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I can remember you talking about your old SS before, my memory is still holding out okay, that was a very nice bike and that hp figures are impressive.

I'm sure that the new SS will be a very good bike for most of those over here in the know that will buy it, don't mind us haters too much.
 

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Bon Vivant
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The pointy enclosed stubby tail section on the new SS does kinda bear a striking resemblance to the one used on the KTM RC8.

When I saw the rear 3/4 view picture that was the first thought that came to mind. I knew I'd seen that somewhere before.
yeah you know you're right - If I drink about 8 pints of beer and stand way back, and squint, it does kinda look like the KTM.... not. :surprise:
 

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Bon Vivant
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I just find it amazing that you guys can be bitching about this beautiful new bike Ducati has introduced (especially since none of us have seen it in person)

And you guys are the owners of IMHO one of the ugliest Ducatis ever penned - I mean seriously guys you are comparing this sleek new SS to this:
I';m sorry if thats where you guys are coming from I can't take anything you say seriously...
 

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Big air cooled mill would be a game changer. So much heart and soul missing without it
If you want big and air cooled then you should probably buy a Hardley!

Personally I just don't get physically big bikes, and they have to be to take a big engine. I like my 900SS and 748 because they are compact, relatively simple and light. Big bikes are not light!
 

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I just find it amazing that you guys can be bitching about this beautiful new bike Ducati has introduced (especially since none of us have seen it in person)

And you guys are the owners of IMHO one of the ugliest Ducatis ever penned - I mean seriously guys you are comparing this sleek new SS to this:
I';m sorry if thats where you guys are coming from I can't take anything you say seriously...
OK, dog, I will disagree with you on this. Maybe the 1999-2007 SS wasn't the pinnacle of Ducati design expertise, but it wasn't the disaster you portray either. I didn't like the "rubber ducky" at the rear of the fuel tank and the excess design lines in the fairing, but I remedied all that on my bike. When I finished the reworks I liked the machine enough to keep it in my stable for 15 years.
 

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I'm all for simplicity but I also try to live in the present. I used to ride two strokes, but they reached their limit. I'm nostalgic, but I've moved on. I'd like to see an SS that is comfortable and has some ST in it to make it a practical commuter. KTM's look as if they were drawn with a ruler and finger painted in kindergarten.
 

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I'm all for simplicity but I also try to live in the present. I used to ride two strokes, but they reached their limit. I'm nostalgic, but I've moved on. I'd like to see an SS that is comfortable and has some ST in it to make it a practical commuter. KTM's look as if they were drawn with a ruler and finger painted in kindergarten.
I agree, but I think this new SS is more "Sport" than "Touring". I hope there are storage accessories available for this machine.
 

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IMO, ABS isn't worth the weight complication, and expense on a road going sport bike
ABS is the biggest safety advance in motorcycling since the tubeless tire. Now that it's been around long enough to start looking at data, we're seeing that ABS prevents about 40% of fatal crashes from happening. That's worth a bit of complication and expense. Ride modes, I can easily do without. Traction control, other electronic gubbins, I have no need. ABS, though, is a big plus, and whenever/whatever I end up replacing my M900 with, ABS will be included.

PhilB
 

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And you guys are the owners of IMHO one of the ugliest Ducatis ever penned - I mean seriously guys you are comparing this sleek new SS to this:
Just hold it there now buster, please just stop it.

Thing is, we always knew that our little SS's were the ugly duclings, Ducati's step child, the raggy kid in the corner, never pretended it to be anything else....., we still loved them dearly, cared for them, because they were proper Ducati's....., and they sounded like nothing else.

Here's a little irony for you, people are still buying the old SSie, and the carby became somewhat of a sought after item, this is after what, 17-25 years, can anybody see this new SS still being relevant after 17-25 years time?

Before this new SS the old SSie was known as the little ugly one, after this new SS it will be remembered as the last great Ducati Supersport.
 

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Bon Vivant
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Just hold it there now buster, please just stop it.

Thing is, we always knew that our little SS's were the ugly duclings, Ducati's step child, the raggy kid in the corner, never pretended it to be anything else....., we still loved them dearly, cared for them, because they were proper Ducati's....., and they sounded like nothing else.

