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I opened my clutch up and there’s a lot of rust. I figured it could be just the springs that need replacing or maybe the plates, but with all the rust it might be good to just change it all out at once. What are my options? There’s a few Evoluzone clutch kits on eBay, but I have no idea what I’m getting with a used clutch kit. Thoughts? Any other affordable alternatives that won’t rust?

Also, I like the clutch noise, what’s with all these people trying to make the clutches quite?


 

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Don't jump to a purchase. A good amount of dust can be made with still good plates. At the least, pull a few of the disks and provide us with images.

If you are looking for an excuse for a slipper, I am not going to stop you from that.
 

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So clutches come in a few different arrangements, there's the std set up which is a steel basket and plates, 12 slots, then there's the same in Alloy, which is obviously lighter and if you choose the right one the hard anodised basket means they can last almost as long as a steel set up.
Then you go to the 48t set up which is quieter for longer than the 12t. these are usually always alloy, i've not seen a 48t set up in steel, but it's quite possible they exist.
The older the clutch gets the louder they get, because the tabs of the friction plates get hammered against the slots in the basket, making the gap bigger meaning they move more and make more racket. You're not likely to notice as it happens gradually over time but you certainly will when you replace it, especially with a 48t set up as the tolerances are a bit tighter.
You can choose a slipper clutch, great idea, i love them, but there are quite a few options at varying price points.....

So, affordable? that depends on your budget, what you want to achieve and how much you love your bike and how long you plan to hold on to it.....

I have a preference for alloy baskets and plates, they're a fair bit lighter, 12t or 48t, doesn't matter but 12t cost a little less, i always use genuine plates and i always buy quality aftermarket hard anodised baskets, EVR, STM or V2 for example, there are others.
You can pretty it up with a nice pressure plate, some stainless steel springs and anodised retainers but that's only needed if you run a vented cover so it can be seen, which i would advise on doing.

Of the slipper clutches the EVR is the simplest, easiest to set up and gives predictable forgiving slip, the STM is finicky and prone to break the spider spring and the pack height has to be within a small range.
The factory set up is likely a bucci and they work well, you can find them 2nd hand but you will likely need new plates, steels and basket with any 2nd hand slipper, they're a bit crude compared to aftermarket ones but for road riding they're plenty good enough.
I can say this because i have all three in my bikes, the STM when it's set up right is a masterpiece but the EVR is very nice, almost bullet proof and good value

Any dry clutch will benefit from a strip and clean occasionally, this is good practice, it's a half hour, dirty job that may save you some cash because you get a good look at what it is and can inspect the pressure plate bearing for wear.
When you disassemble it lay the plates in the order you remove them so you know how to put it back together, clean everything with brake kleen and soapy warm water and a brush, let it dry and reassemble, i wouldn't recommend blowing it out with an air line. Look at the steels and if they're blue you can scuff them up with sandpaper, check the basket slots for wear, the friction plate tabs too. Even if everything looks knackered with good clean it will perform better when reassembled and at least you know what you need.
 

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2004 998S FE, 2000 748B, 1986 750 F1
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Do you have an open clutch cover? Then yes, if you have OEM springs which are not stainless, they will rust. A set of stainless springs are cheap enough. However, time to clean and inspect. As loony888 has suggested.

Remove the plates, a bit of thin wire bent at one end to 90 degrees (or thereabouts) can assist with levering them out. A magnetic wand can come in handy too. Place them in order. They need to go back in the order they came out and facing the same way. Inspect all the plates, am attaching a page from the workshop manual for you. If your friction plates look glazed, but are still within tolerance, a scuff will help remove the glazing. We are lucky enough to have a flat concrete apron area outside our garage. So I just put them down and applying a small amount of pressure move the plates over the concrete in a figure 8 motion, this method means that the "wear" you are inducing should be even. Don't go crazy with this, just a bit of a scuff should do it. Having scuffed, make sure your plates are still within the service requirements. Check, check and check again on everything - always.

Have a look at your clutch basket, the tangs will most probably be notchy, removing the notches is pretty much a waste of time, they will just come back again. But you don't want a huge clearance of plate to tang. Refer to image for this.

As everyone else has said I wouldn't dissuade you from putting in a Slipper. I have one in my 998, a Yoyodyne - yes its old, but its good, apart from when it broke a spider spring once, husband does not run one in the 1098, he would like to, but we never got round to getting one.

BTW I like the clutch noise too, he does not.

991226
 

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While my friend @Namor is "not going to stop you" from thinking about replacing your existing clutch with a Slipper, I'll go a bit further and recommend one. The OEM slipper in my R was beat to shit when I took ownership years ago... after doing an appropriate amount of research, I parted with a not insignificant amount of cash and picked up an NGR unit.
991239

10 years on now since it was installed and not a moment of buyers remorse. The craftsmanship and overall build quality are simply top notch... it was worth every penny.
 

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I am at the point of having to do the clutch a third time (39,XXX miles) on my 1098 Streefighter. I am pretty sure I want to do a slipper this time. I was looking at the Ducabike slipper as they seem to do a lot. I really don’t care what is harder or easier to install, I just want reliability and durable. Is the NGR the way to go?


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I am at the point of having to do the clutch a second time (39,XXX miles) on my 1098 Streefighter. I am pretty sure I want to do a slipper this time. I was looking at the Ducabike slipper as they seem to do a lot. I really don’t care what is harder or easier to install, I just want reliability and durable. Is the NGR the way to go?


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I'm not sure NGR is in business any longer... I was not able to find any info regarding current models. EVR clutches are equally well designed and have a build quality which is just as good. (SLIPPER CLUTCHES) And, unlike the NGR, they are available in 48T configurations.

Like the NGR, one of these will not be inexpensive, but IMO, the "flexibility" that a good slipper adds makes one of these money well spent.
 
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