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Discussion Starter #1
So I just acquired a 2001 996 from the stealership. 6001 miles and no maintenance records whatsoever. I'm positive the 6000 mile service has not been done. They also told me, after i paid for it of course, that the rear wheel bearing will need to be replaced soon. Question is this, should I drop over a grand on special tools and what not to do the service myself (valve adjustment, timing belt etc etc) or just pay someone to get it up to speed and then go the DIY route after I at least know everything is up to specs. Thanks for the advice guys (and girls).
 

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I suspect everyone here will give you a different answer. The proper answer for you depends on different factors, not the least of which may be:
How mechanically inclined are you?
How long do you plan on keeping the bike?(the initial outlay for the tools could easily pay for themselves)

Personally I would take it to an experienced tech. to make sure that everything is well sorted and that you didn't get sold a sludge factory.
From there, I would slowly start digging into the bike on my own as you gain tools, and experience.

Generally speaking, you made a mistake in buying a Ducati with no maintenance records. I was guilty of that with my first Ducati also. It certainly cost me.
 

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I suspect everyone here will give you a different answer. The proper answer for you depends on different factors, not the least of which may be:
How mechanically inclined are you?
How long do you plan on keeping the bike?(the initial outlay for the tools could easily pay for themselves)

Personally I would take it to an experienced tech. to make sure that everything is well sorted and that you didn't get sold a sludge factory.
From there, I would slowly start digging into the bike on my own as you gain tools, and experience.

Generally speaking, you made a mistake in buying a Ducati with no maintenance records. I was guilty of that with my first Ducati also. It certainly cost me.
Plus 1...

I would have this service performed by a Ducati experienced tech. Have them go thru it with a fine tooth comb if necessary but make sure it gets a clean bill of health a consider this a baseline datum, i.e., it's service history starts now.

Gradually ease your way into what service you are comfortable performing, no need to rush and risk making a mistake. And one more thing, make sure you get a workshop manual... Absolute must have whether you do your own work or not.
 

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That bearing puller will not work on the rear wheel of a 996. The bearing is inside the swingarm and is a special type.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I suspect everyone here will give you a different answer. The proper answer for you depends on different factors, not the least of which may be:
How mechanically inclined are you?
How long do you plan on keeping the bike?(the initial outlay for the tools could easily pay for themselves)

Personally I would take it to an experienced tech. to make sure that everything is well sorted and that you didn't get sold a sludge factory.
From there, I would slowly start digging into the bike on my own as you gain tools, and experience.

Generally speaking, you made a mistake in buying a Ducati with no maintenance records. I was guilty of that with my first Ducati also. It certainly cost me.
I plan on keeping her for the long haul and I'm fairly good on the mechanical side. Have owned several BMW's and done most the work myself so I can't imagine a Ducati being that difficult but I could be wrong.

Ya, the only reason I even considered it with no records is because technically speaking it was not due for any type of service yet (aside from maybe an oil change but I'll do that myself). I know with BMW you can go to any dealer with your VIN and they will tell you all the work that has been done on the car regardless of where it was done (provided it was at a legit dealership) is this possible with Ducati?
 

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I'm not sure why everyone seems to thnk very low miles on a used Ducati is such a positive. Only 6000 miles since 2001? That's less than 600 miles a year! If that odo is correct and not tampered with in some way (or replaced with the original reading lost), I'd worry the poor thing sat unused for long stretches. If so, was it properly prepared for inactivity? How well could this have been broken in if it was used so little? How in hell did the rear wheel bearing go with only 6000 miles on it? (seized up fom disuse, or was this a track day hound?)

In this situation I would most definitely recommend a thorough going over by an authorized Duc expert tech. Make sure you ask them to check that all recall work that may have been required has been done. (With a bike used so little, the original owner may have neglected this.)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
How in hell did the rear wheel bearing go with only 6000 miles on it? (seized up fom disuse, or was this a track day hound?)

In this situation I would most definitely recommend a thorough going over by an authorized Duc expert tech. Make sure you ask them to check that all recall work that may have been required has been done. (With a bike used so little, the original owner may have neglected this.)
Ya, I was wondering the same thing about the rear wheel bearing. Ascetically it looks great but of course that doesn't say anything about the internals. Is recall work done free of charge? I found an independent duc service shop that seems to be top notch up near Akron.
 

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Ya, I was wondering the same thing about the rear wheel bearing.
Does seem suspicious, unless it was stored in the wet and rusted?

