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Discussion Starter #1
Have a bit of money left to spend before child #1 arrives.

1) Mag wheels

or

2) Offset triples (preferably 25mm) along with punching out the 996 to a 1038 via 100mm bore.

Opinions? It's track only for this bike and I won't be purchasing something new for at least a year and when I do it will probably be a bunch of new crud for this bike or an XX98.
 

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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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Tires. And a camera to get lots of pictures of that baby. :D
 

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I'll say this....I purchased a set of Marchesini forged street Kompe wheels for my 999. Along w/ the wheels I installed new Michelin Pilot Pures, the tires that weighs less than all others? By this time I just got my 999 back from FBF after they installed a BCM 1038cc overbore kit, S spec cams, porting, valve work...light weight cam belt pulleys. IF I had it to do all over again I would of dumped the $2100 I spent on the wheels into the motor. I would have had the cases split, balanced the crank, etc....make it bullet proof as I could get it. The wheels are very nice but after a while you don't notice or get accustom to the lighter weight. IMO the performance diff between my cast aluminum OEMs and forged were minimum. Maybe for a track only bike it would be more noticeable, but on the street...No. However that extra ponies are always felt and what a great performance upgrade! Plus the extra HP does not over stress the engine....as luck or bad luck would have it, I ended up with a bad main bearing approx 3500 miles later so I ended up doing the balancing along w/ all new bearing throughout....
 

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I put light weight wheels on all my bikes. I hate swapping bikes with my friends that have stock wheels...

-M
 

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Mayor of Simpleton
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The wheels are very nice but after a while you don't notice or get accustom to the lighter weight.
Yes, and then you ride another bike with stock wheels and are shocked all over again.

Go for light wheels, sticky tires, and suspension. If there's money left, get a good tune--cam timing and mapping. Forget offset triples unless you have the longer swingarm, and you don't need the long swingarm until you get to about 120hp.
 

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Yes, and then you ride another bike with stock wheels and are shocked all over again.

Go for light wheels, sticky tires, and suspension. If there's money left, get a good tune--cam timing and mapping. Forget offset triples unless you have the longer swingarm, and you don't need the long swingarm until you get to about 120hp.
I would say that you would notice the change...
I'm thinking 999, the OP has a different motor. Not sure how they hold up to bore increases. I understand that some of the casing needs to be shaved?
I think, given my situation where I do all my riding on the street, light weight wheels seemed like such a waste of cash. If the bore kit didn't really do much for performance then maybe it's a toss up. But the bore kit, S cams, porting, HC Pistals really bumped up performance. It's basically a Ducati Corse "power up" kit but with larger bores.
If he can find a good tech to do the over bore kit right, he would really enjoy it every time he opens the throttle...the wheels are really cool but you get used to them. It is a tough decision..
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would say that you would notice the change...
I'm thinking 999, the OP has a different motor. Not sure how they hold up to bore increases. I understand that some of the casing needs to be shaved?
I think, given my situation where I do all my riding on the street, light weight wheels seemed like such a waste of cash. If the bore kit didn't really do much for performance then maybe it's a toss up. But the bore kit, S cams, porting, HC Pistals really bumped up performance. It's basically a Ducati Corse "power up" kit but with larger bores.
If he can find a good tech to do the over bore kit right, he would really enjoy it every time he opens the throttle...the wheels are really cool but you get used to them. It is a tough decision..
There is no way I will dump much money into a 996 engine. I will eventually put an XX98 engine in it and as other have pointed out I will need a mag arm for the power. Even if I put a 999S engine in I would need the mag arm.

I need to get rid of the 3-spokes and was leaning on wheel for that, handling, and better braking.

I can get 999 pistons any time for $150 or less, cometic gaskets for $85, and a friend that can sleeve the cylinders properly at $200 for both. (material costs only) $440 is not much at all and since offset triples are "useless" to me right now I will go with the mag wheels. Then in April I'll do the big bore and have it mapped shortly there after.