Here's a little irony for you, people are still buying the old SSie, and the carby became somewhat of a sought after item, this is after what, 17-25 years, can anybody see this new SS still being relevant after 17-25 years time?

Before this new SS the old SSie was known as the little ugly one, after this new SS it will be remembered as the last great Ducati Supersport.
You had me right up to the last sentence! This is the last great SS:



Dont get me wrong I like the generation that came after this bike - but I wouldn't call it great. The 851 styled SS is designed appropriately for its era but Terblanche jumped onto the crazy train when he drew the last gen SS. I think he was trying to emulate one of the ground breaking industrial artists of the day; Luigi Colani. The difference is Colani never actually built anything sold to the public, his concepts remained just that - inspiring concepts.
Dark Roasted Blend: Extravagant Designs by Luigi Colani
I see Colani influences in the last gen SS. (and the 999 as well)
 

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I have a 2002 900ssie Senna.

I actually bought that particular Ducati because of the design, and the controversy of the Terblanche design.

I like to have a bike that pepole have an opinion about. Good or bad.

I actually keep the bike original, in honor of the design.

Today, people not familiar with motorcycles and current models, think that the carbed Supersports look.......yes, what they are, old. I have met many people who think my 900ss ie is a new bike. Not that it makes the bike pretty, just a fun fact, for a bike design that are approaching 20 years.

It is a flamboyant design from a mad man, coupled with the soul of Ducati. It may not be pretty, but it pokes your senses and demands an opinion from you.

I like that.

The new 2017 SS bears far more resemblance with most mainstream sport bikes, and what is the interesting in that?
 

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You had me right up to the last sentence! This is the last great SS:



Dont get me wrong I like the generation that came after this bike - but I wouldn't call it great. The 851 styled SS is designed appropriately for its era but Terblanche jumped onto the crazy train when he drew the last gen SS. I think he was trying to emulate one of the ground breaking industrial artists of the day; Luigi Colani. The difference is Colani never actually built anything sold to the public, his concepts remained just that - inspiring concepts.
Dark Roasted Blend: Extravagant Designs by Luigi Colani
I see Colani influences in the last gen SS. (and the 999 as well)
That first-gen SS is the '70s equivalent to the current Panigale, not the Supersport we're talking about. In any event, we're talking design opinions here, not fact. No mater what you think of the Terblanche SS in terms of styling, the fact it had fuel injection instead of carbs puts it in another realm entirely - carbs absolutely SUCKed versus FI.
 

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Just hold it there now buster, please just stop it.

Here's a little irony for you, people are still buying the old SSie, and the carby became somewhat of a sought after item, this is after what, 17-25 years, can anybody see this new SS still being relevant after 17-25 years time?
I will go one step further. Not only are the old SSie's selling, but resale is heating up on 749/999s and been red hot for a while on the Sport Classics. Granted, the old multi is a dog, but the Supermono has a cult following that really rounds out a nice cluster of bikes. Objectively speaking, Terblanche's Ducatis have excellent resale and continue to draw attention. I seriously doubt the post-Terblanche (post-2010) designs will age as well.


ABS is the biggest safety advance in motorcycling since the tubeless tire. Now that it's been around long enough to start looking at data, we're seeing that ABS prevents about 40% of fatal crashes from happening. That's worth a bit of complication and expense. Ride modes, I can easily do without. Traction control, other electronic gubbins, I have no need. ABS, though, is a big plus, and whenever/whatever I end up replacing my M900 with, ABS will be included.

PhilB
I like my air cooled Ducs, but was willing to forgo it **if** this new SS was up to snuff. One of the biggest draws for me is ABS (wish I could retrofit it onto all of my older bikes). But as someone else mentioned, this bike's designed is a full step below the Pani in every direction. If their goal was to hamstring the Cayman so it wouldn't complete with the 911, they succeeded all too well. This new SS looks pretty awful.

