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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So with the season end in sight, my 916 will sadly again be in a leaky, ancient garden shed here in canada for at least 5 months. Temps will be regularly below 0°F...

Last year I simply filled the tank full with zero ethanol fuel, added Sta-Bil, and let it sleep thru winter. It started in Spring without a problem.

But is the smart move here to fog the intake while the bike is running before putting her to bed? Is metal on metal contact a real concern when starting the bike back up Spring if I don't fog?
 

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Any chance you can put a small heater in the shed?
 

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So with the season end in sight, my 916 will sadly again be in a leaky, ancient garden shed here in canada for at least 5 months. Temps will be regularly below 0°F...

Last year I simply filled the tank full with zero ethanol fuel, added Sta-Bil, and let it sleep thru winter. It started in Spring without a problem.

But is the smart move here to fog the intake while the bike is running before putting her to bed? Is metal on metal contact a real concern when starting the bike back up Spring if I don't fog?
Mechanically speaking, as long as your oil is clean and oil pressure is good then all of the piston/cylinder surfaces should have a film on them when you shut the bike down. Fogging certainly wouldn't hurt... I just don't know if it's necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I just don't know if it's necessary.
This is the nut. I've heard the cylinders will be probably fine, but intake and valves will be susceptible to condensation ---> corrosion. This is where fogging straight down the bellmouths while the motor is running may help? I'm guessing this involves lifting the (full) tank with one hand while spraying with the other...

I noticed a lot of the alloy bolts were furry and white by Spring this year and I feel bad as the PO kept the bike in a heated garage every winter.

There's no chance of moving the bike inside, or heating the wooden tent/shed, unfortunately. Putting the old girl in the lounge is not an option... next year a proper insulated cabin will be built!
 

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If you have to store it in the shed then spray it first with ACF 50; that should take care of external corrosion.
 
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I've never fogged a bike. I've stored bikes as long as 6 months while I was still in the military, no problems at all. Some of the places I lived were very hot and humid some cold like you're talking about. 13 years in my current location. We get long cold winters here too. Bikes get stored in an unheated garage. Sometimes the temp differential is enough to cause condensation on the tanks when the door is left open long enough. Full tanks with fuel stabilizer, on a rear stand (to keep it level), no cover. Don't periodically start it, ever.

Maybe if the bike needed to be stored for a long period of time, like years, I'd fog the cylinders and maybe the intake. For the winter? I don't. I worry more about mice getting in the exhaust and air box than I do condensation.
 

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The best and easiest way to corrosion proof the motor is add some two stroke oil to the fuel and take it for a run before shutting it down for the winter.
Also plug the air intakes and exhausts with oiled soft rags to keep condensation from forming and vermin making little houses in there.
 

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If your rings and valve guides are doing what they are suppose to do there’s essentially no oil in the cylinders. That’s just the way it works.

If you’re worried about your cylinders rusting which is pretty far fetched, the cure is to pull the plugs and squirt some oil in the cylinders and turn the motor over by hand a few times.

Valves don’t rust.

Unless you’re storing a motor for decades it’s just not something to worry about.

YMMV.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Well.. even though our fuel is supposed to be ethanol free.. I still find a whitish powder coating under the fuel cap on the Duc and through the carbies on my older bikes, it even builds up on the slide needles and if not manually cleaned off with a worn out Scotchbrite pad causes lean running.
The two stroke oil in the fuel stops that dead in it's tracks.
I dose it at about 1000:1 ratio, that's all it needs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the replies.

Looks like fogging is considered overkill for my needs.

I'll instead go with a full tank of Shell 91, Sta-Bil fuel treatment, oil change, chain clean, ACF-50 spray, intake & exhaust plugs and bike should be good to go for 2020 and its 25th birthday.
 

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This might be of interest to you.
https://www.carcoon.com/carcoon-bikebubble/outdoor-bikebubble-short

Bikebubble creates a protective, mini-environment around the bike. Within the storage environment, air is continuously re-circulated using Activated Carbon filters. The result of this inner circulation means that the bike is effectively stored in its own ‘clean room’ and is protected from the elements during the damp winter months.

My 999 is stored outside 24/7, I use the Double-Skin Insulated Model, it does exactly what it say's on the tin.
 

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My bikes come in the house in the winter... but back when I had cars I didn't drive in the winter that sat in cold temps and moisture I bought a big airtight bag (you can find them online). You drive the vehicle into the bag, throw in a couple large bags of recyclable desiccant, and close it up for the winter. IMO it's the best way to store vehicles outside... no moisture to cause damage.

edit - yea... basically what the guy above said.
 

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No reason to fog the cylinders unless your injectors leak and wash the cylinder walls down. You piston and cylinders are aluminum. Valves are hardened steel, they won't rust. I do pull the fuel pump fuse and turn the engine over until I have full oil pressure before I ever start the bike after sitting.

If you run a good oil, there will be a film on everything but I don't trust my rockers on a cold start after a few months without cycling oil through the heads first. Just my two cents...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok, but how do you know you are at 'full' oil pressure?

Doesn't it take around 90 seconds with the engine running to get oil into the head?
 

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No
 
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