Thanks for the in put, men.

And a camera to get lots of pictures of that baby. :D
Acquired the Nikon 1 J3 a month ago.
 

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Mayor of Simpleton
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There's only so much left to get with a 996 though. There's only about 40 more cc and then you have to stroke it. You can do cams, but even then eventually your going to run into the limit of the standard cases.

Just because you take something (light wheels) for granted doesnt make it less effective--especially on the track. If you haven't already; get a shock, revalve/respring the forks, sticky up the rubber and go.
 

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More power in your engine only makes you accelerate faster.

Wouldn't you prefer something which helps you turn better, accelerate faster, brake easier, load your suspension less, as well as look better? Then you want wheels, not engine mods
 

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Wheels!

But a bit extra umph is never a bad thing :D
WOW!.....I'm shocked, you build engines to excess, I would have thought engine kit all the way w/ you.
You get used to the wheels, yes there's no doubt if you were to take off your light weight forged wheels and put your old cast ones back on you would feel a difference. Conversely you'll always feel that extra punch at the throttle which is loads of fun.....
 

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"Adding power makes you faster on the straights. Subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere."

Colin Chapman, Founder, Lotus Engineering Ltd
 

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I'll also go with the wheels, I've upgraded just about everything on my bike and the biggest single improvement was lighter wheels...
 

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"Adding power makes you faster on the straights. Subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere."

Colin Chapman, Founder, Lotus Engineering Ltd
Then do both :) Sorry couldnt resist.
On this topic it always comes out like you have to choose one over the other.
You DONT, you can have a light bike and loads of power.

Agree though that light wheels will transform the bike, so its #1.
 

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Then do both :) Sorry couldnt resist.
On this topic it always comes out like you have to choose one over the other.
You DONT, you can have a light bike and loads of power.

Agree though that light wheels will transform the bike, so its #1.
I find the power from the mill in my R to be more than enough, and beyond that, I love the "way" that it makes that power. The more high strung, "revvy" nature of the smaller desmoquattro suits me fine given my riding background. The combination of the stock plant, induction system, 50mm Termi's and Factory Pro chip result in an engine which is just about perfect to me.

So, that leaves removing weight/rotating mass (and improving braking) as the strategy I have taken for upgrades over this winter. Have swapped out a ton of stock plastic for Ducati Performance and Shift Tech CF. Also, just picked up a pair of Marchesini 5 spoke mags. Am now looking into rotor upgrades, e.g., BrakeTech Axis Iron, and am doing some preliminary analysis into the resultant stresses on the rotor hub mounts in a stock versus spacer setup. Some members of the forum have expressed concerns about the use of the spacers, so I decided some empirical (albeit virtual) testing was in order. Am still trying to figure out how to use the stock speedometer drive with a spacer setup, and am thinking that a "transfer collar" that I am working on may be the answer to getting the stock drive unit to clear the rotor hub mounting hardware.
 

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"Adding power makes you faster on the straights. Subtracting weight makes you faster everywhere."

Colin Chapman, Founder, Lotus Engineering Ltd
Chapman had a reputation for making things TOO light on the F1 cars, often resulting in broken parts. Just sayin'.
 

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Chapman had a reputation for making things TOO light on the F1 cars, often resulting in broken parts. Just sayin'.
True, but that was the nature of engineering progress during that time period, due in part to a poor understanding and methodology for calculating factors of safety. Also, lacking the design, analysis, prototyping and manufacturing tools we have at our disposal today changes were often implemented that were not tested extensively.
 

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True, but that was the nature of engineering progress during that time period, due in part to a poor understanding and methodology for calculating factors of safety. Also, lacking the design, analysis, prototyping and manufacturing tools we have at our disposal today changes were often implemented that were not tested extensively.
Even with all that, experience and good common sense are important. I worked with engineers that had all of those available, and often I could improve on their design.
 
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