I once questioned in 2002 why anyone would ever buy a SS1000 over a 748 for the same money (and then went ahead and bought a 748). I love the 748, but now fully appreciate how tremendous of a bike the SS1000 is. But much of that was due to my under appreciation of the air cooled engine and love affair (still burns) with the 916 design (I really liked the lines of the SSie, but the 916 was/is iconic). Today, it's a totally different ballgame. No easy maintenance with the liquid cooled SS and no unique character engine. Though the SBK design is nice (it's not awe-inspiring like the 916 was), this new little brother SS is unequivocally fugly (and yes looks exactly like a Ninja 650). It will be interesting to see how well it sells.
 

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I will go one step further. Not only are the old SSie's selling, but resale is heating up on 749/999s and been red hot for a while on the Sport Classics. Granted, the old multi is a dog, but the Supermono has a cult following that really rounds out a nice cluster of bikes. Objectively speaking, Terblanche's Ducatis have excellent resale and continue to draw attention. I seriously doubt the post-Terblanche (post-2010) designs will age as well.




I like my air cooled Ducs, but was willing to forgo it **if** this new SS was up to snuff. One of the biggest draws for me is ABS (wish I could retrofit it onto all of my older bikes). But as someone else mentioned, this bike's designed is a full step below the Pani in every direction. If their goal was to hamstring the Cayman so it wouldn't complete with the 911, they succeeded all too well. This new SS looks pretty awful.

I once questioned in 2002 why anyone would ever buy a SS1000 over a 748 for the same money (and then went ahead and bought a 748). I love the 748, but now fully appreciate how tremendous of a bike the SS1000 is. But much of that was due to my under appreciation of the air cooled engine and love affair (still burns) with the 916 design (I really liked the lines of the SSie, but the 916 was/is iconic). Today, it's a totally different ballgame. No easy maintenance with the liquid cooled SS and no unique character engine. Though the SBK design is nice (it's not awe-inspiring like the 916 was), this new little brother SS is unequivocally fugly (and yes looks exactly like a Ninja 650). It will be interesting to see how well it sells.
Oh come on, doc. "Looks exactly like a Ninja 650". Have you had your eye prescription checked lately? The only part that's similar is the use of the molded-in-black piece on the fairing. Nothing else. Nothing.

All you guys who yearn for the easy-to-service days of old are in for a rude awakening - all the new bikes from every manufacturer have discovered electronics, for better or worse. The new SS is just another entry following that lead and if they didn't Ducati would be branded as "old-tech" by critics.
 

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A lot of this argument has mostly to do with what was current when whoever is speaking discovered Ducati. For me, that was the early '90's, and thus I find the bevel-drive bikes cool, but outdated, the carbie SS as the coolest and ultimate version, and the Terblanche designs (on pretty much everything except the SuperMono) as fugly.

Regardless of all that, I do think there is room for a more practical sportbike in the Ducati lineup. Ducati has already discovered that the target market for sport-tourers doesn't think of the Ducati marque, and the ST bikes (while all great machines) didn't sell very well. There is a sizeable gap right now between the unfaired/barely faired Monster and HM models, and the fully-faired and full-on sportbike Panigales.

The main thing that the new SS needs to be is more rideable in daily/road use -- better ergonomics for the real world, and some reasonable capacity to carry another person and/or some luggage. I understand that a factory soft bag option is currently expected to be available from the start, and if the bike works and sells decently, I'd expect a hard bag solution to happen, whether factory or aftermarket. That should do nicely.

As someone noted above, it is unlikely that many people will do hardcore touring 2-up with luggage on it, but the luggage should still be compatible with carrying a passenger at the same time, as that makes it a more useful bike in general. If I got one, it would be as a daily bike, and having the luggage on it would be good all the time, just for errands and groceries and carrying stuff to and from work, etc. And I would want to be able to carry a passenger whenever needed, and not have to plan for it, or to remove the luggage to do so.

It's still a sportbike, but just one that is less laser-focused, and more compatible with riding for non-sport purposes. Which is what it needs to be. Sure, you can ride a Panigale as a daily driver, but it's going to be a bit of a PITA, and require a fair bit of compromise and tolerance on the part of the rider to adapt himself to the bike's limitations for that usage; the new SS should make for a better choice for that usage.