I don't know of many 916 series bikes that have needed new rear wheel bearings - mine's done 42k miles and the (original) bearings are still good.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Does seem suspicious, unless it was stored in the wet and rusted?

I don't know of many 916 series bikes that have needed new rear wheel bearings - mine's done 42k miles and the (original) bearings are still good.
Perhaps the stealership just told me that so I'd come back in with more money? Is there an easy way to check them? They pulled the bike off the showroom floor and 20 mins later came back and said "oh btw, we're required to tell you this, you may need new rear bearings in the near future. Our mechanic just looked the bike over."
 

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I hope you didn't buy this from a Ducati dealership. If so, they should have done all the maintenance before selling it to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I hope you didn't buy this from a Ducati dealership. If so, they should have done all the maintenance before selling it to you.
I did....Needless to say, I won't be going back there. I asked for service records and they just deflected the question as if that was unimportant. I would have assumed they checked it out but I highly doubt they did. Especially sending out a bike that needs rear bearings, which according to my research is a pretty simple and cheap fix.

So when I pulled her out today I rolled back and forth with the engine off and heard what sounded like a slight clunk sound from the rear. About every half rotation or so. Could this be the bearing or is that a normal sound?
 

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Rear wheel bearing

I bought a 2000 748R with 2500 km and as the tires were original, they were petrified, so I had them replaced. During the tire change the dealer checked the bearings and found the rear bearing to be corroded. They took some digital pics and to me it looked like electrolysis corrosion. Bottom line, they said to keep an eye on it, but at this point I did not need to replace.

I would not sweat this too much. If your rear bearing is going, it's not from abusive use, more likely corrosion. Secondly, I think that you are just getting gear thrash or a stiff link in the chain when rolling back and forth. Pull the chain and then spin the rear wheel.
 

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Is there an easy way to check them?
It's easy enough to remove the rear hub to get at everything, just remove the wheel, sprocket carrier, brake caliper etc and slide the axle out.

You'll need to supprot the rear end off the ground (axle stands under foorpegs) but no special tools required other than a 46 &41mm socket for the wheel and sprocket carrier nuts.

Maybe a strip down & grease will solve the problem plus you'll get chance to check it all out.
 

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Ignorance...

Pardon my ignorance, but at 6000 miles, what maintenance would have been done? An oil change maybe? The first major service?

The wheel bearing having gone out leads me to wonder whether that odometer reading is correct?
 

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Pardon my ignorance, but at 6000 miles, what maintenance would have been done? An oil change maybe? The first major service?

The wheel bearing having gone out leads me to wonder whether that odometer reading is correct?
Most things would probably be as much due to time and neglect as they are mileage.

Oil change
Antifreeze change
Valve Adjustment
Belts changed (check tensioner bearings)
Fuel filter change
In-tank fuel line replacement
spark plugs replace
Check alternator wiring for burning/brittleness
Fork oil change
Steering head bearings greased
Change fluid/bleed front & rear brakes + clutch
Check clutch slave cylinder for leakage
Grease swingarm bearings & rear suspension linkage
Change rear wheel bearing (check chain for wear as over-tightening might be the cause of the bearing failure)

Other possibles: cam seals (there are 5), flaking rockers.

So what would I do?
Buy/rent the tools you need, get a factory service manual, and the Haynes manual. Pull the motor or at least strip the bike of all its bodywork. Take your time and go through everything. Your time is free, the mechanic's is not. You will spend more than the cost of taking it to the dealer, plus you know it is done right and complete (even if it takes you a couple of times to get it right).

The only thing on the list above you might want the dealer to do is the valve check, rocker check, cam seals, and belts. Everything else is pretty easy DIY. And if you take it to them stripped down and drained of fluids, your bill for those items should be less.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Most things would probably be as much due to time and neglect as they are mileage.

Oil change
Antifreeze change
Valve Adjustment
Belts changed (check tensioner bearings)
Fuel filter change
In-tank fuel line replacement
spark plugs replace
Check alternator wiring for burning/brittleness
Fork oil change
Steering head bearings greased
Change fluid/bleed front & rear brakes + clutch
Check clutch slave cylinder for leakage
Grease swingarm bearings & rear suspension linkage
Change rear wheel bearing (check chain for wear as over-tightening might be the cause of the bearing failure)

Other possibles: cam seals (there are 5), flaking rockers.

