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Discussion Starter #1
Getting time to replace my stock clutch on the 999. I have done some thread reading on the benifits of the slipper upgrade.

So what is the opinion out there? I mostly ride this Duc in the hills and canyons and not too much city time. I ride the Duc fairly hard so it is not a poser bike. I have another bike dedicated for the track (Yamaha) because I am not ready to risk putting the Duc down on the track. So I am wondering should I put in the slipper clutch assembly or stick with a OEM parts and do the blingy pressure plate, springs and open cover route. Seems that in the end it almost costs the same. I do like the idea of loosing the downshift hop, but maybe the money would be better off on some other upgrade, brakes come to mind.

Also, I was thinking of a lighter flywheel while I'm at it.
 

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My opinion, your money is better spent elsewhere on a street bike a slipper clutch is a 100% track mod.

As jcns said learn to rev match and buy some bling.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
are you not rev matching?
Rev matching is basically free and your clutch lasts longer.
May feel awkard at first and will take a few tries, but after a while it'll be second nature.
Most of the time I can do this by sound and feel and it is easier if I know the road pretty well. I get the hop if I am coming into a turn that is a little tighter than expected or I am just carrying too much speed on entry.

So that's kinda the thing, maybe the few times I get a hop doesn't seem worth the cost and I hardly think it is a panic for me...just something a bike does and I don't feel I am loosing control. I could see how a hop at just the right/wrong time could cause the tire to re-grip and put you into a high-side situation. That could be spectacular, can you say "broken wrists"? In which case the cost for the slipper is nominal comparitively.
 

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If you do upgrade to a slipper, keep in mind that the plates will need to be changed every 3,000 miles. Not an easy pill to swallow at $200+/- depending where you get the stack from. The slipper is not just a track mod, as it does provide street benefits as well, the one glaring drawback being that if you are in stop and go traffic, you can burn it pretty bad.

Motowheels usually sells a slipper with the Surflex plates for 1G or thereabouts. Probably the best bang for the buck, as I've tried several different clutch packs - and the Surflex is hands down the best I've tried. I still find myself rev matching out of habit...
 

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If you do upgrade to a slipper, keep in mind that the plates will need to be changed every 3,000 miles. Not an easy pill to swallow at $200+/- depending where you get the stack from. The slipper is not just a track mod, as it does provide street benefits as well, the one glaring drawback being that if you are in stop and go traffic, you can burn it pretty bad.
So let's see they wear out incredibly quickly, burn up quickly in stop and go traffic and are expensive. I'm not seeing how they have street applications.

If you're riding hard enough on the street to need one then you should probably spend the money on more insurance or better armor because you're more likely to need those.

YMMV.
 

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If you do upgrade to a slipper, keep in mind that the plates will need to be changed every 3,000 miles.


I would love to know what you are doing that you need to replace a clutch pack at only 3k miles. A slipper does not make the plates wear any quicker unless your stack height is off. It is true that there is a bit more maintenance, but really, checking the stack height is easy and give you a reason to blow out the clutches which also helps them last longer...even without a slipper.
 

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I replaced mine also at 3500 miles.

I did a ton of track days without a slipper and never needed one.

For the street no way. I just rebuilt my clutch and didn't get a slipper.
 

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I've only recently ridden a bike with a slipper clutch. I really fail to see the need for one if you can competently blip the throttle during downshifts (on or off the brakes). I can see it's uses on the track if you're trying to compress the space and time to accomplish all your shifts. Needing one for street riding just speaks to shortage of skill or the need to pose. I would rather save my money on timing belts or tires. Sorry to all those that feel differently. It's just the way I see it :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
just a suggestion. Slow down on the street or take it to a track.
Dude- you don't need to be speeding to get a down-shift hop.

Just an observation from years and years of riding.
 

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Buy a Yoyodyne slipper. It seems to be lasting me longer then others are reporting. I Ride my bike on the track and the street. Sometimes its hard to tell them apart.(just kidding) Any way I blip to rev match but if I mess up its there for me. The plates last fine you just need to shim it when they get low. I dont ride in stop and go trafic ever. Hope this helps
D
 

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I never used a slipper on the street until I put a 6-spring slipper in my 996 and moved my older Evo to my street bike. Not necessary, but it's nice for spirited canyon riding since you don't have to worry about downshifts and rear-tire slips and slides - and once you're used to using a slipper, it's very difficult to go back.
 

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So let's see they wear out incredibly quickly, burn up quickly in stop and go traffic and are expensive. I'm not seeing how they have street applications.

If you're riding hard enough on the street to need one then you should probably spend the money on more insurance or better armor because you're more likely to need those.

YMMV.
My riding consists of street and highway commuting, short trip riding, and longer trips into the numerous foothills and twisty roads that Northern CA has to offer. I do not stick to one single riding application, so considering having a specific set-up for each is not reasonable, I went for what I can afford and what I wanted for my most important rides.
I think your opinion might be valid for your own application, and perhaps the other experts who chimed in, but it does not apply to my situation. As far as rev matching and having it down to a science, sometimes it is not convenient when forced to react to poor road conditions and other less focused driver's actions. In CA the latter is much more common than most other states riders may be used to, considering we have women too beautiful to want to hibernate, and they've been known to drive using the only mirror that is important to them: The Lipstick Compact.