PhilB
 

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A lot of this argument has mostly to do with what was current when whoever is speaking discovered Ducati.
Eh, with me not so much. I got my first taste of Ducati maybe around the time the first-gen multi came out (Terblanche style all the way), and I didn't end up owning a Duc until closer to 2010. From an personal aesthetics viewpoint, the 851/888/916 series of bikes is beautiful, works of art and Massimo Tamburini was a true artist. The carbed mid-90's SS's are also beautiful, and while you'd never mistake them for new due to the square headlight and snub-nosed fairing, they still stand up pretty well. I don't really like the look of the SSie "shark bite" fairing profile, but it's growing on me... however, I've always loved the 749/999 design with the over/under headlights. It's all personal preference.

Regardless of all that, I do think there is room for a more practical sportbike in the Ducati lineup. Ducati has already discovered that the target market for sport-tourers doesn't think of the Ducati marque, and the ST bikes (while all great machines) didn't sell very well. There is a sizeable gap right now between the unfaired/barely faired Monster and HM models, and the fully-faired and full-on sportbike Panigales.
Ducatis have had a rep for less-than-stellar reliablity (earned or not) which I think hurt them at the time they were trying to get into this market... that and the price of the bikes with SBK engines and horsepower. Everybody always knew Ducs were fast, and the Monster ushered in a new level of "coolness" parked in front of the coffee shop, but Ducati didn't have anything particularly novel to draw in the sport-touring crowd.

The main thing that the new SS needs to be is more rideable in daily/road use -- better ergonomics for the real world, and some reasonable capacity to carry another person and/or some luggage. I understand that a factory soft bag option is currently expected to be available from the start, and if the bike works and sells decently, I'd expect a hard bag solution to happen, whether factory or aftermarket. That should do nicely.

It's still a sportbike, but just one that is less laser-focused, and more compatible with riding for non-sport purposes. Which is what it needs to be. Sure, you can ride a Panigale as a daily driver, but it's going to be a bit of a PITA, and require a fair bit of compromise and tolerance on the part of the rider to adapt himself to the bike's limitations for that usage; the new SS should make for a better choice for that usage.
My SS is not a daily driver, never gonna be a daily driver. I drive it daily, but I can't carry f#ck all, there are very limited options for luggage and it's not a comfortable bike for a passenger. It has a turning radius of about 10m and is not geared for around town commuting. Don't get me wrong, I love the bike... I just went on a twisty ride yesterday and it's just an amazing bike in the curves and the roar of that engine makes me grin and shiver at the same time. Everytime I think about trading in the SS for something "more sensible" around town I just can't bear to get rid of it. I'd call it a very attractive underpowered sportbike (by today's market standards, not my personal standards) with slightly better ergos. No more, no less.

I think if the price is right there will be a market for the new SS, for people like me who a) don't want or need 160 rwhp and b) don't want or need a >$20K pricetag. (Aside: not sure why it's all the rage to put the power and handling of a sportbike into an upright touring bike that you can't lean over without grinding off the footpegs. Is it just me?) As for the fugliness, I think designers are for the most part herd-followers and Ducati is no different. The "beaked" bikes seem here to stay for now, although it'd sure be nice to see some variety and alternatives for those of us whose cranks this look just does not turn.
 

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... however, I've always loved the 749/999 design with the over/under headlights. It's all personal preference.
To each his own. Personally, I find the 999 to be by far the least attractive Ducati superbike ever. And I think Terblanche is the Chris Bangle of motorcycles.

... Ducatis have had a rep for less-than-stellar reliablity (earned or not) which I think hurt them at the time they were trying to get into this market... that and the price of the bikes with SBK engines and horsepower. Everybody always knew Ducs were fast, and the Monster ushered in a new level of "coolness" parked in front of the coffee shop, but Ducati didn't have anything particularly novel to draw in the sport-touring crowd.
Pretty much everything Italian has had a rep for less-than-stellar reliability. Italian designers, for just about any marque, expect the owners to (a) use them regularly, and (b) maintain them properly. Americans aren't very good at either of those; most Italian machines in America get bought as toys and spend way too much time in storage.

