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Discussion Starter #1
I've been reading the forums to find a cure for my screeching (chewbacca)clutch noise:
I did take my plates out, clean with brake cleaner and replace EXACTLY as they came out but as I have no real clue on what I am doing, was scared shitless to change things around for fear of damanging the bike. Didn't get rd of the noise anyway once it was hot.

Anyhoo I have some other general knowledge questions on the clutch and I'm hoping the enlightened amongst you can answer and provide wisdom:


1) as long as I keep the sequence of the plates the same, can I swap the plates position keeping like for like or turn them around? i.e swap a friction plate from the front to the back or just turn the plate around?

2) If I do any of these above, will it improve anything, generally speaking?

3) The pressure plate has 6 springs, if I remove any springs, will it reduce the pressure on the clutch lever and make it easier to use?

4) The lever engages the clutch at the end of the throw, literally no way to "drag" the clutch when pulling away from a stop. (almost broke my hand the other day when the damn bike lept away from me) Is using a progressive pressure plate the best option to cure this or is there another method?
 

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I have a '12 HYM 1100 Evo SP and the clutch is kind of noisy on it too, but I think that's normal for the dry clutch. I wouldn't mess with the clutch pack just for the noise problem since noise is pretty common on the dry clutch set up. As far as your clutch engagement point goes, take a good look at your clutch lever and you'll see that you can adjust the plunger/pin on the handle so that it engages the clutch sooner (at least on my '12 model it is adjustable). I had the same problem on my bike when it was new. The factory setting has the clutch engage at almost the fully released position. Why? Who knows. Loosen the tiny set screw in the middle of the drum that holds the plunger pin. You can then turn the plunger pin back into the drum (i.e shorten it) to adjust the engagement point. Don't turn it all the way in or it will lock up the pivoting action of the drum. I turned it in all the way and then backed it out about a full turn. Works great now. Just make sure the drum still moves around freely when done. The tough part is finding a hex wrench small enough to loosen the set screw. You can also adjust your clutch handle pull distance with the cam adjuster on the clutch handle itself (BTW there's also one on the front brake lever too). Otherwise, if it's still too stiff, you can replace the slave cylinder with a larger aftermarket unit to decrease the pull effort. I think the pull is liveable once you have all the available adjustments dialed in just right. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
good feedback thanks.

The std clutch noise is no issue, its the "chewbacca" noise (search the forum for chewbacca and you'll know what I'm on about). I've adjusted the lever using the cam as suggested but the small drum screw is new. where is this?
 

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answers inline, below....

I've been reading the forums to find a cure for my screeching (chewbacca)clutch noise:
I did take my plates out, clean with brake cleaner and replace EXACTLY as they came out but as I have no real clue on what I am doing, was scared shitless to change things around for fear of damanging the bike. Didn't get rd of the noise anyway once it was hot.

Anyhoo I have some other general knowledge questions on the clutch and I'm hoping the enlightened amongst you can answer and provide wisdom:

1) as long as I keep the sequence of the plates the same, can I swap the plates position keeping like for like or turn them around? i.e swap a friction plate from the front to the back or just turn the plate around?
yes. as long as you keep the order the same (e.g.: friction, drive, friction, drive, etc...), all is good.

2) If I do any of these above, will it improve anything, generally speaking?
you "might" get rid of any squeaking that the plates create on engagement.

3) The pressure plate has 6 springs, if I remove any springs, will it reduce the pressure on the clutch lever and make it easier to use?
yes... i know folks who have removed two springs, and the lever pull is reduced greatly. just remove from opposite sides, so as to keep pressure equal.

4) The lever engages the clutch at the end of the throw, literally no way to "drag" the clutch when pulling away from a stop. (almost broke my hand the other day when the damn bike lept away from me) Is using a progressive pressure plate the best option to cure this or is there another method?
you can adjust the engagement of the clutch at the master cylinder (at least on an 1100 hyper), as there is a pin with an allen screw, that when loosened, you can use an open ended wrench to adjust the push pin in or out, to adjust engagement of the master cylinder. i'll try and locate the shop manual illustration that shows this, and post up if i can find it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ah, superb response, thank you :yeah:
 

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good feedback thanks.

The std clutch noise is no issue, its the "chewbacca" noise (search the forum for chewbacca and you'll know what I'm on about). I've adjusted the lever using the cam as suggested but the small drum screw is new. where is this?
Look at the plunger pin that goes into the master cylinder as you squeeze the clutch lever. Trace it back and you will see the drum that the pin is screwed into. In the center of the drum is the set screw holding the pin from turning. loosen it and then you can turn the pin.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ok, I give in, where is this damn adjuster screw? is it on the handlebars or down at the engine side?
Pictures would help :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
found it, damn thats a tiny hex wrench (but I got one that size so lets start playing)
 

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I heard that an open cover would reduce the likelihood of Chewbacca noises. I also cleaned my plates and frictions with brake cleaner when I replaced the pp, springs, and retainers. The noise is gone and hasn't come back.

Sent from my SGH-I997 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #14
all, so now I found the adjuster screw on the clutch whatsit, what do i do now?:confused:
 

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The noise is caused by vibration of the plates when the clutch begins to take on the load. Dirt and dust from operation will tend to induce more noise and/or change the frequency range.

Both my Ducatis do it just a bit when feeding in the clutch pretty quickly at take-off. A harder launch equals a louder noise at a lower frequency. You can spend lots of time, money, and energy to try and eliminate the sounds of basic physics at work, but all you're doing by eliminating the noise is to move it into a frequency range that you can't hear. You can't defeat physics, only work within the parameters...
 

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all, so now I found the adjuster screw on the clutch whatsit, what do i do now?:confused:
Remove the tiny set screw. Then turn the adjuster pin in towards the drum and away from the master cylinder. This shortens the overall length of the pin and the clutch will engage quicker. Don't screw the pin all the way into the drum or it will bind up the drum's pivoting action. I turned it in all the way and then backed it out about 1 full turn. Check if the drum still moves around easily after you are done and it should be good. Don't forget the set screw too. Then go test it out and you'll see the difference with the engagement point right away. Good luck!
 
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