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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone here ever trailer their ST3/4? I am planning on moving a 2004 ST4 about 500 miles and am considering trailering it because the long range weather forecast for next weekend isn't looking so hot (no pun intended). I'm wondering where the best points are to tie down a ST4 without damaging the fairing or paint. A friend of mine suggested a Canyon Dancer but said they sometimes mess up your grips and to definitely not use it if the bike had heated grips (which it doesn't). I read similar comments on another forum, so my inclination is to stay away from them, but that brings me back to how do I secure the bike. On the trailer side, U-haul has a motorcycle trailer that I could rent, does anyone have any experience with those. Do they work pretty well for a 500 mile trip at highway speeds?

Right now I'm hoping the forecasts are wrong, and I'll get a window of opportunity in the next 2 weeks to just ride it home.
 

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I know it's considered blasphemy to trailer an ST. But here's what I did when I bought my bike from a dealer in WI (I'm in OH):



It's strapped to the front wheel chock That holds it pretty well. I made it through the road construction in Chicago with no problems.

I was told not to use the rear passenger peg brackets as a strap point because the tabs on the frame could break off.

-Bob
 

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Trailering

I towed an ST2 on my PitBull M/C Trailer for a short distance. I looped nylon straps going up the fork tubes to the triple tree just under the headlight. Didn't secure the rear due to distance traveled. Bike never moved. Be warned of the lack of maintenance on U-Haul trailers. Check the tire pressure yourself. I pulled a tandem axle home several years back to find one tire with 9 psi and the other three seriously low also. The little M/C trailers have 45mph stickers but I'm confident that my brother-in-law exceeded that when pulling a cruiser for 500 miles roundtrip. Hope this helps.

Bobcat
 

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Pick up a sport chock and trailering in a uhaul (or any other flat floored trailer)will be a piece of cake. The chock sets on the floor, you ride into it, get off and you tie from the rear forward. I use "soft loops" on the bars and just use tiedowns to keep the front of the bike from hopping out of the chock. Once you have used a sport chock you are not likely to be without one ever again. A little spendy but will work on your garage floor, pickup bed, etc. Ride in and get off. I have 2 of them in my trailer and they work great.
http://www.baxleycompanies.com/Sportchock.html
 

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I have used a Canyon Dancer successfully for years transportng my various bikes in the back of my truck, including my ST3 when I brought it home after I bought it. The key is to secure the front wheel to a chock and use the CD to help support the bike. I used loops through the frame to attach additonal tie downs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Bobcattoo said:
The little M/C trailers have 45mph stickers but I'm confident that my brother-in-law exceeded that when pulling a cruiser for 500 miles roundtrip. Hope this helps.

Bobcat
45 mph??? Can a Ducati go that slow, even when it is on a trailer?

Thanks everyone for the responses. The trailer is still Plan B, but I feel better about it now.
 

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Hey Bob, what's the story on that trailer set up? I've been looking, but didn't want to part with nearly 2K for a Kendon or Phoenix.
Thanks, Jack.
 

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oldguy said:
Hey Bob, what's the story on that trailer set up? I've been looking, but didn't want to part with nearly 2K for a Kendon or Phoenix.
Thanks, Jack.
It's one of those inexpensive (cheap?) fold up units from Northern Tool. I think Harbor Freight sells them also. It comes unassembled and you have to supply the decking. I used 3/4 inch pressure treated plywood. Mine didn't come with wheels or tires but some do. I put on 12 inch "hi-speed" tires from Wal-Mart.

It's not bad for a casual operation. I bought it to use about once a year to tow my other bike (1977 Yamaha XS750) about 600 miles (one way) to a group gathering.

I have used it in situations like when I bought the Ducati too. The important thing is to remember that the bearings aren't the best. I grease the he** out of mine constantly. So much that the inside of the wheels is a mess.

Problems I've encountered:

1. The fenders will fall off. They are steel and the bracket fatigues at the mount point.

2. The license plate/taillight bracket will fall off. Same with the fenders. The bracket fails because of the weight and vibration.

3. The trailer rides low. Other drivers have a problem, especially if they are in a tall vehicle, seeing it. I've been tagged a couple of times in stop and go traffic. To remedy this I mounted "safety flags" to the rear of the trailer. One is barely visible in the pic. It's the white thing coming up off the back of the trailer. These also help me "see" the back of the trailer when I'm driving.

All in all I haven't had any problems with my setup, but then again I use it maybe twice a year.

-Bob
 

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Trailering, not a problem, suggest a front wheel chock and a canyon dancer. The canyon dancer will help stabilize the bike at the bars to minimize any movement side to side. I also used a set of straps on the trellis, each side back by seat again to stabilize side to side movement.

I was traveling through heavy traffic in LA and want to be sure she would survive any quick stops if i got cut off in traffic, and sure enough had to hit the brakes pretty hard and all was well.

good luck
 

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I've used U-haul trailers and a Canyon Dancer many times to trailer my R6 to/from track days 1-2 hours away. Yeah, the U-haul trailers aren't the best, but they're good enough. My experience is that you need to check the tire pressure after you pick up the trailer. The only bad part is that the U-haul trailers do not have a wheel chock, so you'll have to rig something up. I used a wedge of wood pushed up against the front of the trailer, then used 4 tie downs.

I have since bought a Baxley chock and am looking to purchase my own trailer this spring.
 

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I've used the U-haul m/c trailer a few times, but the furthest I've gone was 200 miles. The m/c specific one can be difficult to find, but it does have an opening in the front for the wheel. I used soft ties looped round the lower triple clamp, and tie-downs out back somewhere, and I always anchor them in a forward position, so all the straps are all pulling the bike forward. I also usually stick a canyon dancer on, just for a little extra security, but I don't crank it down. I think that when loading, it's easier to get the bike stabilized with the canyon dancer, then attach the real tie-downs. If you do go up to the lower triple, depending on where you anchor the tie-downs, you may come in contact with your fender or fairing, so be careful. This method worked for me on both my VFR and my ST4S.

Don't forget to test all the lights for the trailer too...
 

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Instead of the Canyon Dancer, consider the "Cycle Cynch". The adjustable 3 piece design does not put pressure on the grips, controls or clip ons.

http://www.motowheels.com/italian/myProducts.cfm?parentcategoryid=627%7CTrailer%20Accessories&productID=4116&showDetail=1&categoryID=627|Trailer%20Accessories&vendoridtodisplay=0&filterFor=&collection=
 
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