Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been stretching and exercising the hell out of my neck so I can ride my 06 800 SS a bit longer. Seems to be working.

Even so, taking the SS out for an all day ride is quite the exertion. On the way home the other day I hit 90 mph on a local stretch of 2-lane, and holy moly, everything was suddenly perfect.

I should have checked the wind direction, since that can make a difference, but I'll tell you, the wind blast suspended my big ol' body and suddenly I could relax my back, relax my abs, relax my shoulders, and simply let my arms hang down like a praying mantis over the bars. It was heaven.

Of course I couldn't keep it up for long because The Law disagrees with my interpretation of "Freedom," and The Law is more powerful than little old me. But for those few seconds, Nirvana.

ape
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
684 Posts
so true.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,563 Posts
I find the SS is really comfortable at about 80 mph, but those speeds are aided by a taller windscreen (Zero Gravity in my case) and slightly taller bar risers (Ferraci). We bought sport bikes, not cruisers, so feeling better at faster speeds is expected. I used to have a 748R as well, which goaded me on to even higher speeds on public highways, which is why I spent quite a few weekends with that machine on the track (to keep my license).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I find the SS is really comfortable at about 80 mph, but those speeds are aided by a taller windscreen (Zero Gravity in my case) and slightly taller bar risers (Ferraci). ...
I contacted Fast by Ferraci and the old man himself told me he had no bar risers to fit the 06 800SS. He said the fairing was different that year.

I haven't been able to find any others that fit my 06.

But I've been getting a little more used to the riding position.

ape
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
For me, it's never been a question of my own comfort or safety. I find that my '93 runs at its torque peak, and therefore greatest efficiency, at about 110 mph in sixth gear. I feel as though it is my responsibility to operate it at peak efficiency whenever possible, thereby reducing harmful greenhouse gas emissions. It runs far "greener" that way. I've always been willing to sacrifice my comfort and safety for the greater good; I'm funny that way. You are all welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
Welcome to the world of sportbikes my friend.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
For me, it's never been a question of my own comfort or safety. I find that my '93 runs at its torque peak, and therefore greatest efficiency, at about 110 mph in sixth gear. I feel as though it is my responsibility to operate it at peak efficiency whenever possible, thereby reducing harmful greenhouse gas emissions. It runs far "greener" that way. I've always been willing to sacrifice my comfort and safety for the greater good; I'm funny that way. You are all welcome.
I might have seen you as I passed at 111mph :)
 

·
I have a button.. BITCHES!
Joined
·
8,971 Posts
05 800ss. My bike is sweet at 60-70 mph, at about 7K rpm's, in third gear, on short little stretches of straightaways, between 20-30 mph twisty curves here in the mountains of SC. Nice thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
80-90 is the sweet spot for my bike. Running a 43 sprocket out back and a Zero Gravity double bubble screen with a NEXX X30 helmet.. Everything just Gels right there and I could run all day.... Unless the freeway gets really bumpy (405 nearing Irvine spectrum) The suspension just doesn't like that part of the road for a few miles..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
For me, it's never been a question of my own comfort or safety. I find that my '93 runs at its torque peak, and therefore greatest efficiency, at about 110 mph in sixth gear. I feel as though it is my responsibility to operate it at peak efficiency whenever possible, thereby reducing harmful greenhouse gas emissions. It runs far "greener" that way. I've always been willing to sacrifice my comfort and safety for the greater good; I'm funny that way. You are all welcome.
Higgy, my children and future grandchildren are forever in your debt. You are a stalwart guardian of the planet they will inherit.

I'm going to print out your speech and hope that next time I get stopped, it's a cop who really, really cares about climate change. :)

Welcome to the world of sportbikes my friend.:D
VTGPDUC, thank you. I rode the sportbikes of friends on occasion throughout the years and even owned a Bemmer sport-tourer (K1200RS) for a riding season, but I never fell in love with sportbikes until I rode a Ducati. Now I'm out of my mind.

ape
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,802 Posts
80-90 is the sweet spot for my bike. Running a 43 sprocket out back and a Zero Gravity double bubble screen with a NEXX X30 helmet.. Everything just Gels right there and I could run all day.... Unless the freeway gets really bumpy (405 nearing Irvine spectrum) The suspension just doesn't like that part of the road for a few miles..
Haven't tried the 5 near San Juan Capistrano yet have you? A kidney nightmare on almost any bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I contacted Fast by Ferraci and the old man himself told me he had no bar risers to fit the 06 800SS. He said the fairing was different that year.

I haven't been able to find any others that fit my 06.

But I've been getting a little more used to the riding position.

ape
Far be it for me to contrafdict Mr. Ferraci, but I own a '00 750SS, a '03 800SS, a '05 800SS, and a '06 1000SS, and I recently sold a '03 620 Sport. All used the same fairing upper (there are half faired and full faired versions) from 1999-2007; the front fairing support bracket was changed in 2002 when the 750/900 were superceded by the 800/1000; but in my experience any bars that fit any 1999-2007 Ducati Sport or SuperSport should fit any other.

Currently I run stock bars on my 750SS street bike, but I am about to switch them out for Woodcraft CFM clip-ons that; while giving no additional rise, have a completely different (and for me, much more comfortable) bar angle than the stock clip-ons.

Also, CFM is now offering the clip-on clamps (perches) in incrementally raised heights:

http://www.woodcraft-cfm.com/Scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=12937

Allowing low (no rise; these are what I currently have on my two race bikes and my trackbike; they fit with no modification at all) medium (1.5" rise) and high (2.0" rise) clip-ons for 50mm fork legs. I plan to try the high rise clip-ons on my street bike. I anticipate having to relocate the brake and clutch master cylinder fluid reservoirs, at least. If I can't make the 2.0 inch rise clamps work, I'll try the 1.5-inch rise model.

This item: http://www.woodcraft-cfm.com/Scripts/prodView.asp?idproduct=18105 might make the project a little easier.

Good luck. I recently compared the riding position of my (stock ergos) 2000 750SS with my buddy's 996SPS, and we both agreed that the supersport had a more radical racing crouch than the superbike!

Tim
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top