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Is your bike stock, or, what other mods have your done?
If it is stock, then keep the tubes in the tyres.

If your bike is stock, and you are looking at mods for it, then spend your money on forks and exhaust first.

(just my opinion);)
 

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So what normaly happens with these then, what do you guys do with these ?

Get rid of 'em.

There's no good reason to run tubed tires on a streetbike in this day and age, other than the fact that Ducati was too cheap to fit these bikes with proper tubeless wheels, which is not really a good reason anyway.

Buy some Carrozzerias or some other alloys off another Duc model that will fit. Or, if you have to have the spoker look you can get tubeless Alpinas for $$$$. Personally, I wouldn't bother with cheap fixes to try to make your stock spokers air tight and tubeless -- my neck is worth more than whatever perceived savings in cash from using the "tubeless kits."

Lighter wheels (i.e. without tubes) are less prone to tankslappers than the stock wheels. Plus, if you get a flat with tubes, you're gonna need a truck to haul it away and may be SOL if you're stuck out in the boonies.

Then you get yourself a proper (adjustable) suspension like Ohlins or Showas off another Duc model.
 

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Is your bike stock, or, what other mods have your done?
If it is stock, then keep the tubes in the tyres.

If your bike is stock, and you are looking at mods for it, then spend your money on forks and exhaust first.

(just my opinion);)
To me, it's a toss up whether you go with tubeless wheels/tires or change the suspension first. Both are terrible in stock form, so you should take care of both problems at the same time.

If you have a blowout at speed with the tubes, you're in serious trouble and the stock suspension is just plain dangerous unless (maybe) you weigh 150 lbs. or less. I changed both at the same time and ended up with a great handling bike. Also added a Speedy Moto billet triple clamp with tapered bearings that also extended the wheelbase a bit.

If you put on a performance exhaust without addressing the serious wheel and suspension issues, you're just going to get into trouble that much quicker.

Oh, yeah, and the stock "retro" tires are horrible, too, so that's another change. I'm having good luck with Dunlop Qualifiers.
 

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go for the Carrozzeria's and while you're at it get some decent rubber. The stock Pirellis are crap.
 

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People always throw up the blowout scenario... why would tubes increase the risk considering they are encased in a steel belted tyre?

The real issue is being stranded a long way from home with a flat.
Tubeless means you plug the flat and carry on your way.

If you can live with that risk, no need to change unless you're after maximum handling performance.
 

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People always throw up the blowout scenario... why would tubes increase the risk considering they are encased in a steel belted tyre?

The real issue is being stranded a long way from home with a flat.
Tubeless means you plug the flat and carry on your way.

If you can live with that risk, no need to change unless you're after maximum handling performance.
I am riding tubed tyres since 1990… on various bikes…

In all those years i only had one flat in the rear due to a large nail picked up near a building site, so i don't really care about this issue.

In a tubed tyre you can use a repair spray too, unless you have a cut in the tube.

Concerning the safety of tubeless kits, i must say that some friends of mine use them in classic bike racing and never had a problem…
 

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The tubeless kits didn't work

Sadly those tubeless kits didn't work and the volume of goo needed to seal them up would negate the weight saving.

I guess the bottom line....if you want the ultimate...buy some BST c/f wheels....anything less is the compromise your happy with.

I am happy with the excels on my GT....no big breakthrough...and I will always be on the lookout for an upgrade.

I have never had a flat tyre/tire ( depending on where you live) on a bike....and my motoring association ( RACQ ULTRA CARE ) will pick my bike up and if i am more than 150klms from home give me a hire car/ fly me home/pay for a motel/ arrange a grid girl to be in the said motel...all as part of the annual fee of $150 odd.

Ok........maybe I am a little unsure of the exact benefits....but I am positive I read something about a grid girl! :D

Cheers Roger
 

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People always throw up the blowout scenario... why would tubes increase the risk considering they are encased in a steel belted tyre?

The real issue is being stranded a long way from home with a flat.
Tubeless means you plug the flat and carry on your way.

If you can live with that risk, no need to change unless you're after maximum handling performance.
You SHOULD be after maximum handling performance, unless you don't think your neck is worth it.

With a tube, if you get a tear, all the air rushes out the spokes at one time causing immediate deflation, which can be a big problem at speed. Also, from what I've heard, which sounds plausible to me, the tube causes friction and heat within the tire that makes the possibility of a tear in the tube and a blowout more possible. A blowout with tubes may be a "remote" possibility (unless it actually happens to you) but I don't think you want to crash and spend months in the hospital because of these known problems just to prove to yourself that these problems exist. There is a good reason why 99.9% of the sportbikes made today run alloy, tubeless wheels, the exception being the Ducati Sport Classics and maybe the Triumph Thruxton.

Also, the headshake associated with the heavy stock spoked wheels and tubes is not acceptable to me. Again, that can be a big problem at speed.

Bottom line is that tubeless wheels, along with better than stock tires, are a BIG improvement over the stock set up. Upgrade the suspension and brakes and you'll have a really fun, nice handling bike.

The heavy stock spoke wheels and tubes and retro tires are a distinct disadvantage compared to lighter tubeless wheels and performance tires -- unless your priority is authentic "retro" looks and performance.
 
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