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Discussion Starter #1
My PS died promptly (no sputtering and then dying, just a very sudden/instant stop of the motor) yesterday right before I was about to get it into a parking spot on campus. At first I thought I had pushed my kick stand down or run out of gas or something stupid like that. Upon closer inspection (ie trying to start it up again), it would not start up again. The lights and dash are getting power and I can hear the fuel pump making its usual noises when I turn the key to 'on'. You can hear the motor turning but it will not start. Luckily, a friend of mine with a truck and a ramp wasn't too far away and we got it back to my apartment (I wouldn't want to leave a bicycle on campus over night, much less my PS). Today, I pulled a plug and pressed the ignition button just to see if it was actually getting a spark, and it is, so that's good; I guess (and hope) I can rule out the ignition system. I've read about the fuel line issue with these bikes, but am thinking it isn't that on account of the sudden failure rather than a sputtering, slow failure, however, I am not ruling that out. The bike has about 7400 miles on it and I would have expected the fuel line issue to have manifested earlier on in the bike's life, but perhaps that is a false assumption to make.

Any ideas as to what might be the problem? I did some research before posting, but only came up with fuel system issues. If it is a defective fuel system, isn't that covered by ducati even after the warranty period has expired?


Thanks in advance,
Josh
 

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unM0derator
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Check the voltage regulator. They can overheat and fry themselves. If it is the hoses in the tank, that was fixed in a recall, and your dealer should come to your place to fix it if you can't get the bike to them.
 

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Josh,

If you have eliminated the ignition and you can hear the pump, then the fuel problem could still be the case. Check hoses inside tank for splitting. Might as well have a fuel filter handy to change will you're in there, regardless. This was more common on older Ducatis (pre-5AM ECU). I would look for other posts for more things to try that are less intrusive before digging in. Have some spare o-rings for the fuel line quick connectors handy, as they don't "re-use" well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Check the voltage regulator. They can overheat and fry themselves.
Sorry, I forgot to mention that I checked all the electronics under the seat, including the voltage regulator, and all the wires coming out of it looked okay. Is there a way other than observing fried wires to tell if it is done for?
 

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Check the fuel hose in the tank.... Mine went out....it was sudden..luckily it happened at the Ducati dealership when they were tuning the bike after the zards were installed...it just cut out....

There is a recall on that hose...
 

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Sorry, I forgot to mention that I checked all the electronics under the seat, including the voltage regulator, and all the wires coming out of it looked okay. Is there a way other than observing fried wires to tell if it is done for?
It's difficult to check if the bike won't run, since the R&R needs AC current to function. You should be able to see a drop in output voltage when running if the part is bad. Also getting hot is another indicator of failure.
 

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booyakasha!
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I vote for voltage regulator.

The regulator doesn't have to have burnt/friedwires for it to fail. Both of my failed regulators had the wires looking normal.

The warranty will cover it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I vote for voltage regulator.

The regulator doesn't have to have burnt/friedwires for it to fail. Both of my failed regulators had the wires looking normal.

The warranty will cover it.
I'm out of the warranty period. Would this be something ducati replaces out of the kindness of their heart, even after the warranty has expired (ie a recalled item)? If not, and I'm guessing that's the case, how much is a new regulator?
 

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My voltage regulator/rectifier went bad at about 5500 miles on my PS. It too was out of warranty. I went to Ducati and there was no kindness in their heart, just cash in my pocket. About $120 that is. My regulator was fully intact without any burning or fried wires.
When mine went bad I thought it was just the battery. I charged it up and it fired right up in the morning. It died on me when I went on a short ride around the neighborhood. I charged it up again and it started right up again. This time I got a voltmeter and the battery was definately getting drained. I don't remember the reading, but I know it wasn't the 14.5 (+ or - 0.5)volts that it was supposed to be reading with a correctly working regulator at about 3000rpm.
Needless to say I got a new regulator and relocated it to hopefully avert another fried R/R.
 

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If the bike has power and is putting out a spark then surely it isn't the R/R. The starter turns over the bike and the plugs are firing - that means fuel is the problem - doesn't it?

Basically, spark + fuel + compression = go

Sudden failure and no other scary noises, but with electrics intact (lights, starter, spark) suggests a fuel problem.

