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I can't find my Ducati book and I just go my new tire on my 02 748S

anybody have a book handy and can tell me the torque specifications for the rear nut on the swing arm?

Thanks
 

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Mayor of Simpleton
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All I know is it's real tight.
 

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Those numbers are with grease applied to the nut.
That's true. The book says grease it. If my understanding of this is accurate, the reason is that the specified torque is enough to cause the metal of the nut to flex. The grease prevents thread damage while allowing more turning of the nut before specified torque is reached.
 

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Old Wizard
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Torque Values

A Ducati tech bulletin and their web site specifies 176Nm ± 5% (9Nm) torque requirement for the rear wheel retaining nut (normal thread direction). This converts to 130 ± 6 lb-ft. This value is based on using grease on the threads (this is not optional.)

But check your manual. Ducati specifies a different value 230Nm (170ft-lbs) for the 1098 rear wheel nut.

If the same materials are being fastened together, then they are assembled dry to the manufacturer’s torque values - unless otherwise specified. In critical fasteners such as the axle nut that holds the rear wheel on superbikes, the spec calls for lubricating the threads prior to assembly. This torque spec assumes a lubricated thread.

In general, a thread treated with either an anti-seize or a lubricant requires a lower torque value (than a higher-friction dry thread) to create the same tension in the fastener. So any time you make a modification that changes a component material, such that anti-seize is now needed, you’ll need to torque the fastener to a approximately 10% lower value to avoid over-tensioning the fastener (according to Machinery's Handbook, 25th ed.). A new torque wrench is usually accurate to ± 3%.

DURING INSTALLATION, YOU SHOULD NEVER LOOSEN THE NUT TO INSERT THE PIN. The correct procedure is to torque to the lower value, check for hole alignment and torque up to the higher value if necessary to align the holes.

If the nut is under-torqued it will allow the nut to loosen, allowing the wheel to rotate in its mount and be damaged by repeated acceleration/braking impact loads that will ovalize the four locating pins holes on the backside of the wheel. Damage to the axle spindle can also occur. Also, a loose nut will back-off till it's stopped by the retaining pin, then bend the pin and deform the nut. It's a good idea to mark the nut position with a marking pen, so that you can quickly see if the wheel has moved after a ride or two.
 

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It's a good idea to mark the nut position with a marking pen, so that you can quickly see if the wheel has moved after a ride or two.
I don't suppose you know a source for those marking pens? I never thought of that as a reason to re-mark. Basically you can do a visual to check for loosening hardware. :think:
 
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