this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I just finished reading the MCN article, and also have the perspective of having both an SD and an SFS. While I think the SD is just as great a bike as they depict in the article, even better with a set of Akrapovic slipons and a factory ECU remap that markedly improves low speed fueling, the MCN guys apparently had some big problems with the rear suspension of the SFS, and allowed that to affect their entire view of the bike. I find the suspension of the SFS almost perfect, although a little on the firm side at the rear, in the stock settings. I'm a big guy, about 270#, so the spring rate feels much softer for me than for a usual size rider. MCN ended up with some bizarre settings in their attempts to modify the shock settings, taking out all preload, and all rebound damping, then complaining about the handling. Wow.
I think MCN somehow set out to find fault with the SFS, perhaps because of its price, or some other bias, and ended up criticizing it for silly things, like the position of the instrument cluster (low, according to MCN).
I think this review really tells you less about the differences between the SD and the SFS than most of the comparisons written about the bikes on this forum.
Did you read this online, I can't seem to find it?
 

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I'm a print subscriber. The article just came out in print, won't be online for a while, if ever. It is the September issue.
 

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Can you educate me about why you consider MCN the "gutter press" of motorcycling? I see them as flawed, but potentially useful because they don't take advertising from the manufacturers. Is there something else I'm missing, or some history of which I am not aware?
Thanks
 

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Yeah, I wouldn't really call MCN the gutter press. (Although perhaps you were thinking of the UK mag?) Motorcycle Consumer News is kind of like a moto version of Consumer Reports. Kind of staid, and probably the only moto mag that doesn't obsess over lap times and track performance. They generally report more real-world useful stuff, like maintenance costs, MPG, etc.

But this comparison struck me as odd too. To have the Ducati come out lowest on handling just doesn't make sense. It was the handling that sold me on the bike. Plus the suspension adjustments they made seemed, well, bizarre.

One interesting point, buried in the article, was that when asked which bike they'd want for themselves, the testers unanimously chose the Streetfighter. So go figure...
 

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I had not read the article, but I agree that the rear suspension was way off. Until I backed off the preload, I got no sag at all, then when I brought the bike in for a check, the compression on the rear shock was set to full hard... I had not bought the ball head allen wrench set yet. The stock rear spring is way to stiff to my liking, but what sort of gets me riled is the press release a few months back on how Ohlins is training all the dealers to set up the bikes. I did not experience any set up for me personally. Loaded it up, trailered it home, then I set it up best I could. For me, if I were selling such a high dollar bike, I would make optional springs available for the one time setup. This "one bike fits all" mentality may play well when spending $6k, but for $20k, I think I want my bum wiped as well as my bike set up proper.
 
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