So what would I do?
Buy/rent the tools you need, get a factory service manual, and the Haynes manual. Pull the motor or at least strip the bike of all its bodywork. Take your time and go through everything. Your time is free, the mechanic's is not. You will spend more than the cost of taking it to the dealer, plus you know it is done right and complete (even if it takes you a couple of times to get it right).

The only thing on the list above you might want the dealer to do is the valve check, rocker check, cam seals, and belts. Everything else is pretty easy DIY. And if you take it to them stripped down and drained of fluids, your bill for those items should be less.

Alright, now that's a to do list I can work with. Just ordered the Haynes manual and desmotimes the other day. Once those get here I'll get to the above list and removing the panels in prep for the duc tech visit. (Is the factory service manual the same one that came with the bike or something else?)

I'm trying my best not to ride it much for fear of screwing something up worse but every time I go in the garage she just looks at me almost begging me to take her for a spin...

Thanks for all the replies and support guys. It's very much appreciated and hopefully one day soon I can give the same back to the community.
 

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Perhaps the stealership just told me that so I'd come back in with more money? Is there an easy way to check them? They pulled the bike off the showroom floor and 20 mins later came back and said "oh btw, we're required to tell you this, you may need new rear bearings in the near future. Our mechanic just looked the bike over."
This sounds SO much like a 'line' that wouldn't be at all surprised if it was the salesman that said it.

So, they didn't do any maintenance on the bike, but in 20 minutes determined that the rear wheel bearings "might" need replacing? Yikes! I hear the line spinning off the reel as we speak.

Go check out the bearings for yourself. At this point, I would take what the dealer said with a grain of salt. And never return, either. Just on G.P.

This sounds too much like the Honda dealership telling my wife she needs a new master cylinder because they saw some oil residue on the firewall. (Wasn't even fresh). I cleaned the firewall and it is still in the car, working fine. They said the same thing about the front struts. "Oh, they are going bad." Not because they no longer dampen movement (their intended function) but because they saw what looked like a leak in that area. I pushed on the front bumper and, viola!, they dampen just like they are supposed to.

If you ever decide to go back to the dealer regarding the rear bearings, ask how they determined that they might need to be replaced "in the near future". I think the answer will be enlightening (and most likely, entertaining as well)
 

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Alright, now that's a to do list I can work with. Just ordered the Haynes manual and desmotimes the other day. Once those get here I'll get to the above list and removing the panels in prep for the duc tech visit. (Is the factory service manual the same one that came with the bike or something else?)

I'm trying my best not to ride it much for fear of screwing something up worse but every time I go in the garage she just looks at me almost begging me to take her for a spin...

Thanks for all the replies and support guys. It's very much appreciated and hopefully one day soon I can give the same back to the community.
duc.nu has a factory workshop manual you can download for about $5.
Ducatiusa has the parts manuals available for free download.

My first post should have said that having all of these done at the dealer would cost more than buying the tools. Didn't word it that way.

You also don't have to buy the Ducati factory tools. Today there are many aftermarket tools available that are cheaper and work just as well. Back in the day it was Ducati or make your own....
http://www.motomfg.com/DUCATI_TOOLS_s/1.htm
http://motoreva.com/item.cfm?itemid=111&categoryid=171
http://www.desmotimes.com/product911.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #20
duc.nu has a factory workshop manual you can download for about $5.
Ducatiusa has the parts manuals available for free download.

My first post should have said that having all of these done at the dealer would cost more than buying the tools. Didn't word it that way.

You also don't have to buy the Ducati factory tools. Today there are many aftermarket tools available that are cheaper and work just as well. Back in the day it was Ducati or make your own....
We offer high quality tools to service your ducati motorcycle including clutch tool valve tools wheel tools and billet accessories
MotoReva - Ducati Tools and Supplies
Desmo Times Product 911 - VDST Software
Sweet... So the indy shop I found quoted me this for a 6k mile service.

"If your valves are still in spec, the charge is $400, plus parts. If the valves need serviced, the charge could be $450-500, essentially."

Oil and filter: $60.00
Timing belts: $95.00
Adjuster nuts: $10.00
Synthetic brake/clutch fluid: $10.00
Engine coolant: $15.00

He also had this to say about the bearings, "I'm not sure why someone told you that you'd need a rear wheel bearing replacement, but I can inspect this if you decide to bring the bike to me for service. I've yet to replace any rear bearings on a Superbike.. especially with such low mileage. They're sealed from the factory and don't require any service or greasing."

So yeah, I'll knock out the easy stuff and leave the belts, valves, etc. to him, for now. Once I get all the tools then I should be able to do the valves the next time around.
 
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