I like my slipper clutch, and I do not consider it to be a 'poser' item. Each rider is going to have differing wear numbers, so the numbers I posted are my own experience through all seasons and conditions. And I don't let my bike even consider hibernating, so let's save the newb and poser comments for someone you may wish to insult for whatever reason you may have, as that seems to be a bit more prevalent here these days. Maybe it's the economy???:rolleyes:
 

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I would love to know what you are doing that you need to replace a clutch pack at only 3k miles. A slipper does not make the plates wear any quicker unless your stack height is off. It is true that there is a bit more maintenance, but really, checking the stack height is easy and give you a reason to blow out the clutches which also helps them last longer...even without a slipper.
I don't necessarily replace at 3,000 miles, but that is the mark when I notice enough wear to make an adjustment with the stack, which I most certainly do before replacing the pack. I take good care of my 996 with all the maintenance one should do following a ride like chain lube, clutch & brake bleeding, lights and operational checks, etc. I am a painter, so I regularly blow out my clutch pack and brakes, considering my bike sits right next to my compressor. I think more than anything else, my use of engine braking is the main factor for wear on my clutch.
 

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Slipper Clutch

I have had slipper clutches in my 888spo and presently in my track-bike, the 996sps. Yes the plate-pack wear quicker, 5k miles max! And I replace both frictions/metals with Surflex only, great product indeed, but on the track you need it, on the street its a luxury. I use now only a Motowheels assembly.

I've used the 996 on the street and love the way I can bang gears wtihout going sideways, way good, and lighter than a stock clutch, yet they do make extra noise, they give a different feel to the clutch lever. Yet I have a lightened crank/rods/flywheel and 13 to 1 compression, and on this bike you really need one. The power is peaky, and has a narrow powerband. I would never ride this bike without one, street or track

My 999s is street bike only, at least for now, and I focus a bit more on my down shifts these days. I thought about another Slipper for this bike, but really I do not need it. I still ride fast in the Santa Cruz mountains all the way up the coast, and in the Sierra's. But the 999 has way more flywheel and useable power down low than my track bike. So on the 999 I can torque out of turns and do not need to be in those high RPM's where the track bike needs to be.

Bottom line it's a great addition to any Ducati, but I'll leave my 999s alone and will ALWAYS use one on the track...

Cheers,
Mark
 

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You guys need to start using more modern slipper clutches.

I ride my 1098 only on the streets (be it city, burbs, or mtns), and I've had an EVR Slipper Clutch installed for the past 11,000 miles. I have yet to replace the clutch pack once because they use a much smarter design in the EVR over your previous STM's, Bucci's, Yoyodine, etc...

The EVR Clutch has a 48 tooth hub, basket, and plate set up, not the standard 12, and it actually does last 4 times as long as your standard 12 tooth slipper.

The EVR also doesn't raise the entire hub and clutch assembly on bearings (that need to be maintained btw) everytime you actuate the clutch - unlike the STM's, Bucci's, etc...

The EVR works by simply raising and lowering the pressure plate - same as your oem clutch.

Ohh and if you'd like a second opinion, contact our winningest sponsored racer, Aaron Borrelo is almost finished with his second race season and has yet to swap the plates once (although he has commented to me how everyone else he sees in the pits changes their plates every 3-5 races).



Ok, now that we have covered the wear issue, lets cover the "why".

A slipper clutch will do two things, make you faster, and make you safer.

Anyone who doesn't want those two things, need not buy a slipper clutch.



Now the sales pitch:

If you would like to get one, we are now North America's largest distributor of EVR Slipper Clutches, and have them sale priced at $1149.95 here - http://bellissimoto.com/Clutchparts.html

We have about a dozen in stock for every dry clutch ducati, including the 1098/1198.
 

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Ah, can you be more specific about how the clutch you sell is different from the clutches that others sell? For example, the 48T/12T comparison is bogus, unless perhaps you're talking about the ultimate limit of the clutch lifetime which can be extremely long - what happens in reality is that you destroy the clutch plates long before you have to worry about destroying the basket and hub, just from frictional wear. My old Evo burned through clutch plates quite rapidly, but my 6-spring STM has run the same clutch plates for the past 5 years, 3 seasons of racing and 2 seasons of track days. Why is an EVR clutch so magical?


You guys need to start using more modern slipper clutches.

I ride my 1098 only on the streets (be it city, burbs, or mtns), and I've had an EVR Slipper Clutch installed for the past 11,000 miles. I have yet to replace the clutch pack once because they use a much smarter design in the EVR over your previous STM's, Bucci's, Yoyodine, etc...

The EVR Clutch has a 48 tooth hub, basket, and plate set up, not the standard 12, and it actually does last 4 times as long as your standard 12 tooth slipper.

The EVR also doesn't raise the entire hub and clutch assembly on bearings (that need to be maintained btw) everytime you actuate the clutch - unlike the STM's, Bucci's, etc...

The EVR works by simply raising and lowering the pressure plate - same as your oem clutch.

Ohh and if you'd like a second opinion, contact our winningest sponsored racer, Aaron Borrelo is almost finished with his second race season and has yet to swap the plates once (although he has commented to me how everyone else he sees in the pits changes their plates every 3-5 races).



Ok, now that we have covered the wear issue, lets cover the "why".

A slipper clutch will do two things, make you faster, and make you safer.

Anyone who doesn't want those two things, need not buy a slipper clutch.



Now the sales pitch:

If you would like to get one, we are now North America's largest distributor of EVR Slipper Clutches, and have them sale priced at $1149.95 here - http://bellissimoto.com/Clutchparts.html

We have about a dozen in stock for every dry clutch ducati, including the 1098/1198.
 
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