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Buzzing the tower
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It's all about getting the surface of the tire scrubbed before you commit to full traction. You can go 100 miles and still have 'release compound' on the tire when you commit to a full-lean corner. I ride around the neighborhood turning back and forth at low speed to get the tire in contact with the road while not at a 'full commit' speed. I mean low speed while almost scraping toes. A few trips around the block has always worked for me. I'm sure I look like a tool, but I've never had a new tire slide on me when I head out for "full-goose bozo". :)
 

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How many miles should I put on a new set of Michelin 2ct's before I start cranking down on the throttle ?


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I do a small burn out to bring a little smoke, hit the highways get the tire up to operating temps then I hit the clover leafs, gradually going lower and lower around the curves. But slow manovers work well but can take a bit longer to scrub in.

If your bike was on the showroom floor or has that shinny spray on them throw bike on stands use some dirt and sand paper to get the oil and skuff them up a bit otherwise u won't make the next stop sign.
 

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Here is what Dunlop says:
High-Performance Dunlop Motorcycle Tires

11 - Run-in Period

Replacements for worn, differently patterned or constructed tires will not react the same. When new tires are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power, abrupt lean-over or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of approximately 100 miles has been covered. This will permit the rider to become accustomed to the feel of the new tires or tire combination, find the edge and achieve optimum road grip for a range of speeds, acceleration and handling uses. Advise your customer to check and adjust inflation pressure to recommended levels after tires cool for at least three (3) hours following run-in. Remember, new tires will have a very different contact patch and lean-over edge. New tires, mixing a new tire with a worn tire and mixing different pattern combinations may adversely affect ride and handling and will require careful ride evaluation.

I'm hitting the track Saturday with brand new, unscrubbed tires, I guess I just take it easy on the first session. The will be my first time on the Q2s also, coming off the Power Pures.
 

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Usually the compounds that are in the tire to keep it good during storage and get it out of the moulds(but also make it a bit slick) has to "sweat out of the tire. I usually just use the trip back from my tire guy to get the stuff out, which is ~35km. I would take 50km(30 miles) just to be sure.
 

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It's all about getting the surface of the tire scrubbed before you commit to full traction. You can go 100 miles and still have 'release compound' on the tire when you commit to a full-lean corner. I ride around the neighborhood turning back and forth at low speed to get the tire in contact with the road while not at a 'full commit' speed. I mean low speed while almost scraping toes. A few trips around the block has always worked for me. I'm sure I look like a tool, but I've never had a new tire slide on me when I head out for "full-goose bozo". :)
Do they still use mold release on the tread part of the mold? I thought that was only on the side of the molds and the area of the mold that comes in contact with the tread is coated with teflon. In any case, it can't hurt to take it easy for the first 50-100 miles or so until you get the feel of the tires handling characteristics. :)
 

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Mr Leakered
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Every tire I used up to my current few sets of Pirrelli Angels including other Pirrelli tires felt a bit squirrelly for a while. 100mi or so. The Angels were surprising as they felt hooked up from the first ride.

So, it depends on how it feels. I'd never go full tilt on a 0mi tire.

Have a good one.
 

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It has been a while but, I was told to break in tires “properly” (Conti grey stripes in the late 70’s) is to run the first 50 miles on a new tire at the pressure you think that you will be running them at and to stay under 50 mph until the 50 miles is reached. It may have changed. It could be B.S. I have done this for a long time and never had any problems with tires.
 

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Do they still use mold release on the tread part of the mold?
No.

I thought that was only on the side of the molds and the area of the mold that comes in contact with the tread is coated with teflon.
Yes

From 2008 Sport rider article by Lance Holst
"Few aspects of riding technique are as clouded with the dark specter of myths, old information-or just plain bad information-than how to warm up new tires. In fact, many of us, me included, still use the misleading terminology of "scrubbing" in new tires, which wrongly implies that the surface of the tire itself needs to be scrubbed or abraded to offer traction. While this may have been the case long ago when manufacturers used a mold release compound, it most definitely is not the case today."
How To Properly Warm Up Your Tires - Sport Rider Magazine

Note 2008 is a while ago now and tires will have improved from that point.

It's very common to be at a race or track day and have new tires, fit and get right out there.

That info from Dunlop has one key line "This will permit the rider to become accustomed to the feel of the new tires or tire combination" - Not that it does not say anything about the mechanical properties of the tire.
 

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No.



Yes

From 2008 Sport rider article by Lance Holst
"Few aspects of riding technique are as clouded with the dark specter of myths, old information-or just plain bad information-than how to warm up new tires. In fact, many of us, me included, still use the misleading terminology of "scrubbing" in new tires, which wrongly implies that the surface of the tire itself needs to be scrubbed or abraded to offer traction. While this may have been the case long ago when manufacturers used a mold release compound, it most definitely is not the case today."
How To Properly Warm Up Your Tires - Sport Rider Magazine

Note 2008 is a while ago now and tires will have improved from that point.

It's very common to be at a race or track day and have new tires, fit and get right out there.

That info from Dunlop has one key line "This will permit the rider to become accustomed to the feel of the new tires or tire combination" - Not that it does not say anything about the mechanical properties of the tire.
Thanks Yuu, that's more along the lines of what heard, but the Dunlap advise seemed to be a good source.
For my situation this weekend, new tires, different brand tire and a cold track, I'll definitely be taking it easy the first session or two, scrubbing or not.
 

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Cant fault you for taking it easy on cold tires/pavement. The last track day here started in the 40s and there was a good object lesson in the pits when a guy spun his rear tire out from under himself at about 6 mph and flopped over.

On days like that it's going to be about impossible to get the tires really up to temp. Got mine to luke warm and that was about it.
 

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Cant fault you for taking it easy on cold tires...a guy spun his rear tire out from under himself at about 6 mph and flopped over...
Not this guy I know, but still a good example of why it's not a bad idea to take it easy on new tires: (poor guy, this video has probably seen more air time than "the agony of defeat" ski jumper)

 

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The guy at the track managed a near 180. He make a couple other key errors too though. It was 6:30am, so the pavement was COLD. This paddock area has a skid pad - which he was on a section of. The pad has been rubbed smooth enough that you can shuffle slide sneakers across it w/o much issue when cold. He probably wasn't much better off than being on glazed pavement.

Respecting the tires, road conditions, including temp is always wise. But gone are the days of super slippy new tires coated in release agents.

Oh, and don't weave with the notion of putting heat in your tires - it doesn't do much at all. Strong acceleration and brake cycles will to a lot more to deform the tire, which creates heat.
 

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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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Not this guy I know, but still a good example of why it's not a bad idea to take it easy on new tires: (poor guy, this video has probably seen more air time than "the agony of defeat" ski jumper)

Brand new Gixxer crashed - YouTube
He seriously needed a throttle lock to keep it from closing all the way! :eek:
 
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