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Can you put the Tin type coating on any type of forks ? for example can you take a set of stock superbike forks and have them coated like a set of ohlins forks....yes I know " why not just buy a set of ohlins forks " well I was hoping to have something different then the traditional " gold " coating...

anyone ?
 

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Check places that make carbide and high speed steel cutting tools. They plate those tools with Titanium Nitride coatings, and there are also a couple of other coatings also that might protect, and make for a more slippery surface. They might be willing to stick a set of fork legs in the box for the next shipment to the platers for a nominal fee. Or check with platers/anodizers/coating specialists in your area.

Check these guys out.

http://www.brycoat.com/?gclid=CPCi58jik54CFSn6agod6Ae1oQ

These guys seem to offer different types of coatings also.
http://www.mpimetaltreating.com/coating.asp
 

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I'm confused by your request. The TiN coating is the "traditional gold coating" you see on Ohlins, etc.
Are you looking for something else?
TiN coating can also be black or multi colored(older montesa trials bikes come to mind)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Confirm

I am looking to the have to benefit of the TIN coating " or some other similar coating " however I dont want the traditional " what everyone and there dog has " gold coating that you see on the Ohlins.

Is Anodizing an option for the fork tubes, instead of TIN coating ?

thanks for all the input guys...

Cheers
 

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The sliders are usually coated in Diamond-like Carbon (DLC), Titanium Nitride, or Hard Chrome. This goes from least to greater stiction.

DLC is glossy black, TiN is shiny yellow, and Chrome is what you expect.

As for the fork uppers (legs), you can get them anodized any number of colors. From red, to green, to gold, purple, black. Anodizing will fade over time, and some folks opt to powder-coat the fork legs instead.
 

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So...

You are talking about the inner stanchion tube, right? The polished, smooth part of the fork?

Well, you can always go with a DLC coating, which is black, such as the forks on the Hypermotard S.

If you want another color, I guess Kaos will have to tell you where to get it, because I've never heard of a TiN coating that wasn't gold in color...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Cool

Thats some good info my friend....

I always assumed that the TIN coating gave the best performance...I take it the DLC coating of course would be harder to do ? usually the best of something normally costs the most LOL

Cheers
 

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DLC is amazing stuff. 10-20 times less stiction and up to 4000 times as wear resistant than bare polished steel.
 

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Black low-stiction coating

Thats some good info my friend....

I always assumed that the TIN coating gave the best performance...I take it the DLC coating of course would be harder to do ? usually the best of something normally costs the most LOL

Cheers

Hi there,

I had my 996 donor lower tubes mated to standard ST3 uppers, when adding the 996 compression/rebound damping adjustment capability. I was originally going for the TiN coating, but was told that the "techlube" black coating gave lower stiction. This is probably the DLC referred to in this thread. It may also be called Titanium Aluminium Nitrate, but I am happy to be corrected and I'll call it DLC for brevity. :eek:

One of my considerations was that black would look better on my silver bike than gold, but I also liked the higher performance. It didn't come cheap as it cost me A$600 for the two legs to be coated. Can't recall the price for TiN but I think it was more like A$450.

Here's a pic of the finished product: http://www.ducati.ms/gallery/files/3/0/4/8/4/lower_fork___side_view_1___sml.jpg

Dave
 

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When I had my forks built up with new internals, radial brakes etc I wanted the chrome tubes Tin plating, when I looked into it it was not much more expensive to replace the tubes with new Tin plated tubes and it saved some labour by not having to mess with removing the old caliper mounts etc.

I then recouped some of the cost by selling my stock tubes with brake mounts on fleabay.

Overall it still cost slightly more than plating but was done quicker and I have peace of mind of new parts.
 

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So...

You are talking about the inner stanchion tube, right? The polished, smooth part of the fork?

Well, you can always go with a DLC coating, which is black, such as the forks on the Hypermotard S.

If you want another color, I guess Kaos will have to tell you where to get it, because I've never heard of a TiN coating that wasn't gold in color...
the new montesa 4rt has a black coating called titainium nitrate on its forks,the older was a blue -purple .perhaps the montesa doesn't know what its really called .of course the quotes i've read are for over $500 to get anti friction coatings applied,making used xerox forks possibly the more sensible choice http://montesa.trials.com.au/2009_4RT.html
 

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There are many PVD coatings available including several variants of DLC and TiN.

Colors are usually options as well. A good coating shop can do amazing things. I had DLC done in purple/blue - looked cool. ProCircuit use to spec a green color for their team bikes. Factory Showa works parts use to spec blue for road race parts.

It's all just very thin coatings over chrome or polished surfaces. Big difference between each is how slippery it is, how it is put on and at what temperature of heat is required. Many tool bits and molds are treated this way.

You can get many different treatments. I've seen red tinted TiN.
 
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