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My research has let me to the conclusion that the Bridgestone BT016 size-for-size are lighter that the Pirelli and Michellin equivilents. If I am mistaken perhaps someone could correct me.

I was reading an article in the hall of wisdom regarding decreasing rotational mass by using a lighter tire so I was playing around on the Internet to see what everything weighs. Thanks!
 

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My research has let me to the conclusion that the Bridgestone BT016 size-for-size are lighter that the Pirelli and Michellin equivilents. If I am mistaken perhaps someone could correct me.

I was reading an article in the hall of wisdom regarding decreasing rotational mass by using a lighter tire so I was playing around on the Internet to see what everything weighs. Thanks!
That's my conclusion as well. Using lighter tires should make a big difference. Enjoy your new "free magnesium wheels"...
 

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Heavier usually means thicker construction and henceforth better tire wear.
Not necesarily... carcass material plays a big factor in weight, and even bigger factor in the tire's feel/feedback. Weight and wear characteristics are pretty much irrelevant of each other
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Either way I'll be on the road WAY more than the track. Just trying to squeeze a little more out of my 749s.
 

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I recently installed BT-016s and love them! That's all I know. :sleep:
 

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Unless the lighter tires you use are junk!

Dunlops are heavy, but they make the arguably best tires for the track.

Heavier usually means thicker construction and henceforth better tire wear.
Check the thread called "free magnesium wheels". Dunlop Qualifiers are not heavy at all. They are next lightest compared to Bridgestone.
 

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It doesn't make any difference on the street, if you feel that you need to use those lighter tires to go that much faster on the street, maybe it's time to get on the track and find out how fast you really are. Or aren't.
 

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It doesn't make any difference on the street, if you feel that you need to use those lighter tires to go that much faster on the street, maybe it's time to get on the track and find out how fast you really are. Or aren't.
I disagree. Light tires are a safety feature. Anything that helps my bike stay in contact with the pavement through the rough and bumpy streets is a good thing. Heavy tires and wheels will make the wheel stay off the road for longer when a bump is encountered. One of the main reasons for lighter weight wheels and tires is to make it stay in contact with the road for better grip and confidence. When a heavy wheel hits a bump at speed, it will tend to stay airborne for longer because of Newton's laws of inertia. A lighter wheel will come back down much faster, given the same suspension. Further, the ability to brake from the same speed in a shorter distance is also a safety factor. Having lighter wheels and tires means that the same brakes will make that wheel stop faster than a heavy wheel. This could mean the difference between hitting something and not hitting something, or whether you go to the hospital or just have to change your underwear...

Also, anything that makes the bike handle better can also mean getting out of the way of a potential accident. So lighter wheels makes the bike react more quickly in an emergency...
 

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Boy that's splitting hairs. If you or I were to ride the same bike down a bumpy road, once with light tires, the next time with heavier tires (and we're talking a spread of about two pounds here), we may be able to tell a difference. But if you're close enough to the edge in the real world that the weight of a tire make the difference between crash/no crash, I'd say you have many other issues and events to take a look at first.
 

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Boy that's splitting hairs. If you or I were to ride the same bike down a bumpy road, once with light tires, the next time with heavier tires (and we're talking a spread of about two pounds here), we may be able to tell a difference. But if you're close enough to the edge in the real world that the weight of a tire make the difference between crash/no crash, I'd say you have many other issues and events to take a look at first.
+1
 

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Light tires are a safety feature.
I guess if you live in bumpyville and your wheels are made of cast iron and tires made of sold rubber. But in all honesty, nobody... I mean nobody can notice the difference between 2 lb's of rotating mass (1lb ft/1lb rear)

Todays Ducati's come with pretty light wheels, my 848's wheels are staggeringly light, I'm shocked every time I pull them off. My friends R6 wheels are bloody boat anchors, they're so heavy, you strain muscles taking them off the bike. Yet, guys on 600's never complain about heavy wheels, in fact most people who own Japanese bikes don't even upgrade the wheels, yet us Ducati riders are all about lighter wheels!

Sure, lighter rotational mass does help on the track when your doing rapid direction changes. But in all honesty, having ridden lots of different bikes on the track, suspension setup makes much more of a difference then slightly lighter wheels or tires. You can go by numbers all you want, but numbers don't necessarily equate to a decent setup.



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Boy that's splitting hairs. If you or I were to ride the same bike down a bumpy road, once with light tires, the next time with heavier tires (and we're talking a spread of about two pounds here), we may be able to tell a difference. But if you're close enough to the edge in the real world that the weight of a tire make the difference between crash/no crash, I'd say you have many other issues and events to take a look at first.
An 8% reduction in the moment of inertia translates into an 8% shorter braking distance, assuming no skidding. For a braking distance of 100 ft, that means stopping 8 feet sooner. That is not insignificant.
 

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I have seen a 4 rwhp difference between two different make tires of the same exact tire size. Yeah, there is a difference.

Had one guy all upset that his Ninja 636 made a 'low' number on the dyno (115 rwhp) until I pointed out that he had a Michelin Power One tire on the back. Power One's are essentially DOT slicks, and they are NOT light, but are very very good racing tires.

I told him if he wants to make 'the number', stick a used up Ninja 250 140/55/17 tire with 70 psi in it on the back, clean the chain and lube it, and he'll probably get another 15 rwhp from doing that alone.

He felt better.



But yes, most of us will not be able to tell the difference from the weights of the tires. Just go with what works best as far as longetivity and grip.

Dunlop 211 n-techs
Pilot One's
Diablo Supercorsa's
Bridgestone 003r
Metzler Renntech's

All great tires.
 

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i'm running the bt-016 tires and bought cause of price,have been impressed at the shape,grip and wear.learning that they are lighter makes them a no-brainer now as the tire of choice .any item thats lighter gets my attention in the world of sportbikes.as every little bit adds up
 

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i'm running the bt-016 tires and bought cause of price,have been impressed at the shape,grip and wear.learning that they are lighter makes them a no-brainer now as the tire of choice .any item thats lighter gets my attention in the world of sportbikes.as every little bit adds up
Yeah. look at the bicyclists. They measure stuff like tires in grams... Things like that are sold with the weight in plain sight. Why people would think it's different with motorcycles is confusing to me.
 
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