I think Ducati did have something novel to offer the sport-touring crowd: the lightest and sportiest sport-tourer on the market. Unfortunately for Ducati, the sport touring crowd mostly wanted more toury and less sporty, with less maintenance.

... My SS is not a daily driver, never gonna be a daily driver. ...
But it does make a more practical daily driver than the 916/996. The market has shifted some, of course, but the point of keeping that in the line after the superbikes were introduced was to have a less hard-edged sportbike for those who wanted a sporty bike, but not one that was only good for that.

... I think if the price is right there will be a market for the new SS, for people like me who a) don't want or need 160 rwhp and b) don't want or need a >$20K pricetag. (Aside: not sure why it's all the rage to put the power and handling of a sportbike into an upright touring bike that you can't lean over without grinding off the footpegs. Is it just me?) ...
Because too many buyers make their decisions on specsheets, benchracing, and magazine articles. I've seen quite a lot of discussions in which many people think that anything less than 100hp isn't suitable for even being on the highway, much less actually travelling. They think anything less than that is a "starter bike". In real life, 50hp is sufficient, and 75hp is more than enough, for handling pretty much anything in the real world.

PhilB
 

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Where to start? Let's go with bona fides. After 23 yrs. on other bikes I bought my first Ducati in April 1998. A brand new 1997 SS/SP. Loved that bike and might still have it if some jerk in a Civic hadn't totalled it and, almost, me. Bought a used '96 SS/SP, modified the hell out of it and rode it until a divorce and money issues made me sell it. Since then I've owned two 998s and my current SS100DS. I really loved every one of these bikes. I would love to have another 998 but when I was forced to pick either my Bayliss 998 or my SS1000DS, the SS won. And, it has not disappointed. Supersports are great all-around, daily drivers. I have done coast to coast on them and 1,000 mi. days on them. And, although I originally loathed the PT Supersport design, I've come to really like it. If you hate the PT SS do you like the Supermono? If so, sit down, have a beer and really think about it. As to the new Supersport. My idea of a Supersport is a bike that does everything I am likely to want a bike to do. Things like commute, canyon carving, touring 1-up and just kicking around. Can it do 2-up touring? Maybe. But, that's not what I do. If the Multistrada wasn't so ugly and if Ducati hadn't bought into the phony "Adventure Bike" (how many Multi riders go off road beyond a dirt driveway?) I might have bought one of those. If the new Supersport is just a lower powered Pannigale, I'm not interested. To me that's what it looks like. I could be wrong and I will wait to see. But, I don't want a bike that looks like a Yamaha R1. I want something that shouts "Ducati!" and is a great all-around bike.
 

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Bon Vivant
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Bruce I dont know why it bothers you so much that the Multistrad isn't a dirt bike. Is it because some people say it is? Do you need it to be a dirt bike? Weather it is or isn't and weather people believe it is or isn't makes absolutely no difference in what it does so well - and what it does so well is being a fantastic all-rounder that is practical, high performing, and fun. It's too bad that you have some sort of mental block because you think its posing as something it shouldn't pose as. I dont care that its not a KTM ADV bike - I didnt want a KTM ADV bike. I wanted what the multi excels at and I think most people that buy it do too.

Now if we can just agree that its not a dirtbike can we get past that and look at what it does so well? - oh yeah sport touring is what it does better than any ST ever made... It's lighter, faster, more nimble and just as comfortable as any touring bike and it will smoke any of them at the track. The multistrada is exactly the bike you say you want but you deny yourself because its not something you dont want - that makes a lot of sense.

And yeah I'll say it - I hate the supermono and I've never figured out why it has become such a cult collectors item - the bike is a pig.

I think we need to settle down and not judge this new SS until we get a chance to see it, touch it, ...take spin. Who knows? it could be a whole lot better than we think.
 

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And yeah I'll say it - I hate the supermono and I've never figured out why it has become such a cult collectors item - the bike is a pig.

I hate to butt in, but dude, you need to rethink the pig part. Name an under 600 cc single that even comes close. :)
 
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