Cheers,

Brett
 

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I think it is the fuel line. Maybe not the infamous clamp, but a small crack in the line inside the tank. Timdog experienced that. Almost impossible to find.
 

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Fuel

Pretty good chance the battery would have went dead, if it was the regulator, I would look in the tank for a hose problem. any drop in fuel pressure, they won't start:(
 

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Discussion Starter #13
checking the fuel line

wow, thanks for so all the useful responses folks. so if my electronics (dash, lights, sparkplug, fuel pump) are getting juice, the voltage regulator can be ruled out, am i correctly understanding this?


at the risk of sounding like a mechical newb (which i am, so i wont be ashamed), how do you get inside the fuel tank to check the fuel lines for cracks? this seems like it could require some special tools and/or be messy. do i need to siphon the fuel out of my tank first?


thanks again,
josh
 

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booyakasha!
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If the bike has power and is putting out a spark then surely it isn't the R/R. The starter turns over the bike and the plugs are firing - that means fuel is the problem - doesn't it?

Basically, spark + fuel + compression = go

Sudden failure and no other scary noises, but with electrics intact (lights, starter, spark) suggests a fuel problem.

Cheers,

Brett
When the R/R fails, there's always a bit of juice left in the battery to power on the instrument panel, a bright headlight, create a spark, and the fuel pump. However, it will not turn the crankshaft over and fire up the engine. There isn't a enough juice for that. All you hear is a click or series of clicks.

Your battery is severely drained because it was running without charging.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
When the R/R fails, there's always a bit of juice left in the battery to power on the instrument panel, a bright headlight, create a spark, and the fuel pump. However, it will not turn the crankshaft over and fire up the engine. There isn't a enough juice for that. All you hear is a click or series of clicks.

Your battery is severely drained because it was running without charging.
When I checked for spark and removed a plug, I could feel air being pushed out of the spark plug hole, suggesting that the engine is turning over (also, the clutch plate is turning). I'm starting to think this has to be related to the fuel system messing up. After class todya, I'm going to pull up the gas tank and check it for any loose bits or cracks in hoses. Wouldn't fuel have to be pouring out onto the bike if loose or cracked hoses were the cause?

- Josh
 

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booyakasha!
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When I checked for spark and removed a plug, I could feel air being pushed out of the spark plug hole, suggesting that the engine is turning over (also, the clutch plate is turning). I'm starting to think this has to be related to the fuel system messing up. After class todya, I'm going to pull up the gas tank and check it for any loose bits or cracks in hoses. Wouldn't fuel have to be pouring out onto the bike if loose or cracked hoses were the cause?

- Josh
So if the motor is turning over (as normal), then I'd start taking a look at the fuel lines.

If there was a major leak, the tank would be empty. You might have caught on fire! :eek:
 

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No, you misunderstand. The fuel line problem that occurs most often is a failure inside the tank. Thus, the "leakage" is from inside the fuel line back into the fuel tank.

Finding and curing that problem requires pulling the fuel pump out of the bottom of the tank and dealing with the lines that live inside the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
No, you misunderstand. The fuel line problem that occurs most often is a failure inside the tank. Thus, the "leakage" is from inside the fuel line back into the fuel tank.

Finding and curing that problem requires pulling the fuel pump out of the bottom of the tank and dealing with the lines that live inside the tank.
So I spoke with Timdog about this matter and got some good tips on checking the internal fuel line. I just finished pulling out my fuel pump and filter (quite scary pulling all that stuff out for the first time ever...felt like I was assisting in a birth) out of the tank and inspected the fuel line that goes from the filter to the pump (which is about 10 inches long or so, black and ribbed) and saw no cracks in it. It's dark outside, I don't have a garage, and I need to go eat some food so I can get the gasoline taste out of my mouth from siphoning, but I'll inspect the internal fuel line again tomorrow.

Thanks again everyone,
Josh
 

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The bike has about 7400 miles on it and I would have expected the fuel line issue to have manifested earlier on in the bike's life, but perhaps that is a false assumption to make.
My bike had 8200 on it when the fuel line clamp popped off, it's always worth checking out.
 
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