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Discussion Starter #1
I need a solution for tying down the front of my PP to my trailer, with the hand guards my Cycle Cynch will obviously not work on the grips. What have you Multi owner's used for tie downs? I was thinking of using a soft tie extension around the grips and then regular tie down straps.

First time trailering this motorcycle and I don't really want to have a failure or learn a lesson the hard way. So if those of you who have trailered your Multi what are you using? Also I need to replace all of my tie down straps what brand or type seems to be working well for you?

Thanks,
 

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Never trailered a multi, but I have trailered a GT, 999, Panigale, and a BMW R9T.

First thing I'd recommend is some soft hook extensions like this http://a.co/1KyW3SA for the handle bar.

I use ancra straps. Some folks like the cam lock, some like the ratchet (I use both). The benefit of the cam lock is that they can release gradually. The down side is they are a little harder to tension. Do you have a wheel chock on your trailer? That's prob the #1 thing safety & security wise.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Slowdive,

Thanks for your response, exactly what I was thinking I needed to do. I have Ancra original tie down straps and I use Ancra extensions when trailering my ST3S. My trailer is a Yacht Club three place trailer with trays that are angled at the front which help hold and center the wheel.

I may try the Ancra gradual release tie downs. I was not sure of the brand name of the tie down straps I have so I appreciated you giving me the Amazon link which showed the ones I have now.
 

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I had someone make me some tire rails out of angle iron that I bolted to the floor of my trailer. I attach a strap to each side of the mulit's frame that run to eyelets I put on the trailer side rails. Both wheels are held firmly in place with rubber straps secured to eyelets on the floor of the trailer. It takes me about two minutes to secure any bike to my trailer, with minimal load on the suspension. I rarely trailer bikes, but if one does, it makes sense to have a good setup and not just wing it.
 

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+1 on soft ties around the bottom triple. Use cam locks and rock the bike side to side as you pull to help tighten. Do not over tighten


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Same here after much research soft ties up front on the lower triple clamp and regular on back just to keep it from bounce side to side, donut go too much and end or break the passenger pegs.



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Does anyone know if you have to turn on the multi while tying down if it has dss?

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DSS does need to be turned on while tying down. Went on a trip with a buddy who has a MS with DSS and he always made sure to have the ignition on while we were cinching the bike down.

Like everyone else here, soft ties around the lower triple was the way to tie down the front end on his bike. I use Baxley roll in chocks in my truck bed or Condor e-track roll in chocks on my trailer to minimize the amount of pressure needed to tie the front end down. Pitbull trailer restraints are the best system I've seen for easy secure low pressure tie down, but the system is too bike specific to make sense if you need to haul allot of different bikes.
 

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I never started mine the 3 times I did it. No ill effects...


I've hauled mine a few times (about 100 or so miles each way) and have never turned it on except when I rode it up the trailer ramp into my condor. I then shut it off and started tying things down.


I use canyon dancers to tie mine down (the ones I specifically use have cups that fit over the ends of the bars so it may not work for you but you mentioned tie straps around the grips) and I put a second set through either the foot pegs or the support bracket for the top case.
 

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I use canyon dancers to tie mine down (the ones I specifically use have cups that fit over the ends of the bars so it may not work for you but you mentioned tie straps around the grips) and I put a second set through either the foot pegs or the support bracket for the top case.
I used one (canyon dancer)to bring my Multi home when I bought it, I'll never do it again. To get the bike tight I felt like I had to flex the bars too much. I'd advise anyone thinking about it to be careful, you'll see exactly why I express concern when you start compressing forks.
P230516_16.18.jpg
 

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I used one (canyon dancer)to bring my Multi home when I bought it, I'll never do it again. To get the bike tight I felt like I had to flex the bars too much. I'd advise anyone thinking about it to be careful, you'll see exactly why I express concern when you start compressing forks.
View attachment 769506


I've used them on multiple bikes and never an issue but you can over stress the bars if you tighten them too much. You can damage anything if you throw caution to the wind.
 

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As said..
1. Ratched tiedowns over the bottom triple tree and forward/out to side so it clears bodywork. Compress forks about halfway. No need to turn DSS on, the flow is very very slow during tiedown and nothing needs to move. Dont adjust springrate.
2. From the rear passenger footpegs or subframe back, down and out to sides for stability. Compress rear suspension about 1/3 of remaining travel. No need to adjust springrate or turn on DSS. As before the cpemreesion speed is extremly low, so nothing is affected.
3. Safety! - If using an open trailer, Use a single ratchetstrap from the rearwheel straight back. If your in a collision, this will keep the bike from flying forward.

Check
1. Key in pocket
2. Gear in NEUTRAL
3. A rubberband/similar around the frontbrake -> throttle grip is a very effective parking brake.
 

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If you have a small not wide covered trailer (Lucky You!) Put the front loops on the forks before you load the bike [Careful not to wrap any cables wires] Difficult to get in there without turning the handle bars if already loaded....

Buy rated loops/chockers with the intent that that one choker may incur all the weight force of the bike if things get hairy on the road... Then good insurance will take over.
Be smart and pull over after a few miles bumps and check your rigging,
Circle your "rig" Like professional Truckers , looking for all to be hooked up and proper for the road.
I went for hours without hooking up the trailer lights, must have peeved off some people I sharing the road with.
 

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All good info here.

+1 on the soft-tie loops. Pit-Bull Trailer Restraint is the business if you really want to get serious.
 
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