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So, it's gotten colder earlier than expected here in the Midwest
and I'll be winterizing my 749 soon.
With my monster I had previously filled my tank and added stabilizer
only to discover my plastic tank had swelled over the Winter.
Although the 749 has a metal tank I have heard that the ethanol content
can turn fuel lines into jelly over time.
My bike will probably sit 3-4 months in an unheated garage.
Is it better to just drain the tank and not bother to fill it?
 

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You can drain the tank but you will still have small amounts of fuel in your lines/injectors and such. Stabilize the fuel, give the bike one last good run to get the stabilizer into all of the tight places then drain the tank.. Nothing good can come from four month old ethanol.

999S
GSXR750
Z1000
 

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Better to leave steel tanks full.

- less prone to rust when full
- less likely to explode when full

Non-oxygenated fuel (ie fuel without ethanol blended in) is most stable. Either fill you tank up and run this type of fuel through your bike as Chuck mentions or fill with common pump gas and add a fuel stabilizer (eg Stabil) amd run your bike till this has gone through your enitre fuel system.
 

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I've never drained gas, oil or anything for winter storage. Didn't even do it for extended 6 month storage periods resulting from being deployed when I was still active Navy.

Add fuel stabilizer, maybe fresh oil if you have more than say 1000 miles in it. Get the battery on a tender, tires off the ground, plug the exhaust tips and intakes (if applicable) to keep the critters out, cover it and forget about it. No need (and best not to) start the thing every month or whatever.

When it's time to take it out. Do your normal pre-ride check (tires and such) and go. Running the gas with the stabilizer is no issue at all. In fact, it may run better depending on the stuff you use. I've been using Star Tron for storage and a dose every few tank fulls and it's a good cleaner / maintenance against ethanol as well as good for storage.
 

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why would it be more likely to explode when empty??
When I was a teen, my dad's secondary fuel tank on his F250 lost it's bracket. Not to worry, I'll weld it for you says I. Off came the tank, rinsed with water and started to weld the bracket back to the side. Well, a single rinse with water was not enough...there was a "whoooshing" sound" followed but a small explosion. :eek: I think I increased the capacity of that tank by a half gallon! All the sides were a bit bowed out. The lesson gained on that day: gas fumes are pretty darn dangerous.
 

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Any way you can get ahold of non-ethanol fuel?
In Illinois? No effin way. You can get non ethanol in some places in Wisconsin or drive 2+ hours south to possibly find some.

I suggest filling a steel tank to the top. Rust is the big issue here. Ethanol dissolving hoses (rare) is not as big of a concern.
 

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Explosion requires lots of oxygen so lots of combustion can happen in a short period of time. A full tank, minimizes the amount of oxygen available for combustion.
You still need a spark. It's like saying a magnum bullet is more prone to ignition than a regular one. I say your argument in general is invalid.
 

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You still need a spark. It's like saying a magnum bullet is more prone to ignition than a regular one. I say your argument in general is invalid.
I don't understand the analogy, gunpowder doesn't need atmospheric oxygen to ignite?

Not relating to motorcycle gas tanks.....what I do know is that magnum cartridges are harder to ignite than std loads b/c they use large charges of slow burning powder...thus the need for magnum (hotter) primers to set them off. (eg. Win 296/H110 = slow hard to ignite vs Win 231 or Bullseye = fast burning easy to ignite)
 

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I don't understand the analogy, gunpowder doesn't need atmospheric oxygen to ignite?

Not relating to motorcycle gas tanks.....what I do know is that magnum cartridges are harder to ignite than std loads b/c they use large charges of slow burning powder...thus the need for magnum (hotter) primers to set them off. (eg. Win 296/H110 = slow hard to ignite vs Win 231 or Bullseye = fast burning easy to ignite)
The analogy is that it still needs a spark.

I can't say that I have ever heard of a motorcycle gas tank exploding on it's own. Nor a 1/2 full gas can in a garage nor a bullet. It takes some kind of ignition. And don't tell me static. It doesn't happen.
 

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VP110 race fuel is ethanol free.

Any way you can get ahold of non-ethanol fuel?
I was just thinking yesterday of where to store my surplus 5 gallons of left over VP110 I did not get to use this summer in my trials bike.

:think:

You have given me the idea to store it in my ST tank over the winter Chuck.

Thanks,

Bob
 

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In Illinois? No effin way. You can get non ethanol in some places in Wisconsin or drive 2+ hours south to possibly find some.

I suggest filling a steel tank to the top. Rust is the big issue here. Ethanol dissolving hoses (rare) is not as big of a concern.
Yeah there are quite a few places around Madison to get ethanol free. For me I always use the marine sta-bil (blue) which is designed to treat ethanol fuels in open fuel systems (bikes and boats) and fill the tank to the top. It prevents the ethanol from soaking up a bunch of water and going bad.

-Bryan
 

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I don't drain my tank at all, I just drain all the fluid and check the timing after the season ends just to be sure that all of it would be fresh and new.
 
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