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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I am wondering if anyone has experience transferring the warranty from one owner to the next.

One of my friends is selling his 05 749 Dark to my OTHER friend. I am trying to help out a bit and find the information on transferring the warranty over to the new owner.

Any relevant help is greatly appreciated.

Cheers!
 

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You really don't have to do a darn thing, the dealer computers will show the date the bike was sold originally and the miles on the bike will be obvious.
 

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I did it.

I bought my bike with 21 months left on the warranty.
Dealers gave me no problems with the transfer.

They were happy the bike would be ridden!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys, my dealer was closed yesterday hence the post but they got back to me today and verified, that the warranties are fully transferable and there is no cost at all so its full speed ahead!

Thanks again!
 

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Is it just the regular factory warranty? In that case, you've got your answer...

Otherwise, if it is an extended warranty, there is some paperwork to be done, and a minimal transfer fee to be paid. Call the vendor of the extended warranty on the procedure.
 

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Some closing warranty remarks

KRG said:
Hello,

I am wondering if anyone has experience transferring the warranty from one owner to the next.

One of my friends is selling his 05 749 Dark to my OTHER friend. I am trying to help out a bit and find the information on transferring the warranty over to the new owner.

Any relevant help is greatly appreciated.

Cheers!
Just for future reference:

MANUFACTURER'S WARRANTY:

Manufacturer vehicle warranties follow the vehicle, NOT the driver or owner.

Regulatory authorities do NOT allow a manufacturer to void an original warranty period on sale of a vehicle before the expiration date of a warranty. E.g. on a two-year warranty, the vehicle is sold 8 months after the original purchase, the subsequent buyer has 14 months warranty remaining.

Nowadays, all vehicles are linked into a manufacturer's computer database, with VIN [vehicle ID number], date of original sale, etc.

Most vehicle manufacturers do not require a subsequent buyer to do anything in order to get work done under warranty. One simply goes to the Dealer service department, the service intake guy inputs the VIN and other info into the computer, verifies the vehicle is still within the warranty period, and then authorizes the warranty work.

Check your owner's manual, online, or call the dealer to see if there is anything that needs to be done in order to transfer the warranty. Most manufacturers do not require buyer and seller to do anything because it creates more work for the manufacturer or dealer. But check anyway, as there may be some small fee they charge.

I recommend you see in writing what is required or not, do not take some dealership flunkies word for it over the telephone. If a problem comes up, they will deny whatever they said to you on the phone [e.g., "Oh yeah, you don't have to do anything, the car is cover."] Many manufacturers post on their sites the applicable warranty information for vehicles it sells. [Guess they got tired of all the calls].

AFTER-MARKET WARRANTIES:

Generally, I think most of the after-market warranties are a rip-off [due to too many exceptions as to what is covered, fraudulent service providers, etc.] That aside:

These "warranties" have all kinds of creative names, such as service contract, breakdown warranties, extended this or that policies, and even "insurance."
Regardless of the name, the agreements are generally contracts where anything goes [typically NOT in your favor, these are very one-sided agreements that favor the seller of the warranty].

Some of these warranties are considered insurance policies by regulatory agencies. Others are not. Falling outside new vehicle or manufacturer warranty laws, such contracts are NOT regulated under most State's warranty laws. For example, in California, some, but not all, after-market vehicle warranties or service contracts are regulated by the Department of Insurance.

http://www.insurance.ca.gov/0100-consumers/0100-insurance-guides/0100-automobile-series/guide-to-automobile-repair-agreements.cfm#vscpsc

Most States look at after-market warranties, service contracts, or breakdown insurance under "freedom of contract" rules. This means, absent fraud, the parties are free to enter into a contract with whatever terms they want.

Therefore, almost anything goes in regards to what the contract can require, limit or provide. This is relevant here because an after-market "warranty" can say it is NOT transferable, or if it is, under what conditions it is transferable.

Some after-market service policies/warranties say that it is transferable:

-- Upon payment of a fee;

-- That the transfer must be within so many days after a sale of the vehicle to the subsequent buyer.

-- The insurance or warranty company has the right to approve or reject the the transfer request.

Again, the above applies to after-market warranties, not new vehicle product warranties.

Be careful out there.
 
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